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European Maps Showing Origins Of Common Words

European Maps Showing Origins Of Common Words
U.S. playwright Rita Mae Brown said: "Language is the road map of a culture. It tells you where its people come from and where they are going." That quote comes to mind looking at these fascinating European etymology maps of various commons words posted by reddit user sp07, which provide a kind of cultural commentary on Europe. The word for "church" shows the influence of ancient Greece: imgur/u/Bezbojnicul "Bear" appears to be influenced by Russia, where largest brown bear population in Europe can be found. Another reddit user noted that "pi" is a prefix for "beer" in several European countries while the "pi" in the Mandarin Chinese word for beer, 啤酒 pi jiu, is a loan word from Europe. "Apple" has a lot of diversity: Notice how the word in Finland and Estonia may come from a Indo-Iranian origin. "Orange" is an interesting one. "Garoful," the ancient Greek word for "rose," only remains in northeastern Italy. imgur/u/Bezbojnicul

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Etymologically Speaking... From the old Arabic word "hashshshin," which meant, "someone who is addicted to hash," that is, marijuana. Originally refered to a group of warriors who would smoke up before battle. Aaron White adds: You may want to explore the fact that the hashshshins were somewhat of a voodoo-ized grand conspiracy scapegoat cult (the very fact of their existence is impossible to confirm). They supposedly were a secret society (a la the FreeMasons) which was influential in every middle eastern court from Persia to Bangladesh. They were supposedly a brotherhood of assasins, devoted to their caballa and its secrecy, protected by an unlimited number of fanatical followers and unlimited material wealth.

An etymological dictionary of modern English : Weekley, Ernest, 1865-1954 Publisher: London J. Murray Possible copyright status: NOT_IN_COPYRIGHTLanguage: EnglishCall number: AAN-1034Digitizing sponsor: MSNBook contributor: Robarts - University of TorontoCollection: robarts; toronto Scanfactors: 159 Full catalog record: MARCXML This book has an editable web page on Open Library. The Tower of Babel << Home Page The Tower of Babel An International Etymological Database Project Participants (so far): The Russian State University of the Humanities (Center of Comparative Linguistics) The Moscow Jewish University The Russian Academy of Sciences (Dept. of History and Philology) The Santa Fe Institute (New Mexico, USA) The City University of Hong Kong The Leiden University The main goal of the project is to join efforts in the research of long range connections between established linguistic families of the world.

FASTEN SEAT BELTS 2 - Travel by Continent - Europe Fasten Seat Belts, a light hearted guide to avoid misunderstandings while travelling. An innovative way to learn languages and pick up cultural tips. Travel by Continent / Europe In the Netherlands, it is the custom on someone's birthday to... Gifts, Miscellaneous, Do's & Don'ts, Netherlands Etymological Wordnet Maintainer: Gerard de Melo References For academic use, please cite the following publications: Gerard de Melo. Etymological Wordnet: Tracing the History of Words PDF BibTeX In: Proc.

Root Words Teacher Tips I have always used root words as a quick class opener. I have even used them when my school sprang for the Sadlier-Oxford books as the two work well together. Forty years ago, way back at Millwood, my first school, the teachers developed a list of root words as part of a comprehensive 7-12 vocabulary program. We divided this extensive list of roots between grade levels and expected kids to be taught and to master about 50 at every grade level. What Languages Are the Hardest to Learn? 1036 26ShareNew There's a reason why most American students start with French or Spanish as a second language. These romance languages are somewhat similar to English and require (relatively) less time to learn than most.

Classics Technology Center: The Roots of English CTCWeb Showcase Roots of English: an Etymological Dictionary* by Prof. Eugene Cotter, Seton Hall University Download Instructions** Uninstall any earlier version of the Roots of English program downloaded prior to October 5, 1999. Click on the words "Click here to download the 'Roots of English' application" below to begin downloading. Latin and Greek Word Elements English is a living language, and it is growing all the time. One way that new words come into the language is when words are borrowed from other languages. New words are also created when words or word elements, such as roots, prefixes, and suffixes, are combined in new ways. Many English words and word elements can be traced back to Latin and Greek.

Scientists say the ways humans describe nature transcends culture and geography Kampala, Uganda At a bustling Kampala market, Desire Karakire listens to a group of young men express their frustrations over the state of their country. Like most of their peers, they’re underemployed and extremely poor—and they feel the only way the situation will change is through violent revolution. “Leadership involves blood,” says Richard Ssenyoga, 23. With Uganda’s Feb. 18 national election approaching, these sentiments of violence are exactly what youth activists like Karakire are trying to mitigate. “If violence broke out, we all have so much to lose.

Root Words, Roots and Affixes Many English words are formed by taking basic words and adding combinations of prefixes and suffixes to them. A basic word to which affixes (prefixes and suffixes) are added is called a root word because it forms the basis of a new word. The root word is also a word in its own right. For example, the word lovely consists of the word love and the suffix -ly. In contrast, a root is the basis of a new word, but it does not typically form a stand-alone word on its own. Numerical Adjectives, Greek and Latin Number Prefixes Numerical Prefixes In this page, I discuss a curious set of unusual words: adjectives and nouns for numerical values or multiples. What do you call a group of eleven musicians? An athletic competition with six events?

Lexical Distance Among the Languages of Europe « Etymologikon™ Posted by Teresa Elms on 4 March 2008 This chart shows the lexical distance — that is, the degree of overall vocabulary divergence — among the major languages of Europe. The size of each circle represents the number of speakers for that language. Circles of the same color belong to the same language group. All the groups except for Finno-Ugric (in yellow) are in turn members of the Indo-European language family. English is a member of the Germanic group (blue) within the Indo-European family.

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