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Why the 'Maker Movement' is Popular in Schools

Why the 'Maker Movement' is Popular in Schools
The maker movement is a global, DIY movement of people who take charge of their lives, solve their own problems and share how they solved them. And it's growing in schools that are searching for more authentic learning experiences for their students. Since the beginning of time, people have made things to solve problems and otherwise improve their quality of life. But previously, the amount of exposure individual projects received was limited. Now the Internet has driven projects into the limelight. "These things that used to be isolated are now shared widely," said Sylvia Libow Martinez, president of nonprofit education technology organization Generation YES and co-author of the book Invent to Learn. She shared an example of how this global movement works. From kindergarten to second grade, students traditionally make things with playdough, legos and other objects. And parents have been telling Libow Martinez that something needs to change. What schools are doing with maker education

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ReMaking Education: Designing Classroom Makerspaces for Transformative Learning The Maker movement is poised to transform learning in our schools. To counteract educational standards, testing and uniformity, this fresh approach emphasizes creation and creativity -- products and processes born from tinkering, playing, experimenting, expressing, iterating and collaborating -- and exploits new digital tools to make, share and learn across space and time, do-it-yourself (DIY) style. Museums, libraries, community centers and after-school programs have designed physical and virtual "makerspaces" to host communities of supportive peers and mentors invested in creating everything from nail polish design and webpages to jewelry and robots . . . and now, even school curriculum.

The Role Making Can Play in Education and Future Work “American kids should be building rockets and robots, not taking standardized tests.” — By Dale Dougherty Learning by Making In this post “Learning by Making” published on Slate Magazine site, Dale elaborated: “Learning by doing” was the distillation of the learning philosophy of John Dewey. He wrote: “The school must represent present life—life as real and vital to the child as that which he carries on in the home, in the neighborhood, or on the playground.” He also wrote that “education is not preparation for life; education is life itself.”Each year at Maker Faire in the Bay Area, we have an Education Day, when kids get to meet makers and see their creative projects. Making Matters! How the Maker Movement Is Transforming Education By Sylvia Libow Martinez and Gary S. Stager The Maker Movement, a technological and creative learning revolution underway around the globe, has exciting and vast implications for the world of education.

Making Space for a No-Frills Maker Space Volume 3, Issue 4, Number 4 Driving Question: No Frills Maker Spaces: What? How? Why? What's the Maker Movement and Why Should I Care? If something is worth doing, it's worth skipping lunch for. That may not be the official motto of Tracy Rudzitis's students at The Computer School in New York City, but it might as well be. On any given day, 50 of the sixth through eighth graders gather during lunchtime in the school's "Maker Space" to design their own video games, build robots, mix squishy circuit dough on a hot plate, or sew a wearable computer. Rudzitis is the digital media teacher at M.S. 245, The Computer School. When it's not lunchtime, she teaches programming, information literacy, and design to the 350-plus middle school students. While her lunchtime crew started informally, the growing maker movement has certainly helped attract more students, and push those already interested to take on more elaborate projects.

Makerspaces, Participatory Learning, and Libraries – The Unquiet Librarian The concept of libraries as makerspaces first hit my radar last November when I read about the Fayetteville Free Library’s FabLab. As I began hearing more buzz about libraries and makerspaces the first few months of this year, I decided that learning more about this concept and exploring how I might apply the elements of makerspaces to my library program would be a personal learning project for the summer. So what is a makerspace? Makerspace defines it as: Modeled after hackerspaces, a makerspace is a place where young people have an opportunity to explore their own interests, learn to use tools and materials, and develop creative projects.

How the Maker Movement Is Moving into Classrooms The Maker movement is a unique combination of artistry, circuitry, and old-fashioned craftsmanship. Certainly, learning by doing or "making" has been happening since our ancestors refined the wheel. Don’t treat making as a sidebar to an already overtaxed curriculum. As you investigate the principles behind teaching STEAM via making, you'll see sound research from many educators throughout history, including Jean Piaget who, in 1973, wrote: The Maker Space Difference: Amazing Inquiry, Shared Learning Students work with the new 3-D printer. “Is it true? Do we have a 3-D printer?” When I put our new 3-D printer in the window of the school library, not only were my own maker space students interested, but the rest of the school seemed to take note. Some of you have been curious about how this new maker space project is coming along, so here’s an update. The library unofficially opened our maker space in January after receiving all kinds of goodies from a DonorsChoose fundraiser and other grants.

Maker Movement Reinvents Education Lectures are so old school; the Maker Movement is reinventing education You’ve hit your limit of 5 free articles this month.Try our subscription options: Weekly home delivery with free shipping, access to Newsweek’s web site, and the complete online archive Launching a Makerspace: Lessons Learned From a Transformed School Library Excitement about school makerspaces has been in the air, but many educators eager to create hands-on learning spaces in their schools still aren’t sure how to get started or why it’s worth the effort. New Canaan High School librarian Michelle Luhtala recently jumped headfirst into creating a makerspace in her library and documented what she learned, how her space changed and how it affected students along the way. Her experience was very different from elementary school librarian Andy Plemmons, whose makerspace started with a 3-D printer obtained through a grant and blossomed into a core teaching resource at his school. Luhtala is blessed with a big library, but for most of her career it has been dominated by large bookshelves.

The maker movement: A learning revolution By Sylvia Martinez and Gary Stager 7/21/2014 Topics: Maker movement, Project-based learning The impulse to create is one of the most basic human drives. As far back as the Stone Age, we were using materials in our environment to fashion tools for solving the problems we encountered. And in the millions of years since then, we have never stopped creating. In fact, the rise of civilization is largely defined by the progress of technology of one kind or another.

How to Start a Makerspace When You're Broke Everyone’s Favorite Excuse I’ve had the honor and privilege of sharing with hundreds of librarians and educators about our makerspace. Unfortunately, I see many educators hold back on starting a makerspace because of funds. I’m always hearing excuses like: “I’d love to do (insert cool Maker activity) at my school, but we don’t have a budget for that.”“We can’t really afford a 3D printer right now.” Designing a School Makerspace Makerspaces, STEAM labs and fab labs are popping up in schools across the country. Makerspaces provide hands-on, creative ways to encourage students to design, experiment, build and invent as they deeply engage in science, engineering and tinkering. A makerspace is not solely a science lab, woodshop, computer lab or art room, but it may contain elements found in all of these familiar spaces.

How a School Library Increased Student Use by 1,000 Percent Listen to the full interview: Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 51:45 — 71.4MB) Subscribe: iTunes | Android | Read Transcript

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