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“Why did you shoot me? I was reading a book”: The new warrior cop is out of control

“Why did you shoot me? I was reading a book”: The new warrior cop is out of control
Sal Culosi is dead because he bet on a football game — but it wasn’t a bookie or a loan shark who killed him. His local government killed him, ostensibly to protect him from his gambling habit. Several months earlier at a local bar, Fairfax County, Virginia, detective David Baucum overheard the thirty-eight-year-old optometrist and some friends wagering on a college football game. “To Sal, betting a few bills on the Redskins was a stress reliever, done among friends,” a friend of Culosi’s told me shortly after his death. “None of us single, successful professionals ever thought that betting fifty bucks or so on the Virginia–Virginia Tech football game was a crime worthy of investigation.” Baucum apparently did. On the night of January 24, 2006, Baucum called Culosi and arranged a time to drop by to collect his winnings. Sal Culosi’s last words were to Baucum, the cop he thought was a friend: “Dude, what are you doing?” But the mission creep hasn’t stopped at poker games. Related:  Getting along with the Police

Russia Warns Obama: Global War Over “Bee Apocalypse” Coming Soon The shocking minutes relating to President Putin’s meeting this past week with US Secretary of State John Kerry reveal the Russian leaders “extreme outrage” over the Obama regimes continued protection of global seed and plant bio-genetic giants Syngenta and Monsanto in the face of a growing “bee apocalypse” that the Kremlin warns “will most certainly” lead to world war. According to these minutes, released in the Kremlin today by the Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation (MNRE), Putin was so incensed over the Obama regimes refusal to discuss this grave matter that he refused for three hours to even meet with Kerry, who had traveled to Moscow on a scheduled diplomatic mission, but then relented so as to not cause an even greater rift between these two nations. “It is clear that these chemicals have the potential to affect entire food chains. ABC commissioned world renowned environmental toxicologist Dr. Source Rating: 4.8/5 (292 votes cast) Related Posts

Court OKs Barring High IQs for Cops <br/><a href=" US News</a> | <a href=" Business News</a> Copy A man whose bid to become a police officer was rejected after he scored too high on an intelligence test has lost an appeal in his federal lawsuit against the city. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York upheld a lower court’s decision that the city did not discriminate against Robert Jordan because the same standards were applied to everyone who took the test. “This kind of puts an official face on discrimination in America against people of a certain class,” Jordan said today from his Waterford home. He said he does not plan to take any further legal action. Jordan, a 49-year-old college graduate, took the exam in 1996 and scored 33 points, the equivalent of an IQ of 125. Most Cops Just Above Normal The average score nationally for police officers is 21 to 22, the equivalent of an IQ of 104, or just a little above average. But the U.S.

Recycling: Can It Be Wrong, When It Feels So Right? Almost everything that’s said about recycling is wrong. At the very least, none of the conventional wisdom is completely true. Let me start with two of the most common claims, each quite false: 1. If either of those two claims were true, then the debate would be over. There are two general kinds of arguments in favor of recycling. Since we can’t use the price system, authorities resort to moralistic claims, trying to persuade people that recycling is just something that good citizens do. 1. My first experience with the recycling debate was in 2008, when I was asked to keynote a conference in Freemantle, Australia. The core argument was that market prices, not emotional choices or regulatory mandates, were the best guide to whether a community should try to recycle a particular material. I focused on glass, especially the kind of green glass used for wine bottles. The commodity that glass can be ground into, called “cullet,” just isn’t very valuable. There are exceptions. 2. 2.A. 2.B.

VIDEO: Driver Questions Officer at July 4 DUI Checkpoint *So who out there can provide the best method for remedying such a travesty of justice? Michael Badnarik has gone far to educate Americans as to their Constitutional rights, so if you want to keep them please check out some of his work here and share it with your fellow sovereign friends and family. via WTVR.com RUTHERFORD COUNTY, Tenn. – A man posted to YouTube video he says shows him questioning sheriff’s deputies about a July 4 DUI checkpoint. The driver said he was pulled over, bullied around and searched without consent during the traffic stop. “All this harassment because my window was not lowered enough to his preference,” the driver posted on YouTube. “I broke no laws whatsoever. Here is a great example of how to ignore the unlawful requests from law enforcement.Las Vegas DUI Checkpoint Refusal 6Share 57Share

On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs | Strike! Magazine Ever had the feeling that your job might be made up? That the world would keep on turning if you weren’t doing that thing you do 9-5? David Graeber explored the phenomenon of bullshit jobs for our recent summer issue – everyone who’s employed should read carefully… On the Phenomenon of Bullshit Jobs by David Graeber. In the year 1930, John Maynard Keynes predicted that, by century’s end, technology would have advanced sufficiently that countries like Great Britain or the United States would have achieved a 15-hour work week. Why did Keynes’ promised utopia – still being eagerly awaited in the ‘60s – never materialise? So what are these new jobs, precisely? These are what I propose to call “bullshit jobs.” It’s as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs just for the sake of keeping us all working. The answer clearly isn’t economic: it’s moral and political. I think this is actually a pretty accurate description of the moral dynamics of our own economy.

