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The amazing, surprising, Africa-driven demographic future of the Earth, in 9 charts

The amazing, surprising, Africa-driven demographic future of the Earth, in 9 charts
Traffic moves through downtown Lagos, Nigeria. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images) The United Nations Population Division, which tracks demographic data from around the world, has dramatically revised its projections for what will happen in the next 90 years. The new statistics, based on in-depth survey data from sub-Saharan Africa, tell the story of a world poised to change drastically over the next several decades. Most rich countries will shrink and age (with a couple of important exceptions), poorer countries will expand rapidly and, maybe most significant of all, Africa will see a population explosion nearly unprecedented in human history. If these numbers turn out to be right – they're just projections and could change significantly under unforeseen circumstances – the world of 2100 will look very different than the world of today, with implications for everyone. Here is the story of the next 90 years as predicted by UN demographic data and explained in nine charts. That's huge.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/07/16/the-amazing-surprising-africa-driven-demographic-future-of-the-earth-in-9-charts/

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