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@comeetie : carte données carroyées

@comeetie : carte données carroyées

http://www.comeetie.fr/galerie/francepixels/#

Related:  Datavizmapspopulation datavizInégalités croissantesRevenu des ménages

If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system Mercury Venus Earth You Are Here Google Maps Launch Google MapsLaunch Maps in LUNA Browser The over 120 historical maps in the Google Maps have been selected by David Rumsey from his collection of more than 150,000 historical maps; in addition, there are a few maps from collections with which he collaborates. These maps can also be seen in the Gallery layer of Google Earth, Rumsey Historical Maps layer, and in the Google Earth viewers on this website. All the maps contain rich information about the past and represent a sampling of time periods (1680 to 1930), scales, and cartographic art, resulting in visual history stories that only old maps can tell. Each map has been georeferenced, thus creating unique digital map images that allow the old maps to appear in their correct places on the modern globe. The original historical maps are first made into digital images by scanning them with high resolution digital cameras.

Global Migration Patterns: the Flows of People to and from Countries Global Migration Patterns [mpg.de] by the German Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity contains a set of interactive instruments that visualize the latest global migration data. The "International Migration Flows shows the different flows to - and from - selected OECD-countries between the years 1970-2007. It illustrates the concept of "Superdiversity", or how during the last 2 decades more people than ever have moved between different locations worldwide. The outer circle shows the number of emigrants, with each bar represents a country of origin and each color conveying a unique continent. The inner circle shows the number of immigrants. One can "zoom" into the data by choosing a specific threshold, which truncates the bars to a maximum value.

Simple explanation of why capitalism is unfair Posted 1 year ago on July 29, 2012, 1:24 a.m. EST by DemandTheGoodLifeDotCom (3213) from New York, NY This content is user submitted and not an official statement The entire system of capitalism is unfair because it is based on theft and exploitation and is undemocratic.

(Almost) Everything You Need to Know about Culture in 10 Books by Maria Popova What the limits of the universe have to do with the history of jazz and the secret of happiness. Last week, I was reorganizing my library and realized that some of my favorite books are ones that introduced me to subjects I either admired but knew little about or was unaware of altogether. The Maps of Heinrich Kiepert The Maps of Heinrich Kiepert Geographer Heinrich Kiepert (1818-1899) is generally reckoned one of the more important scholarly cartographers of the second half of the 19th century. This Web page provides access to some Kiepert maps held at the University of Chicago Library's Map Collection. Kiepert acquired one of his interests—the historical geography of the classical world—in his student days at the University of Berlin, where he worked with Carl Ritter (1779-1859). Ritter and Kiepert produced what appears to have been one of the first modern atlases of the ancient Greek world, Topographisch-historischer Atlas von Hellas und den hellenischen Colonien in 24 Blättern (1840-1846).

Bio.Diaspora: Visualising interactions between populations and travel I want to share some impressive work I’ve recently come across from a Toronto-based project/group called Bio.Diaspora. Last week the team was featured in the Lancet Infectious Disease Journal as part of a special report on Mass Gatherings and Health. The report focused specifically on the potential health risks posed by the mass gathering and transit of people attending events like the Olympic Games. You can find out more information about this story on the BBC and CBC, as well as through watching the animated visualisation below. I got in touch with David Kossowsky, a GIS mapper, cartographer and graphic designer, to find out more about the work of Bio.Diaspora and some of the visualisations they have been working on. This image shows a visualisation of the global airline transportation network consisting of all commercial flights worldwide.

Let’s talk about inequality: join Blog Action Day 2014 We’ve partnered up with Blog Action Day to start a global discussion about inequality, and we need you to be part of it. On the 16th October, people from around the world will be raising their voices to make inequality go viral! Join Blog Action Day and register to take part today. Why inequality? Earlier this year, Oxfam revealed that 85 people have as much wealth as half of the people on the planet combined. Answers: The Crisis of Credit Visualized - HD Grockit Answers is just-in-time Q&A for video lectures. In Grockit Answers, interactions happen around video lectures, and participants ask and answer questions about specific points in the lecture. Since every question is attached to a specific point in time in the video, Grockit Answers displays a question and its answers at the point in the lecture that they are most relevant.

Periodis Web - Maps to be Used for the History of Europe Euratlas Periodis Web shows the history of Europe through a sequence of 21 historical maps, every map depicting the political situation at the end of each century. Here, on the left, are 21 mini-maps giving access to 21 full maps and to 84 quarters of maps with more detailed views of the states, provinces and main cities.Moreover, each map offers a historical gazetteer. Thus you can highlight in red each sovereign state and in green each dependent entity.

American migration map Overhauling his migration map from last year, Jon Bruner uses five year's worth of IRS data to map county migration in America: Each move had its own motivations, but in aggregate they ­reflect the geographical marketplace during the boom and bust of the last decade: Migrants flock to Las Vegas in 2005 in search of cheap, luxurious housing, then flee in 2009 as the city’s economy collapses; Miami beckons retirees from the North but offers little to its working-age residents, who leave for the West. Even fast-growing boomtowns like Charlotte, N.C., lose residents to their outlying counties as the demand for exurban tract-housing pushes workers ever outward. Compared to last year's map, this one is much improved.

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