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IEA - World Energy Outlook

IEA - World Energy Outlook
Released on 12 November 2013 Large differences in regional energy prices are set to affect industrial competitiveness, influencing investment decisions and company strategies. The extraordinary rise of light tight oil in the United States will play a major role in meeting global demand growth over the next decade, but the Middle East – the only large source of low-cost oil – will remain at the centre of the longer-term oil outlook. India is set to overtake China in the 2020s as the principal source of growth in global energy demand. Read more about WEO-2013 | Order WEO-2013 Bringing together the latest data and policy developments, the World Energy Outlook 2013 presents up to date, projections of energy trends through to 2035, fuel by fuel, sector by sector, region by region and scenario by scenario.

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Accueil Manicore English version Documentation Environnement Energy Intelligence Energy Intelligence is the leading provider of independent, objective insight, analysis, and data to the global energy industry. Our worldwide network of experts has been delivering market-critical information and unbiased analysis to the top decision-makers in the global oil and gas business for almost 60 years. Read more With a staff of seasoned specialists and affiliations across the industry, our expertise can be deployed around the world to assist you with a broad spectrum of research and advisory services. Marine Ice Sheet Collapse Potentially Under Way for the Thwaites Glacier Basin, West Antarctica Resting atop a deep marine basin, the West Antarctic Ice Sheet has long been considered prone to instability. Using a numerical model, we investigated the sensitivity of Thwaites Glacier to ocean melt and whether its unstable retreat is already under way. Our model reproduces observed losses when forced with ocean melt comparable to estimates. Simulated losses are moderate (<0.25 mm per year at sea level) over the 21st century but generally increase thereafter. Except possibly for the lowest-melt scenario, the simulations indicate that early-stage collapse has begun.

5 Things That Actually Determine the Price of Gasoline - Part 5 Written by Brian Merchant The price of gasoline is one of the most important variables in daily American life. The vast majority of Americans own cars—there are some 240 million of them on the road—and rely on them to commute to work and for general transportation. Whenever gas prices get too high, it can cause an economic shock for hundreds of millions of people. So whenever those prices show signs of heading towards the $4 a gallon mark, a mild panic ensues. Do You Know Where Your Oil Comes From? If you drive a car that runs on gas or diesel, you’ve probably thought about where the crude oil that made your fuel came from, especially when you’re standing at the fueling station watching the numbers whirl by and cringing at the thought of your next credit card bill. According to the news and speeches made by politicians, the Middle East is the major source of US oil imports, right? That’s why energy independence is so important, and why the Middle East is such a critical asset, because instability in the region could threaten oil prices and cause shortages. However, our primary source of oil imports is actually found closer to home. A lot closer, it turns out; Canada and Mexico both have very large oil reserves and they sell frequently to the US.

Presentation 2. INFORSE Background INFORSE is a worldwide network consisting of 140 Non Governmental Organisations working in about 60 countries to promote sustainable energy and social development. The Network was established in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 to secure follow-up in the political decision sat the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED). BP, Shell, Statoil accused of fixing oil prices The good folks at BP, Shell, and Statoil would never break the law and screw over their customers in a quest for inflated profits, surely. Yet that is the very accusation coming out of Europe, where the industry giants are suspected of colluding to fix prices for crude, biofuel, and refined oil products at artificially high levels, allowing them to reap greater profits than the laws of supply and demand would dictate in a truly competitive economy. Offices of the companies were raided last week by European Commission officials, and the Justice Department is being urged to investigate whether the alleged price fixing spilled over onto American shores. From The Hill: The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee Chairman aired his concerns about the recent probe by EU officials into potential oil price manipulation in a Friday letter to Attorney General Eric Holder.[Sen.

Oil Spills: U.S. well sites in 2012 discharged more than Valdez Advertisement It went up orange, a gas-propelled geyser that rose 100 feet over the North Dakota prairie. But it was oil, so it came down brown. Why the Peak Oilers are still right The piece is excerpted from the new book Snake Oil: How Fracking’s False Promise of Plenty Imperils Our Future. For the past decade I’ve been a participant in a high-stakes energy policy debate — writing books, giving lectures, and appearing on radio and television to point out how downright dumb it is for America to continue relying on fossil fuels. Oil, coal, and natural gas are finite and depleting, and burning them changes Earth’s climate and compromises our future. In the past two or three years this debate has reached a significant turning point. Evidence that climate change is real and caused by human activity has become irrefutable, and serious climate impacts (such as the melting of the Arctic ice cap) have begun appearing sooner, and with greater severity, than had been forecast.

2013 in review: the year fracking shook the world The pumping of water, sand and chemicals underground at pressure to crack rocks and release gas dominated headlines in 2013. Fracking for shale gas, even if the process has not actually been producing much energy beyond its homeland in the US, has barely been out of the public consciousness. In the UK, drilling for oil by fracking explorers Cuadrilla in Sussex roused one of the biggest environmental protests in years, as thousands marched outside the village of Balcombe and Green party MP Caroline Lucas was arrested. A similar series of protests was mirrored in Manchester, later in the year.

Rebel smell: In the Deep South, dirty energy and disenfranchisement go hand in hand The southeastern U.S. is pre-1990s South Africa, and the brand of apartheid practiced here is of the energy variety. This is how environmental justice scholar Robert Bullard called it two years ago, and a report released yesterday from the NAACP pretty much confirms it. Clocking in at over 500 pages, the civil rights organization’s new report, “Just Energy Policies: Reducing Pollution and Creating Jobs,” reads like an update of Van Jones’s 2008 book, The Green Collar Economy, showing how far the nation has come, and not come, in advancing clean energy. Grainspotting: Farmers get desperate as coal and oil take over the rails The U.S. agriculture and energy sectors might be facing a Jets and Sharks situation: Our railroad system just ain’t big enough for the two of them! Unfortunately, this scenario is unlikely to involve a highly choreographed mambo dance-off, not that we wouldn’t love to see Rex Tillerson’s moves. He’d make a great Bernardo. American farmers are becoming concerned that coal and oil companies’ increased use of railroad shipping will crowd out grain trains.

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