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The Ancient Japanese

The Ancient Japanese
Jomon Period: 10,000 B.C. – 400 BC Stable living patterns began to appear in Japan with the arrival of the Jomon people around 10,000 B.C. People during this period began to make open-pit fired clay vessels and decorated them with patterns made by pressing wet clay with unbraided or braided sticks and plaited cord. The pottery techniques of the Jomon were very advanced and characteristic of Neolithic cultures although the Jomon were a Mesolithic, Middle Stone Age, people. The period is named after their pottery methods as the word Jomon means "patterns of plaited cord". The pottery found during this period suggest the Jomon people led a sedentary or at least semi-sedentary lifestyle as pottery is easily breakable and not much use to hunter gatherers who are always on the move. The Jomon period is typically divided into six different eras; the Incipient, Initial, Early, Middle, Late, and Final periods. Photos of Jomon period artifacts Yayoi Period: 400 BC – AD 250 Nara Period: 710 – 794

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