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The 6 Types of Creative Commons Licences Students Should know about

The 6 Types of Creative Commons Licences Students Should know about
February 8, 2014 Creators enrich the web with their creations but without licensing others to use and in some cases add up to that work, innovation will never develop. This is where the importance of a licensing body such as Creative Commons comes in handy. Creative Commons is a non-profit that helps sharing and reuse of creativity and knowledge via free legal and technological tools . These tools are not alternatives to copyright laws, rather they work alongside them. To help you introduce your students to the different types of Creative Commons I am sharing with you this handy graphic which outlines the 6 major types of CC licenses.

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/02/the-6-types-of-creative-commons.html

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One of the first things you definitely need to talk to your students about particularly during the first month of this new school year is the importance of respecting the copyrights of digital content they find on the net or anywhere else. Students need to understand how to correctly attribute credits to copyright holders when they include their works in classroom projects. To do this, they need to comprehend the notion of creative Commons. Educational technology and Mobile Learning has already published some good posts to help you teach your students about Creative Commons, I invite you to have a look and share with your students as well. A Handy Visual on How Teachers Can Create and Use QR Code from iPad QR codes are gaining a strong foothold in the field of education. Several teachers are trying them now as teaching and learning tools with students in the classroom. The widespread of mobile gadgetry together with the abundance of QR code readers have made these codes viable tools with an increasing potential in educational settings. relevant: 10 Outstanding QR Code Readers for Teachers If you are not yet familiar with what QR codes are all about and how you can use them with your students, check out "teacher's simple guide to the use of QR codes in education" to get started.Today, however, I am sharing with you this fabulous visual guide from iPad4schools to walk you through the steps you need to follow to create a QR code hunt with just your ipad. This visual guide is available for download in PDF format from this LINK.

A Visual Guide To Creative Commons Licensing A Visual Guide To Creative Commons Licensing Creative Commons licensing was one of the best things that ever happened to the internet. Where once the internet was an untamed beast overran by plagiarism, non-attributed image theft, copyright confusion, and super shaky sense of who owns what–well, really that hasn’t changed for most.

February 11, 2014 Working with digital media materials implicitly entails a tacit knowledge about the different concepts related to copyright and fair use. I have always insisted through the posts I shared in the "copyright materials for teachers " section here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on the importance of teaching our students about how to properly credit sources and documents they grab from Internet. Of course copyright literature is huge and complicated and is hard to understand it all but having a working rudimentary knowledge of what relates to copyright issues within educational settings is not something to sweat over. In this regard, I am sharing with you this great course entitled "Copyright Crash Course" from University of Texas that outlines in a very clear and eloquent language the different things we, as teachers and students, need to know about copyright. The main points covered in this course are featured below.

Can Email Be Responsive? Love it or hate it, there’s no denying the popularity of HTML emails. And, like the web before it, the inbox has officially gone mobile—with over 50 percent of email opens occurring on mobile devices. Still, email design is an outrageously outdated practice. Remember coding before web standards became… standards? 8 Resources To Find & Edit Digital Images Without Being Sued by simplyzesty.com 8 Resources To Find & Edit Digital Images Without Being Sued If you own or write for a blog, you will know the pain and annoyance of sourcing images for it. No matter what type of post you’re writing, images are always needed to brighten them up and break up the walls of text. However, adapting a strategy of going onto Google Images and plucking images without attribution will land you in hot water sooner or later, so it’s best to have all bases covered before you do anything. Also, it’s good karma to show where they originally came from.

Other Infographics Student Infographics Teacher Infographics There are a lot of Copyright myths and misunderstandings – particularly when it comes to Internet Copyright Infringement. The Myths and Facts about Copyright Infringement Infographic explains how to avoid breaching Copyright and how to protect teachers and students from Copyright Infringement online. Via: legal123.com.au Embed This Education Infographic on your Site or Blog! Copy and Paste the following code! A Guide to Little-Known Image Collections with Millions of Free, Hi-Res Images I’m often asked where to go to find high-quality and hi-resolution still images for reuse so I’ve put together this guide. There have been several new image collections that have opened up to the public just within the past year that not many people are aware of yet, but they offer access to thousands, or in some cases millions of outstanding photographs that can be downloaded for free. Here’s a quick guide to finding those collections. The Metropolitan Museum of Art Last month, the Metropolitan Museum of Art made over 400,000 images available for free download for non-commercial use as a part of its Open Access for Scholarly Content initiative.

June 11, 2014 Today, I am adding another wonderful work in this direction. This work is realized by Silvia Rosenthal and Meryl Zeidenberg. Most of the readers of this blog know Slivia (editor of the popular blog "Langwitches") for I have shared several of her works in the past. How to Cite and Credit Images February 26, 2014 With the massive uptake of web 2.0 technologies knowledge becomes much more democratized and anyone with internet connection can virtually access, read, re-use, and share online content at a spectacular speed. And while this technological boom has destroyed the shackles and geographical barriers that used to stand in the way of a fully literate society, copyright issues have been on the raise particularly with this growing mindset among millennials that anything findable online is free to use. Our job as teachers is to draw our students attention to the fact that copy-paste culture is destructive and that appropriate citations and crediting back the sources, if ever we are allowed to, are two important things we always need to invoke as we are dealing with both digital and non digital content. I have an entire section in this blog packed full of resources, tools and tips on how to teach your students about copyright, check it out here to learn more.

s Copyright and Fair Use Resources This is a tool that explains everything you need to know about copyright, and then some! Learn what copyright is and is not, what it protects, what Public Domain is, what the difference is between Copyright and Plagiarism, and a LOT more. Do you remember what the acronym DMCA stands for?

A Must See Interactive Graphic on Teaching Students about Copyright Today we are adding this wonderful resource from Cyberbee. This is basically an interactive image which includes important information in the form of answers to questions students might raise when discussing the topic of copyright. To start using this resource all you need to do is to hover your pointer over a student to read the question then click on that student to read the answer. Here are the questions asked by students in this interactive graphic, to see the answer you need to click on a student. 1- What is copyright 2- What about me ? Does't the public have rights to use music and art ?

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