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© Philip Houiellebecq Rising food prices and a yearning for a bit of homegrown green may be some of the reasons why city dwellers turn to gardening. But for those who lack land to actually grow food on, do-it-yourself ideas like windowfarming can be a revelation -- especially when all you have is some window sill space. Aimed at those who are looking to try out windowfarming, but are reluctant about spending hours building their own system, British product designer Philip Houiellebecq's conceptual hydroponic growing system Auxano offers the ease of similar DIY windowfarms -- and without relying on electricity and the guesswork involved with other systems we've featured previously like Urbio. Made of recycled HDPE, steel and rubber, Auxano is designed as a slim, nested unit that can come apart easily, and can be arranged either vertically or horizontally. Plants and their roots are inserted into the removable top, which allows for easier harvesting. © Philip Houiellebecq

http://www.treehugger.com/sustainable-product-design/auxano-hydroponic-indoor-gardening-unit-philip-houiellebecq.html

Related:  Window FarmingAgriculture domestiqueWindow farmwindow farmGardening

Windowfarms let you garden - appropriately enough - in your windows Whereas the majority of vertical farming concepts and projects featured in Gizmag over the years have either been huge dedicated structures or add-ons to existing buildings, the Windowfarms system downsizes and personalizes veggie growing by placing an indoor farm in the window. The original plastic-bottle-based, do-it-yourself hydroponics system design has been available for a while now but the developers are getting ready to make a new, improved kit version available. View all The Windowfarms system was first developed by Britta Riley after reading an article in the New York Times about growing your own food. Living in a Brooklyn apartment building somewhat limited the amount of space on offer to the urban farmer so Riley began working with Rebecca Bray on a vertical hydroponics home farm system capable of year-round growing in almost any window.

Vertical Farms Aren't Going to Solve Our Food Problems Vertical (Diagonal?) Farm from Work AC in NYC TreeHugger has been dining on vertical farms since Mike first wrote about them back in 2005. We have not been entirely uncritical of them, even calling them Pie in the Sky. Stan Cox and David Van Tassel go a lot further in an article published in Alternet. Window Farms Org 1) Translated by: Windowfarms Core Team. Welcome to the Instructions for MAMA! The Windowfarms Version 3.0 Modular Airlift Multicolumn Array (MAMA). Please make sure you have registered on our.windowfarms.org, including having accepted the terms of service for participating in this open design community project. Spindow? Rotating Two-Face Window Plus Built-In Planter None of the ideas behind this is itself new, but the combination is a neat realization of multiple functions in one object for everyday home fenestration. First, yes, these are easier to clean than simple American-style, up-or-side-sliding windows, but the Europeans solved that problem some time ago with their dual-mode designs (which open at an angle for breezes while maintaining security, or rotate inward like doors depending on how you turn the handle). More interesting, perhaps, is the addition of a detachable planter that can take full advantage of being swung back indoors during adverse weather conditions (be it too much rain, or heat, or cold) then spun back outside just as easily. Of course, it can be left halfway open as well to catch breezes, but one does have to wonder about the safety of such an arrangement. Dubbed simply the Two Face Window by Junkyung Kim & Yonggu Do, this author still rather prefers ‘Spindow’ regardless.

Plants For A Future : 7000 Edible, Medicinal & Useful Plants Recommended this month Permaculture News: Permaculture International Research Network (PIRN) and Free Research Handbook Research is one of the five key areas of the UK Permaculture Association's work. All aspects of the Association's research share two key aims; building a strong evidence base for permaculture and improving permaculture practice. Recently the Permaculture International Research Network (PIRN) has was launched. Window Farms A Windowfarm is a vertical, indoor garden kit that allows for year-round growing in almost any window. It lets plants use natural window light, the climate control of your living space, and organic “liquid soil.” In the hydroponic system, nutrient-spiked water is pumped up from a reservoir at the base of the system and trickles down from bottle to bottle, bathing the roots along the way.

Sleek hydroponic unit lets you grow a garden in your kitchen © Nano Garden Indoor gardening solutions come in a range of possibilities -- from do-it-yourself windowfarming kits to more high-tech fare. The futuristic, hydroponic Nano Garden fits in the latter category, allowing urban dwellers who have a bit more space in their homes to grow trays of veggies, herbs and greens right in their kitchen. Dreamed up by a team of designers from Hyundai's engineering and construction division and South Korean design firm Gromo, the Nano Kitchen concept is a home-scaled, tiered unit for urban dwellers, say the creators on FastCo.Design: Nano Garden is a vegetable garden for the apartment kitchen, using hydroponics, so users don't need to worry about pesticides or fertilizers. Instead of the sunlight, Nano Garden has lighting which promotes the growth of plants.

Window Farms It all started when Britta Riley decided to build a mini-garden in a Brooklyn window, creating a low-maintenance and self-sufficient alternative to consuming. We’ve been fans of Window Farm‘s edible gardens for long while, and just in time for the holiday season the team has evolved their fantastic gardening systems to create a brand new stand-up version of their original microfarms. These mini-gardens can hang in columns or stand on the sill, allowing you to grow fresh vegetables, herbs, and leafy treats in practically any space. Britta Riley‘s vertical hydroponic Window Farm systems are a boon for space-starved urban dwellers looking to start their own garden.

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