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Why Study Philosophy? 'To Challenge Your Own Point of View' - Hope Reese

Why Study Philosophy? 'To Challenge Your Own Point of View' - Hope Reese
At a time when advances in science and technology have changed our understanding of our mental and physical selves, it is easy for some to dismiss the discipline of philosophy as obsolete. Stephen Hawking, boldly, argues that philosophy is dead. Not according to Rebecca Newberger Goldstein. Goldstein, a philosopher and novelist, studied philosophy at Barnard and then earned her Ph.D. in philosophy at Princeton University. She has written several books, won a MacArthur “Genius Award” in 1996, and taught at several universities, including Barnard, Columbia, Rutgers, and Brandeis. Goldstein’s forthcoming book, Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away, offers insight into the significant—and often invisible—progress that philosophy has made. You came across The Story of Philosophy by Will Durant as a kid. I grew up in a very religious Orthodox Jewish household and everybody seemed to have firm opinions about all sorts of big questions. It made my mother intensely uncomfortable.

http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2014/02/why-study-philosophy-to-challenge-your-own-point-of-view/283954/

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