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Paris Review Daily - Blog, Writers, Poets, Artists - Paris Review

Paris Review Daily - Blog, Writers, Poets, Artists - Paris Review
Donald Barthelme would’ve been, and should be, eighty-three today. It would be an exaggeration to say that I feel the absence of someone whom I never met—someone who died when I was three—but I do wonder, with something more than mere curiosity, what Barthelme would have made of the past twenty-odd years. These are decades I feel we’ve processed less acutely because he wasn’t there to fictionalize them: their surreal political flareups, their new technologies, their various zeitgeists and intellectual fads and dumb advertisements. Part of what I love about Barthelme’s stories is the way they traffic in cultural commentary without losing their intimacy, their humanity. But I’m losing the thread. My point is not to reveal a secret wish that Barthelme was my uncle. I wanted to say something about lists. A zombie advances toward a group of thin blooming daughters and describes, with many motions of his hands and arms, the breakfasts they may expect in a zombie home.

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MZS RogerEbert.com editor-in-chief Matt Zoller Seitz announces his next director book, about Oliver Stone. Continue reading → The most important thing Roger Ebert taught me. Titles with full-text online "The 1688 Paradise Lost and Dr. Aldrich": Metropolitan Museum Journal, v. 6 (1972) Boorsch, Suzanne (1972) 20th-Century Art: A Resource for Educators Paul, Stella (1999) 82nd & Fifth The Metropolitan Museum of Art (2013) Abbot Suger and Saint-Denis Gerson, Paula Lieber, ed. (1986) "About Mäda": Metropolitan Museum Journal, v. 40 (2005) Baetjer, Katharine (2005)

Page-Turner April 8, 2014 Slide Show: Kurt Vonnegut’s Whimsical Drawings Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.,’s crude, ludic doodles—a beaver, a cobra, an asterisk-anus—are famous from novels like “Breakfast of Champions,” as is the curly-haired self-portrait that doubled as his signature. But making graphic art was, for Vonnegut, a hobby that extended beyond illustrations for his fiction: he painted seascapes and landscapes on Cape Cod in the nineteen-fifties; felt-tip drawings of abstract faces on discarded pages of manuscripts; and larger, more formal color drawings that he exhibited in a one-man show in Greenwich Village in 1980. Vonnegut described his artwork as a pursuit that liberated him from the oppressive work of writing.

Roundtable - Lapham&#8217s Quarterly Elias Altman Miracles and Manure: Notes on “Revolutions” Tags: introductions, Revolutions, Roundtable, Spring 2014 It's a popular dismissal of revolutions to say that they always end in the tyranny they sought to overthrow. What use is the whole bloody mess if the oppressed becomes the oppressor? Fair enough, but the former tyranny had also ended in tyranny, and holding too dearly to the inevitability hypothesis resembles writing off the project of birth by proving the surety of death.

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