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La Gamification entra en las aulas

La Gamification entra en las aulas

http://blog.tiching.com/la-gamification-entra-en-las-aulas/

Related:  Potencialidades y limitantes de la gamificaciónGamificaciónGammificaciógamificación

El qué, cómo y por qué de la Gamificación en Educación. "Gamification in Education: What, How, Why Bother? Lee, J. J. & Hammer, J. (2011). Gamification in Education: What, How, Why Bother? Gamification Design Why Gamification? Games have become the new normal. The gaming industry is already more powerful than other ways of entertainment like music or movies. An average young person will spend more than 10,000 hours gaming by the age of 21 - somewhat the time that it takes us to master any kind of skill- and yet, there's a huge engagement crisis in many other areas. 70% of US full-time employees are not motivated by what they are doing, kids spend way more time engaged with video games than they do with books, the average attention span in 2012 was less than 10 seconds and it's decreasing every year...

Videojuegos y gamificación para motivar en educación Videojuegos y gamificación para motivar en educación Juan Carlos Sánchez Aparicio Resumen Play to Learn: 100 Great Sites on Gamification Using incentives to encourage students to stay interested in educational pursuits is not a new idea. However, the incorporation of game mechanics, incentive systems, and other ideas borrowed from the game world to create a game-layer on top of existing educational systems is revolutionary, and many educators, students, and entrepreneurs are taking notice. Gamification of education can help students be more motivated and engaged, and can make it easier to remember what they’ve learned. What teacher wouldn’t love that? Enthusiastic teachers from K-12 all the way up into college have started using game-based learning techniques in their classrooms, and there are loads of learning opportunities online for students who prefer a game-like experience. Many companies are working on gamification platforms to make it easier to implement incentive programs and game mechanics in classrooms, online courses, and even in employee training and career development settings.

Teachers Take Game-Based Learning to the Next Level The days of video games being restricted to an after-school activity are quickly becoming numbered, as teachers continue to find fresh applications for game-based learning. John Kielman wrote about "Minecraft"'s impact on K–12 classrooms in an April 28 article in The Chicago Tribune, saying the game's "virtual LEGOs" motivate kids through a technology that's fun and familiar to them. Teachers have found several educational functions for the building-block game by incorporating it into lessons on ancient architecture, history and engineering, according to Kielman. And because the design of the lesson is something they're familiar with, the kids are more engaged. That's the essence of game-based learning. It's not a new concept, but educators are coming up with fresh ideas every day to interest students and motivate them to learn.

La elaboración del juego como una experiencia diseñada. Kurt Squire Abstract Interactive immersive entertainment, or videogame playing, has emerged as a major entertainment and educational medium. As research and development initiatives proliferate, educational researchers might benefit by developing more grounded theories about them. This article argues for framing game play as a designed experience. tfmgamificacion.wikispaces Skip to main content Get your brand new Wikispaces Classroom now and do "back to school" in style. guest| Join | Help | Sign In guest What is Gamification? Gamification is the concept of applying game mechanics and game design techniques to engage and motivate people to achieve their goals.[1] Gamification taps into the basic desires and needs of the users impulses which revolve around the idea of Status and Achievement. The research company Gartner predicts that by 2015, a gamified service for consumer goods marketing and customer retention will become as important as Facebook, eBay, or Amazon, and more than 70% of Global 2000 organizations will have at least one gamified application. [2] History The oldest example of gamification are Frequent Flyer Programs that airline companies offer as a part of their customer loyalty programs. Gamification was a term that was first coined in 2003 by Nick Pelling, but did not gain popularity until 2010.[3] The term gamification began to gather interest and a following in 2010 when companies such as Badgeville started using it to describe their behavior platforms.

8 Ways to Use Games in Education Gamification is found in many contexts these days, but none more prevalent than in the K-12 education environment. Classrooms are leveraging apps, point systems, leader-boards, badges, and everything between to make their content more dynamic. Truth is, gamification itself is not very new, but the tools that we have available that have increased its popularity, tablets and APIs in particular. With all of the possibilities offered by gamification, it can be difficult to determine the best way to use it.

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