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Robot Revolution: Will machines surpass humans?

Robot Revolution: Will machines surpass humans?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKiXM7bUypk

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Scientists warn the rise of AI will lead to extinction of humankind (NaturalNews) Everything you and I are doing right now to try to save humanity and the planet probably won't matter in a hundred years. That's not my own conclusion; it's the conclusion of computer scientist Steve Omohundro, author of a new paper published in the Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence. His paper, entitled Autonomous technology and the greater human good, opens with this ominous warning (1) Military and economic pressures are driving the rapid development of autonomous systems. We show that these systems are likely to behave in anti-social and harmful ways unless they are very carefully designed.

Cheetah-Cub Is A Cat-Like Quadruped That’s The Fastest Bot Of Its Size We’re still a ways away from electric sheep roaming the fields pretending to bleat but robotics researchers continue to look to nature for four-legged inspiration. Meet Cheetah-Cub, a European Commission-funded research project, out of Swiss University the École Polytechnique Federale De Lausanne‘s biorobotics lab, that’s about the size of a house cat. As its name suggests, Cheetah-Cub takes its cues from feline morphology with strings replacing tendons and actuators sited in the legs to do the work of muscles. The result is a robot that runs like a cat and is, according to its inventor Alex Sproewitz, the fastest robot for its size (under 30kg). To look at it’s like a miniature and less scary version of Boston Dynamic’s terrifying Big Dog bot. The latter is likely faster, being much taller, but for a bot with a mere 0.15m leg-length Cheetah-Cub can really go some — hitting a max of 1.42m/s or almost seven body lengths per second.

Consciousness: Eight questions science must answer Consciousness is at once the most familiar and the most mysterious feature of our existence. A new science of consciousness is now revealing its biological basis. Once considered beyond the reach of science, the neural mechanisms of human consciousness are now being unravelled at a startling pace by neuroscientists and their colleagues. I've always been fascinated by the possibility of understanding consciousness, so it is tremendously exciting to witness – and take part in – this grand challenge for 21st century science.

SeeSpace InAiR: The World's 1st Augmented Television by Nam Do, Dale Herigstad, A-M Roussel We have now surpassed the $150K goal to add streaming to the list of features. And if we reach the $200K level, we will also add an Extra HDMI input and Preset Apps to InAiR. Thanks for the continued support for this project. InAiR brings you the world's first Augmented TV experience With InAir plugged in, your TV becomes an Augmented Television. You can turn any ordinary television into a new and wonderful medium, filled with rich and dynamic information from the Web.

Should I Be Afraid of the Future? About Geophysical disasters, global warming, robot uprising, zombie apocalypse, overpopulation and last but not least the end of the Mayan calendar... humanity faces many threats! Will we survive the end of this year? And if we do, what's next lurking around the corner? What is science fiction, what is science fact? Watch: MIT's Self-Assembling Robots Offer Whiffs of Optimus Prime Photo: M. Scott BrauerPhoto: M. Scott BrauerPhoto: Kyle GilpinPhoto: M. Robots master skills with ‘deep learning’ technique Robot learns to use hammer. What could go wrong? (credit: UC Berkeley) UC Berkeley researchers have developed new algorithms that enable robots to learn motor tasks by trial and error, using a process that more closely approximates the way humans learn. They demonstrated their technique, a type of reinforcement learning, by having a robot complete various tasks — putting a clothes hanger on a rack, assembling a toy plane, screwing a cap on a water bottle, and more — without pre-programmed details about its surroundings.

Connect the Dots: Open-Source Platforms Bring Ideas to Life Quickly Solution providers can bring ideas to life in days and weeks instead of months and years with easy-to-use modular IoT platforms such as Intel® Edison that remove design and innovation complexity. Getting excited about the addition of new and novel sensors to the Internet of Things (IoT) solutions is so easy that we tend to forget that the platforms that allow providers to connect to and process the information from these sensors are just as exciting – in their simplicity. In last week’s edition of Connect the Dots, we discussed some highlights from Sensors Expo, where flexible and stretchable sensors were heralded as the future, and new advances in chemical sensors were shown to solve today’s need for quick and accurate air-quality monitoring. Oddly, given the recent events in Flint, MI, simple and quick water-quality sensor solutions weren’t presented. There’s an idea, but competition is already underway in that area. Putting Prototypes on the Fast Track

Stephen Hawking Thinks These 3 Things Could Destroy Humanity Stephen Hawking may be most famous for his work on black holes and gravitational singularities, but the world-renowned physicist has also become known for his outspoken ideas about things that could destroy human civilization. Hawking suffers from a motor neuron disease similar to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS, which left him paralyzed and unable to speak without a voice synthesizer. But that hasn't stopped the University of Cambridge professor from making proclamations about the wide range of dangers humanity faces — including ourselves.

Drone boat upgraded for Atlantic crossing A year ago, Greg Holloway set out to build an ocean drone, based on the tiny Raspberry Pi $35 computer.Wired covered the start of the project, called FishPi, last summer, as Holloway was working on a Proof of Concept Vehicle (POCV), which at that time was essentially an upturned lunch container on the hull of a model ship. Now that he’s approaching the one-year anniversary, the initial testing and research is paying off, and with collaborator Al Gray he’s revealing plans for the final design to the FishPi community.“When I began the project I had the optimistic expectation of being on the high seas by now,” says Holloway.

What you need to know about artificial intelligence, and the imminent robot future Do androids dream of electric sheep? That's unclear, but I know for sure that every kid dreams of intelligent, thinking robots -- certainly every kid who goes on to work at CNET, in any case. Today, my sci-fi-fuelled childhood fantasies of a bot with a "brain the size of a planet" are closer than ever to being realised. Artificial intelligence, or AI, the practice of making a machine behave in a smart way, is already changing our world and is, by my reckoning, the most fascinating field of technology right now. But, as one professor I spoke to for this story put it, the "audacity of the attempt to build an intelligent machine" comes with a responsibility to know what we're meddling with.

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