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Infinity Point Will Arrive by 2035 Latest

Infinity Point Will Arrive by 2035 Latest
Eray Ozkural December 23, 2013 During writing a paper for the 100 Year Starship Symposium, I wished to convince the starship designers that they should acknowledge the dynamics of high-technology economy, which may be crucial for interstellar missions. Thus motivated, I have made a new calculation regarding infinity point, also known as the singularity. Infinity Point was the original name for the hypothetical event when almost boundless amount of intelligence would be available in Solomonoff's original research in 1985 (1), who is also the founder of mathematical Artificial Intelligence (AI) field. The original theory arrives at the Infinity Point conclusion by making a few simple mathematical assumptions, and solving a system of equations. Computer Science (CS) community size ~ improvement in computing technologyCS community size ~ rate of log of computing efficiencyFixed amount of money is invested in AI every year and the total number of synapses is less than . Onwards to the future! Related:  Exponential Change - Technological SingularityA I / Robotics et al.

A Singularity in All Four Quadrants The Singularity: Rupture or Rapture? There is an old analogy about an ancient emperor of China and the inventor of chess that is often used to help understand the speed of technological growth. According to the story, once the emperor became aware of the game of chess, he sent a message throughout the kingdom seeking to reward its inventor, offering anything within his power to give for such an exceptional game. Upon meeting him, the inventor, who was a poor peasant farmer, thanked the emperor for his generosity, and proceeded to place a single grain of rice in the first square of a chessboard. He then placed two grains in the second square, four in the third, eight in the fourth, etc., doubling the number of grains for each of the chessboard's 64 squares. At first the emperor was fairly amused by the farmer's request—after all, these were mere grains of rice, how much could he possibly lose? According to Moore's Law, computational power is doubling every 18 months. Conclusion

The best visuals to explain the Singularity to senior executives Tomorrow morning I’m doing a presentation to the top executive team of a very large organization on the next 20 years. Most of what I will cover will be general societal, business and technological drivers as well as specific strategic issues driving their business. However as part of stretching their thinking I’ll also speak a about the Singularity. As such I’ve been trying to find one good image to introduce my explanation, however I haven’t been able to find one which is quite right for the purpose. Ray Kurzweil’s Six Epochs diagram below is great and the one I’ll probably end up using, however it is a bit too over-the-top for most senior executives. Source: Ray Kurzweil, Applied Abstractions The chart below from Hans Moravec showing how exponential growth of computing power will allow machines to match human intellectual capabilities is excellent, but it is seriously out of date. Source: Hans Moravec, When will computer hardware match the human brain? Source: Ray Kurzweil, Tropophilia

ECCO Home | ecco.vub.ac.be Mededeling: cookies Tegenlicht kijkt mee over de schouder van een man die ondanks de crisis een overvloedige toekomst verwacht: Peter Diamandis. Door technologische ontwikkelingen wordt het leven beter dan ooit. Terwijl de wereld in crisis is, is één man positiever dan ooit. Diamandis, schrijver van het boek ‘Abundance’, verkondigt zijn ideeën op de door hemzelf en de bekende futuroloog Ray Kurzweil opgerichte ‘ Singularity University’, midden in Silicon Valley. In deze uitzending kijkt Tegenlicht naar de wereld door de ogen van Peter Diamandis. Maar de ideeën van Peter Diamandis gaan verder dan specifieke technologische oplossingen. En alsof het allemaal nog niet snel genoeg gaat, wijst Diamandis erop hoe we allemaal meedoen aan deze versnelling. Zoals bijvoorbeeld Jack Andraka, een 16-jarige middelbare scholier die met Google en Wikipedia een hele nieuwe, superefficiënte kankertest ontwikkelde.

The lead up to the Singularity Technological Singularity The technological singularity is the hypothesis that accelerating progress in technologies will cause a runaway effect wherein artificial intelligence will exceed human intellectual capacity and control, thus radically changing civilization in an event called the singularity.[1] Because the capabilities of such an intelligence may be impossible for a human to comprehend, the technological singularity is an occurrence beyond which events may become unpredictable, unfavorable, or even unfathomable.[2] The first use of the term "singularity" in this context was by mathematician John von Neumann. Proponents of the singularity typically postulate an "intelligence explosion",[5][6] where superintelligences design successive generations of increasingly powerful minds, that might occur very quickly and might not stop until the agent's cognitive abilities greatly surpass that of any human. Basic concepts Superintelligence Non-AI singularity Intelligence explosion Exponential growth Plausibility

The Hivemind Singularity - Alan Jacobs In a near-future science fiction novel, human intelligence evolves into a hivemind that makes people the violent cells of a collective being. Slime mold network formation (Science). New Model Army, a 2010 novel by the English writer Adam Roberts, concerns itself with many things: the intimacy shared by soldiers at war, the motivating powers of memory and love, the rival merits of hierarchical and anarchic social structures, the legitimacy of the polity known as Great Britain, the question of European identity. Also giants. The title New Model Army derives from the English Civil War in the mid-seventeenth century, when Oliver Cromwell led armies raised by Parliament against supporters of King Charles. With this background in mind, Adam Roberts asks us to imagine a near future when electronic communications technologies enable groups of people to communicate with one another instantaneously, and on secure private networks invulnerable, or nearly so, to outside snooping.

