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Understanding Pac-Man Ghost Behavior

Understanding Pac-Man Ghost Behavior
Posted on December 2, 2010 It only seems right for me to begin this blog with the topic that inspired me to start it in the first place. Not too long ago, I came across Jamey Pittman’s “Pac-Man Dossier”, which is a ridiculously-detailed explanation of the mechanics of Pac-Man. I found it absolutely fascinating, so this site is my attempt to discover and aggregate similarly-detailed information about other games (albeit in much smaller chunks). However, as a bit of a tribute, I’m going to start with Pac-Man as well, specifically the ghost AI. It’s an interesting topic, and hopefully my explanation will be a bit more accessible than Jamey’s, due to focusing on only the information relevant to ghost behavior. About the Game “All the computer games available at the time were of the violent type - war games and space invader types. Pac-Man is one of the most iconic video games of all time, and most people (even non-gamers) have at least a passing familiarity with it. The Ghost House Wrapping Up

http://gameinternals.com/post/2072558330/understanding-pac-man-ghost-behavior

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