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The 5 Minute Marking Plan by @TeacherToolkit and @LeadingLearner #5MinPlan

The 5 Minute Marking Plan by @TeacherToolkit and @LeadingLearner #5MinPlan
Marking is an occupational hazard for all teachers. Whilst ‘The 5 Minute Marking Plan’ cannot do your marking for you (sadly) it will help you focus on the job in hand and help ensure you maximise your students’ learning and your own. Written by @LeadingLearner – Stephen Tierney. Download on TES Resources: Click to download the template This planner adds to a growing number of 5 Minute Plans, including: The thinking that underpins the plan: …seeks to highlight those elements of marking that have greatest impact on learning, namely: Sharing the key marking points (you may refer to these as success criteria). The time spent on marking students’ work must also help you identify common errors, so you can: Require students to correct and improve their work.Re-teach elements of the lesson, scheme of work, programme of study or syllabus to help close key gaps in students’ knowledge, understanding or skills.Inform future teaching programmes. ‘The 5 Minute Marking Plan’ Context: What each section means? Related:  Assessment (marking and feedback)Teaching and LearningDifferentiation

10 Assessments You Can Perform In 90 Seconds Good assessment is frequent assessment. Any assessment is designed to provide a snapshot of student understand—the more snapshots, the more complete the full picture of knowledge. On its best day, an assessment will be 100% effective, telling you exactly what a student understands. More commonly, the return will be significantly lower as the wording of questions, the student’s sense of self-efficacy, or other factors diminish their assessment performance. It sounds obvious, but a student is a human being with an entire universe of personal problems, distraction, and related challenges in recalling the information in the form the assessment demands. This makes a strong argument for frequent assessment, as it can be too easy to over-react and “remediate” students who may be banging against the limits of the assessment’s design rather than their own understanding. Simple Assessments The word “simple” here is misleading. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Draw what you do understand. 10.

Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to assess its level of accuracy, reliability, and bias. In 2012, my colleagues and I assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, and the results definitely got our attention. Unfortunately, over 70 percent of the students’ responses suggested that: Middle school students are more concerned with content relevance than with credibility They rarely attend to source features such as author, venue, or publication type to evaluate reliability and author perspective When they do refer to source features in their explanations, their judgments are often vague, superficial, and lacking in reasoned justification Other studies highlight similar shortcomings of high school and college students in these areas (see, for example, a 2016 study from Stanford). So what can you do to more explicitly teach adolescents how to evaluate the quality of online information?

Faculty Conversation: Carol Tomlinson on Differentiation » Articles » Curry School of Education In education circles, Carol Ann Tomlinson is known as the guru of differentiation. Her research-based work is in such high demand that she has made more than 700 presentations and keynote addresses to school districts and professional associations across the country and abroad since joining the Curry School in 1991. She has authored 17 books on the topics of differentiated instruction and curriculum, some of which have been translated into twelve languages. In this Curry conversation, Tomlinson offers her take on what makes differentiation so important for students. Carol Tomlinson What is the essence of differentiation? Tomlinson: Differentiation is an instructional approach to help teachers teach with individuals as well as content in mind. What empirical evidence exists for the effectiveness of differentiation? There is also newer research that suggests academic benefits to the model’s key principles and practices. What is the strongest argument for differentiation?

The Best Assessment Apps for Teachers and Education Teachers must assess and observe student progress every day – no matter what the subject. Mobile apps make this easier than ever, enabling teachers to harness the incredible power of real time observation and instant results. We selected some of the best assessment apps to assist you in observing and assessing student learning. Most of them are free – so try them out today! Image courtesy of Education Plus. 1. Price: Free Resource Type: App Available at: App Store and Google Play We can see why NearPod was awarded the Edtech Digest Award in 2012. Teachers -> Are you using the “Nearpod” app to allow students to interact from iPads to your Smartboards? 2. Price: £1.49 (App Store); £0.65 (Google Play) Available at: App Store and Google Play It can be hard to rely on memory to assess how much students have learned – particularly for large groups. 3. Resource Type(s): App Available at: App Store Looking for an alternative to clumsy classroom clickers? 4. Resource Type(s): App and associated website

The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction My colleague Katie Hull-Sypnieski is leading a February 1st Education Week Webinar on differentiating instruction, and I would strongly encourage people to participate. Katie’s the best teacher I’ve ever seen…. In addition, Katie and I have co-authored a piece for Education Week Teacher on the topic that will be appearing there soon (it’s appeared: The Five By Five Approach To Differentiation Success), and an upcoming post in my blog there will be talking about it, too (that two part series has also appeared). I also did a second two-part series in Ed Week on differentiation. Also, check out The Best “Fair Isn’t Equal” Visualizations. Given all that, a “The Best…” post was inevitable, and here it is. Here are my choices for The Best Resources On Differentiating Instruction: The Best Places To Get The “Same” Text Written For Different “Levels” Busting Myths about Differentiated Instruction is by Rick Wormeli. Reconcilable Differences? Deciding to Teach Them All is by Carol Ann Tomlinson.

