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NSA surveillance: how to stay secure

NSA surveillance: how to stay secure
Now that we have enough details about how the NSA eavesdrops on the internet, including today's disclosures of the NSA's deliberate weakening of cryptographic systems, we can finally start to figure out how to protect ourselves. For the past two weeks, I have been working with the Guardian on NSA stories, and have read hundreds of top-secret NSA documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. I wasn't part of today's story – it was in process well before I showed up – but everything I read confirms what the Guardian is reporting. At this point, I feel I can provide some advice for keeping secure against such an adversary. The primary way the NSA eavesdrops on internet communications is in the network. That's where their capabilities best scale. Leveraging its secret agreements with telecommunications companies – all the US and UK ones, and many other "partners" around the world – the NSA gets access to the communications trunks that move internet traffic. 1) Hide in the network.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/sep/05/nsa-how-to-remain-secure-surveillance

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Can the NSA and CIA use your phone to track your location? July 26, 2011, 12:43 PM — There's no need to panic, or start shopping for aluminum-foil headwear, but the super-secret National Security Agency has apparently been thinking frequently enough about whether the NSA is allowed to intercept location data from cell phones to track U.S. citizens that the agency's chief lawyer was able to speak intelligently about it off the cuff while interviewing for a different job. "There are certain circumstances where that authority may exist," even if the NSA has no warrant to investigate a the person whose privacy it is invading or global permission to eavesdrop on everyone, according to Matthew Olsen, the NSA's general counsel. He didn't come to talk about that particularly; he said it yesterday in response to a question from the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, which was considering whether he'd be a good choice to run the National Counterterrorism Center.

Do-Not-Track Movement Is Drawing Advertisers’ Fire Do Not Track mechanisms are features on browsers — like Mozilla’s Firefox — that give consumers the option of sending out digital signals asking companies to stop collecting information about their online activities for purposes of targeted advertising. First came a stern letter from nine members of the House of Representatives to the Federal Trade Commission, questioning its involvement with an international group called the World Wide Web Consortium, or W3C, which is trying to work out global standards for the don’t-track-me features. The legislators said they were concerned that these options for consumers might restrict “the flow of data at the heart of the Internet’s success.” Next came an incensed open letter from the board of the Association of National Advertisers to Steve Ballmer, the C.E.O. of , and two other company officials. “Microsoft’s action is wrong. The entire media ecosystem has condemned this action,” the letter said.

EXCLUSIVE: Owner of Snowden’s Email Service on Why He Closed Lavabit Rather Than Comply With Gov’t This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form. AARON MATÉ: We turn now to the news an encrypted email service believed to have been used by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden has abruptly shut down. The move came amidst a legal fight that appeared to involve U.S. government attempts to win access to customer information. The owner of Lavabit, Ladar Levison, wrote a message online saying, quote, "I have been forced to make a difficult decision: to become complicit in crimes against the American people, or walk away from nearly 10 years of hard work by shutting down Lavabit." Ladar Levison said he was barred from discussing the events over the past six weeks that led to his decision.

File Encryption Software AxCrypt is the leading open source file encryption software for Windows. It integrates seamlessly with Windows to compress, encrypt, decrypt, store, send and work with individual files. We have received 3,242,753 registrations, so it is tried and proven! AxCrypt is a great complement to services such as Dropbox, Google Drive, Live Mesh, SkyDrive and Box.net . The NSA’s Latest Attempt to Hack Your Computer ... And What You Can Do To Stop It Ted BaumannActivist Post Sometimes I wonder just how bad the news about government spying can get. The answer was in my inbox this morning. I quickly ran out of superlatives: Awful.

Do We Have the NSA on the Run, or Is a Much Worse Surveillance State in the Making? December 20, 2013 | Like this article? Join our email list: Stay up to date with the latest headlines via email. A Browser To Keep The NSA From Snooping On You Concern over personal privacy in the era of NSA spying revelations has reached something of a Code Orange. Earlier this summer, the Pew Research Center reported that for the first time since the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, more Americans fear an assault on their civil liberties than terrorism. But where we might have been stocking up on duct tape and canned soup a decade ago, today we’re changing our online habits: The percentage of Americans who are disabling cookies and adjusting browser privacy settings jumped 12% and 7% in the wake of the Edward Snowden leaks.

2 E-Mail Services Close and Destroy Data Rather Than Reveal Files An image of Silent Circle’s Web page, ending its e-mail. A spokesman said the company’s customers included heads of state, members of royalty and government agencies. The company will continue its encrypted phone and text messaging service.

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