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Reciprocal Teaching

Reciprocal Teaching
Before Reciprocal Teaching can be used successfully by your students, they need to have been taught and had time to practice the four strategies that are used in reciprocal teaching (summarizing, questioning, predicting, clarifying). One way to get students prepared to use reciprocal teaching: (from Donna Dyer of the North West Regional Education Service Agency in North Carolina) Put students in groups of four. Distribute one note card to each member of the group identifying each person's unique role: Summarizer Questioner Clarifier Predictor Have students read a few paragraphs of the assigned text selection. Encourage them to use note-taking strategies such as selective underlining or sticky-notes to help them better prepare for their role in the discussion. At the given stopping point, the Summarizer will highlight the key ideas up to this point in the reading. For more information, see the article Reciprocal Teaching for the Primary Grades: "We Can Do It, Too!".

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Reciprocal Teaching for the Primary Grades: "We Can Do It, Too!" In 1978, Durkin (1978-1979) made what continues to be an alarming observation: less than 1% of classroom reading instruction was dedicated to comprehension instruction. When comprehension instruction occurred, the focus was on asking students questions about the text-assessing comprehension, not providing instruction. More recently, Pressley, Whar ton-McDonald, Mistretta-Hampston, and Echevarria (1998) examined reading instruction in 10 fourth- and fifth-grade classrooms. Teaching Reading Traditionally, the purpose of learning to read in a language has been to have access to the literature written in that language. In language instruction, reading materials have traditionally been chosen from literary texts that represent "higher" forms of culture. This approach assumes that students learn to read a language by studying its vocabulary, grammar, and sentence structure, not by actually reading it.

Reciprocal Teaching Strategies for Reading ComprehensionReciprocal Teaching[Palincsar et al, 1984, 1986] What Is Reciprocal Teaching?The creation of Palinscar and Brown, Reciprocal Teaching is in some ways a compilation of four comprehension strategies: Reading Context Clues Study Guide In this lesson, you'll discover that authors give clues in the text to help you understand what you read. You just have to be a word detective and find them! SOMETIMES AUTHORS NEEDor want to use words they know will be unknown by their readers. So authors slip in other words or phrases to help readers figure out the unknown ones. Authors may define the word, give examples of similar things, or restate the idea to make it clearer.

Learning Oriented Assessment What is Learning Oriented Assessment (LOA)? The term Learning Oriented Assessment is one of several which have been used in recent years with a similar purpose in mind: to carve out a place for a form of assessment with different priorities and values from those of traditional assessment, with its focus on reliability and validity. Like the classroom-based assessment movement in the US, or the Assessment Reform Group’s promotion of formative assessment or Assessment for Learning in the UK, LOA proposes a form of assessment whose primary purpose is to promote learning.

Learning styles – the emperor with no clothes All aboard … The point of adaptive learning is that it can personalize learning. When we talk about personalization, mention of learning styles is rarely far away. Jose Ferreira of Knewton (but now ex-CEO Knewton) made his case for learning styles in a blog post that generated a superb and, for Ferreira, embarrassing discussion in the comments that were subsequently deleted by Knewton. The Teacher Curse No One Wants to Talk About Knowledge is a curse. Knowing things isn't bad itself, but it causes unhealthy assumptions -- such as forgetting how hard it was to learn those things in the first place. It's called the Curse of Knowledge. In this post, we'll identify how the Curse of Knowledge affects educators.

54 Flipped Classroom Tools For Teachers And Students - 54 Flipped Classroom Tools For Teachers And Students by TeachThought Staff The flipped classroom has continued to enjoy momentum years after its introduction, speaking to its flexible nature, and to the need for a real change in thinking in how we think of time and space in education. Technology has been, more than anything else, the catalyst for the flipped movement. With YouTube now nearly as ubiquitous as the television in many homes, access to video content is more seamless than ever. Further, teachers have taken advantage of not just video channels but a collective video literacy to realize the potential of flipping the classroom.

How to Cope With Frustrated Child in Elementary School It’s common for grade-schoolers to push their parents’ buttons sometimes. But there may be times when your child has strong reactions that seem to come out of nowhere. You might think he’s simply testing limits (or your patience). Instead, his reactions may be outbursts of frustration related to his learning and attention issues. 180 Days Challenge Congratulations! You finished the year. Now that it’s June, how did you do? How many kids did you help succeed? In theory, giving you an answer to that question should be as easy as tallying up your score and checking the numbers. And yet, the task of building a healthy school climate or supporting the needs of your own child does not come with an exhaustive set of do’s and don’ts.

How People Learn: An Evidence-Based Approach Proposals to "professionalize teaching" are popular today, but agreement about what this should entail is elusive. At Deans for Impact, an organization composed of leaders of programs that prepare new teachers, we believe that part of what distinguishes members of a profession is general agreement on a body of domain-specific knowledge that is relevant to practice. We recently released "The Science of Learning," a report that summarizes the cognitive science related to how students learn. The principles in this post are drawn from that report. Teachers will always need to use their knowledge of students and content to make professional judgments about classroom practice. However, we believe the art of teaching should also be informed by a robust understanding of the learning sciences so that teachers can align their decisions with our profession's best understanding of how students learn.

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