Modern&#8217;s Art | Feature | High Plains Reader Last Monday, local artist and Fargo cultural magistrate, Modern Man, held the opening of his first show in more than a decade. The last one was in at the Soap Factory in Minneapolis in the mid-90’s, but this time the HoDo and its staff were kind enough to suspend dinner service and focus on the art of the mind rather than art for the stomach for a couple of hours. The show will last through the end of May and there is a special closing Wednesday the 28th from 5-7. Modern prefers to celebrate closings and ignore openings. The show, titled “Modern Man’s Beer Man,” is made of four series of prints: one series is a set of enormous prints from the artist’s past and there are three more recent series. Walking into the dining room, the observer is met with an unmistakable sense of Warhol. After looking through the variety prints, the show reveals much more than some obscure Warholian statement on pop culture. If You Go

Freedom to Make the Right Choice NYC and ads and pedagogy Hedgehog Review The Hedgehog Review: Vol. 15, No. 2 (Summer 2013) Reprinted from The Hedgehog Review 15.2 (Summer 2013). This essay may not be resold, reprinted, or redistributed for compensation of any kind without prior written permission. n much of our social life, individual freedom has become virtually synonymous with choice. This sort of pedagogy requires considerable subterfuge, as illustrated by the City’s new teen pregnancy prevention campaign. While the “real costs” worrying the City would seem to be the impact of teen pregnancy on the public purse, that impact is unmentioned. Think again, according to the ads. And so the conundrum is resolved. See the mayor’s press release at: < Endnotes Sonja Lyubomirsky, The How of Happiness (New York: Penguin, 2008) 5.

Sarah Stillman: The Use and Abuse of Civil Forfeiture On a bright Thursday afternoon in 2007, Jennifer Boatright, a waitress at a Houston bar-and-grill, drove with her two young sons and her boyfriend, Ron Henderson, on U.S. 59 toward Linden, Henderson’s home town, near the Texas-Louisiana border. They made the trip every April, at the first signs of spring, to walk the local wildflower trails and spend time with Henderson’s father. This year, they’d decided to buy a used car in Linden, which had plenty for sale, and so they bundled their cash savings in their car’s center console. Just after dusk, they passed a sign that read “Welcome to Tenaha: A little town with BIG Potential!” They pulled into a mini-mart for snacks. He asked if Henderson knew that he’d been driving in the left lane for more than half a mile without passing. No, Henderson replied. Were there any drugs in the car? The county’s district attorney, a fifty-seven-year-old woman with feathered Charlie’s Angels hair named Lynda K. “Where are we?”

The 2005 Bankruptcy Bill: Knowing a Financial Crisis Was Imminent, Banks Lobbied Government to Pass Laws to Preserve Their Wealth Our government representatives would like us to believe that the subprime mortgage crisis(2, 3, 4, 5) could not have been predicted. The truth is, the collapse was expected and authorities were well aware that crimes were being committed. I. Introduction It is said that if you want to find the corrupt, follow the money. This catchphrase, however, cannot be used as a preventative measure; it can only be used in retrospect to punish perpetrators of a crime. In our current centralized economic system, the best way to avoid pitfalls and preserve wealth, improving lifestyle, is to pay close attention to changes in laws and be mindful of their implications. “Referred to colloquially as the ‘New Bankruptcy Law’, the Act of Congress attempts to, among other things, make it more difficult for some consumers to file bankruptcy under Chapter 7; some of these consumers may instead utilize Chapter 13…. Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention, Consumer Protection Act Signed II. Peter Schiff Was Right 2006 - 2007

PERSPECTIVE - Introvert in Wonderland Susan Cain, author of ‘Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking’. I can’t, for the life of me, make small talk. And it hinders my social life, earns me labels of ‘socially-awkward’, ‘culturally-backward’ and inundates me in advice about dating, pop-culture and conversation-starters. I take it all in before retiring to my place of Zen with a book. From childhood, our children are encouraged to speak up. Adnan R Amin is a Dhaka-based strategy and communications consultant

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