background preloader

The Flipped Classroom Guide for Teachers

The Flipped Classroom Guide for Teachers
As technology becomes increasingly common in instruction at all levels of education from kindergarten to college, the modern classroom is changing. The traditional teacher-centered classroom is falling away to give students a student-centered classroom where collaborative learning is stressed. One way educators are effectively utilizing online learning and changing the way they teach is by flipping their classrooms. What is a Flipped Classroom? High school teachers Aaron Sanns and Jonathan Bergman were the first to flip their classrooms. The Flip started when these teachers began supplying absent students with an online lecture they could watch from home or from wherever they had access to a computer and the Internet, including school or the local library. While a traditional classroom is teacher-centered, a Fipped Classroom is student-centered. Unlike the traditional classroom model, a Flipped Classroom puts students in charge of their own learning. Action? Get 2 Free eBooks

http://elearningindustry.com/the-flipped-classroom-guide-for-teachers

Related:  Clase invertidaTraAMTeaching resources

How Flipped Classrooms Change from Schools to Colleges Infographic Blended Learning Infograpics How Flipped Classrooms Change from Schools to Colleges Infographic How Flipped Classrooms Change from Schools to Colleges Flipped classrooms are changing the way education is being imparted all across the US.

6 Expert Tips for Flipping the Classroom Tech-Enabled Learning | Feature 6 Expert Tips for Flipping the Classroom Three leaders in flipped classroom instruction share their best practices for creating a classroom experience guaranteed to inspire lifelong learning. Unschooling Philosophy[edit] Children are natural learners[edit] A fundamental premise of unschooling is that curiosity is innate and that children want to learn. 16 Flipped Classrooms In Action Right Now Flipped classrooms require educators to reconstruct traditional classrooms by sending lectures home and providing more face-to-face time at school, but elementary- through university-level instructors are finding good reasons to try them out. Frequently traced back to Colorado teachers Aaron Sams and JonathanBergmann, who were quick to experiment with posting videos online in 2008, the flipped classroom concept is small, simple and has shown positive results. The general idea is that students work at their own pace, receiving lectures at home via online video or podcasts and then devoting class time to more in-depth discussion and traditional “homework.”

Pros and cons of teaching a flipped classroom The concept of “flipped classrooms” has been a hot topic for the past couple of years. Can instruction be effectively delivered at home, freeing up class time for debates, projects and labs? The model flips the traditional approach of using class time for explaining concepts and homework for reinforcement. In the beginning, many teachers dove all in, but soon faced challenges. Then it started to lose favor. Anecdotally – we’re hearing it’s making a comeback. The Case for Preserving the Pleasure of Deep Reading When a minaret dating from the twelfth century was toppled in the fighting between rebels and government forces in Aleppo, Syria, earlier this spring, we recognized that more than a building had been lost. The destruction of irreplaceable artifacts—like the massive Buddha statues dynamited in the Bamiyan Valley in Afghanistan in 2001 and the ancient texts burned and looted in Iraq in 2003—leaves us less equipped to understand ourselves and where we came from, less able to enlarge ourselves with the awe and pleasure that these creations once evoked. Which is why we should care about the survival of a human treasure threatened right here at home: the deep reader. “Deep reading”—as opposed to the often superficial reading we do on the web—is an endangered practice, one we ought to take steps to preserve as we would a historic building or a significant work of art. None of this is likely to happen when we’re scrolling through TMZ.com.

7 Essential Tools for a Flipped Classroom - Getting Smart by Guest Author - classrooms, EdTech, flipped classroom By: Erin Palmer The flipped classroom uses technology to allow students more time to apply knowledge and teachers more time for hands-on education. It’s a continually changing strategy that evolves with technology. Innovative educators are usually on the lookout for the latest technology breakthroughs that will help them better organize and conduct flipped classrooms. The rise of travelling families and world-schooling World-schooling, edventuring, life-learning, whatever you call it, more parents are doing it – if the proliferation of blogs and books by families on round-the-world trips is anything to go by. Driven by a desire to spend a greater amount of time with their children, escape the pressures of work and discover new cultures and lifestyles, a growing number of parents are jacking it all in, taking the kids out of school and setting off on an adventure. Take Jo and Jamie Robins, who are two weeks into a four-month South America trip with their daughters, aged 10 and seven.

The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con In 2012, I attended the ISTE conference in San Diego, CA. While I was only there for about 36 hours, it was easy for me to pick up on one of the hottest topics for the three-day event. The "flipped classroom" was being discussed in social lounges, in conference sessions, on the exhibit floor, on the hashtag and even at dinner. 12 Myths About Student Engagement Student engagement is one of the most reliable predictors of gains in learning. We can all agree that students who actively participate in learning are more successful and satisfied with their own educational careers. Still, keeping students engaged is easier said than done. We know it’s important, and we’ve tried our hardest day in and day out to make it happen, but many students still seem disengaged. That’s why some of the oldest tricks in the book–such as grading participation and holding pop quizzes–need to be reconsidered if we want 21st century learners to stay motivated.

Flipped classroom Sito guida per insegnanti che intendono conoscere e/o utilizzare la Flipped Classroom (Classe rovesciata). Metodo che si basa su un uso intensivo della tecnologia per cambiare il modo di fare scuola. Il metodo tradizione in cui l’insegnante è il centro della classe cede il posto il posto a situazioni scolastiche in cui lo studente diventa il centro dell’apprendimento in un ambiente collaborativo. Questo metodo prevede la distribuzione delle lezioni online, lasciando agli studenti maggiore liberta nella gestione dei tempi e nei modi di fruizione e portare poi i compiti da svolgere in classe. E’ un orientamento che ha già al suo attivo una nutrita comunità. by michelebasile Jan 15

Related: