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List of mythologies

List of mythologies
This is a list of mythologies of the world, by culture and region. Mythologies by region[edit] Africa[edit] Central Africa[edit] East Africa[edit] Horn of Africa[edit] Somali mythology North Africa[edit] West Africa[edit] Southern Africa[edit] Arctic[edit] overlaps with North Asia, Northern Europe and North America. Asia[edit] Southwestern Asia[edit] Middle East, Persia, Anatolia, Caucasus. Ancient Medieval to Modern South Asia[edit] East Asia[edit] Southeast Asia[edit] Central and Northern Asia[edit] (overlaps with Eastern and Northern Europe) Australia and Oceania[edit] Europe[edit] Classical Antiquity[edit] Northern Europe[edit] Eastern Europe[edit] Southern Europe[edit] Western Europe[edit] North Caucasus[edit] Nart saga (Covers Abazin, Abkhaz, Circassian, Ossetian, Karachay-Balkar and Chechen-Ingush mythologies)Ossetian mythologyVainakh mythology (Covers Chechen and Ingush mythology) South Caucasus/Transcaucasia[edit] British Isles[edit] Americas[edit] Mesoamerica[edit] Caribbean[edit] Haitian mythology Bronze Age

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mythologies

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List of deities This is an index to polytheistic deities of the different religions, cultures and mythologies of the world, listed by type and by region. This is not a list of names or epithets of gods in modern monotheistic religions, for which see "Names of God". For deified individuals see "List of people who have been considered deities", "Apotheosis" and "Imperial cult". Lugbara mythology The Lugbara live in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda. In Lugbara mythology, Adroa appeared in both good and evil aspects; he was the creator god and appeared on Earth as a human who was near death. He was depicted as a very tall white man with only one half of a body, missing one eye, one leg, etc. His children were called the Adroanzi. The Adroanzi were nature gods of specific rivers, trees and other sacred wild areas. At night, they followed people and protected them from animals and bandits as long as they did not look over their shoulder to ensure that an Adroanzi was following; if the person did so, the Adroanzi promptly killed him or her.

List of Germanic deities In Germanic paganism, the indigenous religion of the ancient Germanic peoples that inhabited Germanic Europe, there were a number of different gods and goddesses. Germanic deities are attested from numerous sources, including works of literature, various chronicles, runic inscriptions, personal names, place names, and other sources. This article presents a comprehensive list of these deities. Gods[edit] Goddesses[edit] See also[edit] Odinani Ọdinani, also Ọdinala, Omenala,Omenana, Odinana or Ọmenani is the traditional cultural beliefs and practices of the Igbo people[1] of Nigeria. These terms, as used here in the Igbo language, are synonymous with the traditional Igbo "religious system" which was not considered separate from the social norms of ancient or traditional Igbo societies. Theocentric in nature, spirituality played a huge role in their everyday lives. Although it has largely been supplanted by Christianity, the indigenous belief system remains in strong effect among the rural and village populations of the Igbo, where it has at times influenced the colonial religions. Odinani is a monotheistic[2] and panentheistic faith, having a strong central deity at its head.

22 fascinating details you probably never noticed on Bruegel’s ’The Tower of Babel’ Nowadays it’s much easier to see famous paintings because you can just google them, but there are some paintings that require a particular approach. ’’The Tower of Babel’’ by Pieter Bruegel the Elder is one of them. This masterpiece was painted in 1563, and now to admire the original you need to visit the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. When we look at the painting it seems to us that we can see everything, but actually it’s not that easy! Bruegel is known and loved for his fancy for detail. With the permission of blogger Anton Afanas’ev, Bright Side wants to share his post to help you discover some details that aren’t that easy to notice at first gaze. Asase Ya Asase Ya (or Asase Yaa, Asaase Afua[1]) is the Earth goddess of fertility[2] of the Ashanti people of Ghana.[3] She is the wife of Nyame the Sky deity, who created the universe.[4] She gave birth to the two children, Bea and Tano. Bea is also named Bia. She is also the mother of Anansi, the trickster, and divine stepmother of the sacred high chiefs. Her favoured people are workers in the fields and planet Jupiter is her symbol.

Nyame Nyame (or Nyambe, Nyankopon) is the Sky deity of the Akan people of Akanland (South Ghana), the leader of the Abosom, the Akan spirits and minor gods.[4] His name means "he who knows and sees everything" and "omniscient, omnipotent sky god" in the Akan language; and "he who does not speak" in the Luyana language.[5] Function[edit]

Celtic mythology Overview[edit] Though the Celtic world at its apex covered much of western and central Europe, it was not politically unified nor was there any substantial central source of cultural influence or homogeneity; as a result, there was a great deal of variation in local practices of Celtic religion (although certain motifs, for example the god Lugh, appear to have diffused throughout the Celtic world). Inscriptions of more than three hundred deities, often equated with their Roman counterparts, have survived, but of these most appear to have been genii locorum, local or tribal gods, and few were widely worshipped.

Scottish mythology Scottish mythology may refer to any of the mythologies of Scotland. Myths have emerged for various purposes throughout the history of Scotland, sometimes being elaborated upon by successive generations, and at other times being completely rejected and replaced by other explanatory narratives. National mythology[edit] Several origin legends for the Scots were created during the historical period, serving various purposes. One Scottish origin legend, or pseudo-historical account of the foundation of the Scottish people, appears in adapted form in the tenth-century Latin Life of St. Cathróe of Metz.

Welsh mythology The prose stories from the White and Red Books are known as the Mabinogion, a title given to them by their first translator, Lady Charlotte Guest, and also used by subsequent translators. Poems such as Cad Goddeu (The Battle of the Trees) and mnemonic list-texts like the Welsh Triads and the Thirteen Treasures of the Island of Britain, also contain mythological material. These texts also include the earliest forms of the Arthurian legend and the traditional history of post-Roman Britain. Other sources include the 9th century Latin historical compilation Historia Britonum (the History of the Britons) and Geoffrey of Monmouth's 12th-century Latin chronicle Historia Regum Britanniae (the History of the Kings of Britain), as well as later folklore, such as The Welsh Fairy Book by W. Jenkyn Thomas [1908].

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