How will technology impact the future of health and medicine? Navigation Watch a Brief Day Three Recap More Videos from 2014 Participant Testimonials More Testimonials from 2014 2014 Program Schedule 2014 Faculty About Exponential Medicine Past Event Photos Synthesis Videos Participant Testimonials Exponential Medicine Exponential Medicine is a four-day conference by Singularity University that brings together top experts to inform medical services leaders how technology is impacting healthcare and medicine. See our Program Agenda and 2014 Faculty. Follow Us Powered By VisitorEngage f Coastline paradox An example of the coastline paradox. If the coastline of Great Britain is measured using units 100 km (62 mi) long, then the length of the coastline is approximately 2,800 km (1,700 mi). With 50 km (31 mi) units, the total length is approximately 3,400 km (2,100 mi), approximately 600 km (370 mi) longer. The coastline paradox is the counterintuitive observation that the coastline of a landmass does not have a well-defined length. More concretely, the length of the coastline depends on the method used to measure it. Mathematical aspects[edit] The basic concept of length originates from Euclidean distance. Using a few straight lines to approximate the length of a curve will produce a low estimate. However, not all curves can be measured in this way. This Sierpiński curve, which repeats the same pattern on a smaller and smaller scale, continues to increase in length. Practical[edit] See also[edit] Notes[edit] Bibliography[edit] Post, David G., and Michael Eisen. External links[edit]

The Singularity is closer than it appears! Published on Mar 7, 2014 - Socrates of Singularity 1 on 1 sits down with William Hertling to talk about the technological singularity and AI. William Hertling is a rather recent science fiction discovery of mine and the author of award-winning novels Avogadro Corp: The Singularity Is Closer Than It Appears, A.I. Apocalypse, and The Last Firewall. William has written several plausible scenarios for the technological singularity that were so engaging and compelling that, as soon as I finished his first book, I could not help it but go ahead and read the next one too. And so I was very happy to get an opportunity and interview Hertling on my Singularity 1 on 1 podcast. Podcast: Play in new window | Download This is the second out of a series of 3 sci fi round-table interviews with Ramez Naam, William Hertling and Greg Bear that I did last November in Seattle. (You can listen to/download the audio file above or watch the video interview in full. Who is William Hertling? , A.I. . Listen/View

Extinction Timeline: what will disappear from our lives before 2050 When people talk about the future, they usually point to all the new things that will come to pass. However the evolution of human society is as much about old things disappearing as new things appearing. This means it is particularly useful to consider everything in our lives that is likely to become extinct. Below is the Extinction Timeline created jointly by What’s Next and Future Exploration Network – click on the image for the detailed timeline as a pdf (1.2MB). For those who want a quick summary of a few of the things that we anticipate will become extinct in coming years: 2009: Mending things 2014: Getting lost 2016: Retirement 2019: Libraries 2020: Copyright 2022: Blogging, Speleeng, The Maldives 2030: Keys 2033: Coins 2036: Petrol engined vehicles 2037: Glaciers 2038: Peace & Quiet 2049: Physical newspapers, Google Beyond 2050: Uglyness, Nation States, Death Trend map 2007+ and Nowandnext.com’s Innovation Timeline 1900- 2050: And of course, please don’t take this too seriously :-).

Internet Traffic is now 51% Non-Human So you thought the Internet was made by and for people? Think again. A study by Incapsula, a provider of cloud-based security for web sites (mind you where this data comes from), concludes that 51% of all Internet traffic is generated by non-human sources such as hacking software, scrapers and automated spam mechanisms. The study is based on data collected from 1,000 websites that utilize Incapsula’s services, and it determined that just 49% of Web traffic is human browsing. 20% is benign non-human search engine traffic, but 31% of all Internet traffic is tied to malicious activities. 19% is from ” ‘spies’ collecting competitive intelligence,” 5% is from automated hacking tools seeking out vulnerabilities, 5% is from scrapers and 2% is from content spammers. Presumably these numbers will only rise. Thanks Bruce.

The future of technology will "pale" the previous 20 years

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