background preloader

Neuroacoustics: The Healing Power of Sound

Neuroacoustics: The Healing Power of Sound
ALBUQUERQUE, NM—The experience of sound is at the very core of human consciousness, and it can be a powerful tool for healing, said Jeffrey Thompson, DC, at the annual meeting of the American Holistic Medical Association. For more than 20 years, Dr. Thompson has been exploring neuroacoustics and the therapeutic application of sound. His researches have led to the development of precise protocols for using sound to modulate brainwave patterns, affect sympathetic-parasympathetic balance, and synchronize the activity of the right and left brain hemispheres. “It is akin to the picking of a lock on the neurophysiologic processes that the body already uses to heal itself,” said Dr. Primordial Sounds and Self-Awareness Perception of sound begins in the womb, and it begins very early. In many respects, it is through sound that a gestating human becomes aware of itself. Physical Resonance Much of Dr. Almost everyone has seen images of a wine glass being exploded by sound. Dr. In 1973, Dr. Dr. Related:  Frequency, Light, Energy & SoundPsychologyNeuroscience

Transform your life in 10 minutes with ancient 'youthing' practice (NaturalNews) If you need more zest and zip in your life, the secret to these states and more can be found in a set of simple (yet profound) yogic exercises known as the "Five Tibetans." Developed by Buddhist monks and brought to the West in the 1930s, Tibetan yoga is a series of five movements that improve digestion and circulation while dispelling fatigue and depression. Advocates of the practice rave about the boundless energy, clarity and vitality the short daily sessions produce. And many also believe Tibetan yoga reverses the hands of time, promoting an ageless and disease free body.Yoga in general has long been associated with reduced tension, stress and anxiety in those who regularly practice. A study in the Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health found that a single 60-minute session of yoga once per week improved feelings of clarity, energy, confidence and resistance to workplace stress after six weeks of participation. - Effortless weight loss Sources:

List of unsolved problems in neuroscience Some of the yet unsolved problems of neuroscience include: References[edit] External links[edit] Serotonin And Happiness Are Regulated By Gut Bacteria - BMED Report University of College Cork (UCC) scientists have shown that brain levels of serotonin, the ‘happy hormone,’ are regulated by the amount of bacteria in the gut during early life. Their research is being published today in the leading international psychiatry journal, Molecular Psychiatry. This research shows that normal adult brain function depends on the presence of gut microbes during development. Serotonin, the major chemical involved in the regulation of mood and emotion, is altered in times of stress, anxiety and depression and most clinically effective antidepressant drugs work by targeting this neurochemical. Scientists at the Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre in UCC used a germ-free mouse model to show that the absence of bacteria during early life significantly affected serotonin concentrations in the brain in adulthood. “We’re really excited by these findings” said lead author Dr. Material adapted from University of College Cork.

Synesthesia Synesthesia is a perceptual condition in which information between the senses is blended. Our laboratory is working to understand synesthesia from three angles. First, we have collected and rigorously verified over 20,000 synesthetes (Novich, Cheng, Eagleman, 2011). To speed and standardize the study of synesthesia, we have developed a standardized battery for testing and quantifying the phenomenon at synesthete.org. For an overview and framework of the field, please see my book on synesthesia: Wednesday is Indigo Blue: Discovering the Brain of Synesthesia (MIT Press, co-authored with Richard Cytowic). Here's what Oliver Sacks writes about the book:"Twenty years ago, synesthesia - the automatic conjoining of two or more senses - was regarded by scientists (if at all) as a rare curiosity. For a quick description of synesthesia, watch lab grad student Steffie Tomson explain--as seen on Nova ScienceNOW For some of our papers on synesthesia, see:

FAQs How Energy and Frequencies Affect Your Hydration and Health| Hydra Blue Q: What is energy? Energy is defined as the ability to do work; or the potential of motion or power. It is the fundamental substance in the universe and has many different forms, including chemical, electric, magnetic, thermal (heat), radiant (electromagnetic), mechanical, sound and nuclear energy. Q: What is “electromagnetic energy”? Electromagnetic (EM) energy is the most common and useful form of energy. Q: What is EM energy made of? EM energy is made of two things: waves and particles. Q: What are "frequencies"? Frequencies are a measurement of how frequently a wave of electromagnetic energy rises and falls in one second (hertz). Q: What does "hertz" mean? The term "hertz" is a measurement of the number of complete electromagnetic waves (cycles) that occur during a period of one second (hertz = cycles per second). Q: How are EM frequencies used in electronics? All types of electronic equipment use EM energy. Q: How are EM frequencies used in the body? Q: What does "full-spectrum" mean?

Neuroplasticity - How Exercising the Brain Helps it to Grow and Repair Neuroplasticity - How Exercising the Brain Helps it to Grow and Repair Prior to 20 or so years ago the brain was thought to be rigid in many respects. The saying “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” is an example of this thinking. Our folk-wisdom saying perhaps now should be “use it or lose it” Neuroplasticity is advocating that the brain is capable of change even after childhood, on into maturity, and even old age. The theory in short is that changes can be made to the brain by strengthening the neural pathways. The scientific explanation of neuroplasticity Neuroplasticity is the brain’s natural ability to reorganise itself by forming new neural pathways and connections throughout life from childhood to old age. Brain reorganisation occurs by forming new neural pathways to bring about a needed function. For example, if damage is done in one hemisphere of the brain the other undamaged hemisphere may take over some of its functions. Brain training Meditation in brain training Conclusion

Neurological disorder MMF found to be caused by vaccines: scientific proof (NaturalNews) It is a little-known condition that can trigger persistent and debilitating symptoms similar to those associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) and fibromyalgia, but is also one that the medical profession at large is still unwilling to acknowledge. And yet emerging research continues to show that macrophagic myofasciitis, or MMF, is a very real condition brought about as a direct result of vaccines that contain aluminum adjuvants, which become lodged in muscle tissue and lead to severe neurological damage and other problems. First identified in 1998, MMF is characterized by debilitating muscle and joint pain, chronic inflammation, and incapacitating fatigue. Though clearly distinct from both fibromyalgia and MS, which are also now believed by many to be neurological conditions triggered by vaccines, MMF is similar in that it appears to involve the demyelination of the central nervous system, or the loss of the fatty layer myelin sheaths that protect nerves.

Synesthesia How someone with synesthesia might perceive (not "see") certain letters and numbers. Synesthetes see characters just as others do (in whichever color actually displayed), yet simultaneously perceive colors as associated to each one. Synesthesia (also spelled synæsthesia or synaesthesia; from the Ancient Greek σύν syn, "together", and αἴσθησις aisthēsis, "sensation") is a neurological phenomenon in which stimulation of one sensory or cognitive pathway leads to automatic, involuntary experiences in a second sensory or cognitive pathway.[1][2][3][4] People who report such experiences are known as synesthetes. Difficulties have been recognized in adequately defining synesthesia:[5][6] many different phenomena have been included in the term synesthesia ("union of the senses"), and in many cases the terminology seems to be inaccurate. Only a fraction of types of synesthesia have been evaluated by scientific research.[11] Awareness of synesthetic perceptions varies from person to person.[12]

Related: