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Cartoon Fundamentals: How to Draw Cartoon Hands

Cartoon Fundamentals: How to Draw Cartoon Hands
The human hand is probably one of the hardest things to learn how to draw, since it can take many forms and, thus, express varied emotions. In cartoon it is no different. You need to be able to draw hands in different angles, which are dynamic and attractive in the eyes of the viewer. Don't underestimate the power of a well drawn cartoon hand - it can save your art from the monotony! Several times I have been asked by some people in the comments of my tutorials how do I draw characters in many poses and different expressions. The case is that, with practice, you begin to develop your own drawing style and without that other people know it, you begin to use some shortcuts in your art. The fact is that doing this with hands is very difficult! The hand consists of several different bones, particularly the fingers, which means that they have different sizes and could bend in different directions. Starting from the back of the hands, let's draw the following simple semi circle: Excellent!

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