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@comeetie : carte données carroyées

@comeetie : carte données carroyées

http://www.comeetie.fr/galerie/francepixels/#

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Google Maps Launch Google MapsLaunch Maps in LUNA Browser The over 120 historical maps in the Google Maps have been selected by David Rumsey from his collection of more than 150,000 historical maps; in addition, there are a few maps from collections with which he collaborates. These maps can also be seen in the Gallery layer of Google Earth, Rumsey Historical Maps layer, and in the Google Earth viewers on this website. All the maps contain rich information about the past and represent a sampling of time periods (1680 to 1930), scales, and cartographic art, resulting in visual history stories that only old maps can tell. Each map has been georeferenced, thus creating unique digital map images that allow the old maps to appear in their correct places on the modern globe. The original historical maps are first made into digital images by scanning them with high resolution digital cameras.

If the Moon Were Only 1 Pixel - A tediously accurate map of the solar system Mercury Venus Earth You Are Here Global Migration Patterns: the Flows of People to and from Countries Global Migration Patterns [mpg.de] by the German Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity contains a set of interactive instruments that visualize the latest global migration data. The "International Migration Flows shows the different flows to - and from - selected OECD-countries between the years 1970-2007. It illustrates the concept of "Superdiversity", or how during the last 2 decades more people than ever have moved between different locations worldwide. The outer circle shows the number of emigrants, with each bar represents a country of origin and each color conveying a unique continent. The inner circle shows the number of immigrants. One can "zoom" into the data by choosing a specific threshold, which truncates the bars to a maximum value.

Mesopotamia in the Classroom - Ancient History et cetera Cuneiform tablet made by a sixth grader in my class. Sixth graders typically have some background knowledge of Egypt, Greece, Rome and the Maya when we begin studying those civilizations. Right now, we are near the end of the Mesopotamia unit, about which they typically know little coming in. It has been nice to spend three weeks with every day being a brand new topic for my students. GeoSilk GeoSilk is a set of icons designed for open source web-based geospatial software. The set is an extension of Mark James's Silk icons—probably the most widely used set of icons on the web—that incorporates metaphors for spatial constructs defined by Jody Garnett's uDig icons. Take a gander at the full set or download it from the SVN repository. GeoSilk is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License, meaning anyone may use it for any purpose and make any changes they like.

The Maps of Heinrich Kiepert The Maps of Heinrich Kiepert Geographer Heinrich Kiepert (1818-1899) is generally reckoned one of the more important scholarly cartographers of the second half of the 19th century. This Web page provides access to some Kiepert maps held at the University of Chicago Library's Map Collection. Kiepert acquired one of his interests—the historical geography of the classical world—in his student days at the University of Berlin, where he worked with Carl Ritter (1779-1859). Ritter and Kiepert produced what appears to have been one of the first modern atlases of the ancient Greek world, Topographisch-historischer Atlas von Hellas und den hellenischen Colonien in 24 Blättern (1840-1846).

(Almost) Everything You Need to Know about Culture in 10 Books by Maria Popova What the limits of the universe have to do with the history of jazz and the secret of happiness. Last week, I was reorganizing my library and realized that some of my favorite books are ones that introduced me to subjects I either admired but knew little about or was unaware of altogether. Bio.Diaspora: Visualising interactions between populations and travel I want to share some impressive work I’ve recently come across from a Toronto-based project/group called Bio.Diaspora. Last week the team was featured in the Lancet Infectious Disease Journal as part of a special report on Mass Gatherings and Health. The report focused specifically on the potential health risks posed by the mass gathering and transit of people attending events like the Olympic Games. You can find out more information about this story on the BBC and CBC, as well as through watching the animated visualisation below. I got in touch with David Kossowsky, a GIS mapper, cartographer and graphic designer, to find out more about the work of Bio.Diaspora and some of the visualisations they have been working on. This image shows a visualisation of the global airline transportation network consisting of all commercial flights worldwide.

Tools For Teaching This is the interface students use to complete the lessons you prepare. The “table” displays the list of artifacts used in the lesson. When a student clicks on an artifact, it is loaded into the viewer. Wind Map An invisible, ancient source of energy surrounds us—energy that powered the first explorations of the world, and that may be a key to the future. This map shows you the delicate tracery of wind flowing over the US. The wind map is a personal art project, not associated with any company. We've done our best to make this as accurate as possible, but can't make any guarantees about the correctness of the data or our software. Please do not use the map or its data to fly a plane, sail a boat, or fight wildfires :-)

Periodis Web - Maps to be Used for the History of Europe Periodis Web - A Historical Atlas and Gazetteer of Europe from Year 1 to 2000 Europe in Year 2000 Europe in Year 1900

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