The How's, Why's and Value of Educational Technology Educational Technology - it's a term that technically can mean anything from a pen or overhead to laptops and interactive web 2.0 technologies. Some schools and teachers use a lot of technology with their classes, some use very little. Some schools and teachers use technology very well and others don't. Some use it to do things differently and some use it to do different things. Let's explore how, why and the value of educational technology. How should it be used? There is a lot of technology out there to use. With the huge amount of hardware, software, and web apps, an educator has a lot to sort through. The lesson objectives always come first. I do a lot of projects. Technology is also a great communication tool. Technology can also be used to differentiate teaching and learning. I have also used technology for backup plans, to communicate lessons when I'm absent, and to save my back. Backup plans are extremely important as a teacher. Research/Information - the internet ('nuff said)

Anglican Schools Partnership Effective Feedback | EEF Projects The project This pilot project focused on improving teachers’ understanding and use of effective feedback. Participating teachers tried to incorporate feedback into their lessons to help pupils understand their learning goals and become able to develop strategies to reach them. Existing international research suggests that improving the quality of feedback in the classroom has the potential to improve learning significantly. The pilot evaluation had three aims. Key conclusions Effective feedback has shown promise in previous studies, but this evaluation demonstrates that improving feedback consistently is challenging. What did the pilot find? The approach is feasible and there are some indications of promise. Many teachers found it difficult to understand the academic research papers which set out the principles of effective feedback and distinguished between different types of feedback. The pilot produced valuable formative information for a potential future project.

Bloom’s Taxonomy: The 21st Century Version So much have been written about Bloom’s taxonomy; one click in a search engine will flood your page with hundreds of articles all of which revolve around this taxonomy. Only few are those who have tried to customize it to fit in the 21st century educational paradigm. As a fan of Bloom’s pedagogy and being a classroom practitioner, I always look for new ways to improve my learning and teaching, and honestly speaking , if you are a teacher/ educator and still do not understand Bloom’s taxonomy then you are missing out on a great educational resource. The following article is a summary and a fruit of my long painstaking research in the field of Bloom’s taxonomy. The purpose is to help teachers grow professionally and provide them with a solid informational background on how to better understand and apply Bloom’s taxonomy in classrooms in the light of the new technological advances and innovations. 1 – The cognitive : The intellectual or knowledge based domain consisted of 6 levels .

What Is a Differentiated Classroom? Though today's teachers generally work with single classes with students of nearly the same age, these children have an array of needs as great as those among the children of the one-room school. Thus, a teacher's question remains much the same as it was 100 years ago: “How do I divide time, resources, and myself so that I am an effective catalyst for maximizing talent in all my students?” Consider how these teachers answer that question. Mrs. All of these teachers are differentiating instruction. Hallmarks of Differentiated Classrooms In differentiated classrooms, teachers begin where students are, not the front of a curriculum guide. In differentiated classrooms, teachers provide specific ways for each individual to learn as deeply as possible and as quickly as possible, without assuming one student's road map for learning is identical to anyone else's. Although differentiated classrooms embody common sense, they still can be difficult to achieve. Portraits from Schools Mr. Mrs. In Mr.

Using Critique to develop an ethic of excellence Quite a few twitter followers have been asking me about how do we get such beautiful work from our students and others have been asking me to share ideas about critique. I have to say, there is a multitude of great blogs and useful videos on this subject, but here is some advice which I live by. Establishing a really clear, co-constructed success criteria for ongoing work is absolutely essential for students to have a platform for effective critique and a view of excellence. This can be effectively done in two ways. Exemplar work of excellence. By using exemplar work of excellence from previous students, you can pick out the key criteria for work of excellence. First timers, make sure you know what excellence looks like. If it is a new project, then the teacher should create all the elements of the learning themselves to provide a benchmark from which to agree the criteria. Learning on the Job. As teachers, we are, or at least we should be the greatest exponents of this. SOLO Taxonomy So.

Bloomin' Apps This page gathers all of the Bloomin' Apps projects in one place.Each image has clickable hotspots and includes suggestions for iPad, Android, Google and online tools and applications to support each of the levels of Bloom's Revised Taxonomy.I have created a page to allow you to share your favorite online tool, iOS, or Android app with others. Cogs of the Cognitive Processes I began to think about the triangular shape of Bloom's Taxonomy and realized I thought of it a bit differently.Since the cognitive processes are meant to be used when necessary, and any learner goes in and out of the each level as they acquire new content and turn it into knowledge, I created a different type of image that showcased my thoughts about Bloom's more meaningfully.Here is my visual which showcases the interlocking nature of the cognitive processes or, simply, the "Cogs of the Cognitive Processes". IPAD APPS TO SUPPORT BLOOM'S REVISED TAXONOMYassembled by Kathy Schrock​ Bloom's and SAMR: My thoughts

Differentiating Instruction Whether you teach first grade or AP Calculus, your class is certain to have a variety of learners. Perhaps you have some ESL/ELL students, some learning support, some emotional support, some gifted, and some very “average.” TeachersFirst has resources to help you understand and adapt for student differences, including general ideas for any and all students and for specific student needs. For Any and All Students: Browse examples Many TeachersFirst resource reviews include differentiation suggestions and practical ways a resource can help you meet individual needs. For Specific Student Needs: Autism and Aspergers Find resources and information to help you understand and work with this increasing population. Adapt-a-Strategy for ESL/ELL Adapt your existing lesson plans using these simple strategies to help ESL students. Gifted Special Ed Special Ed regulations change frequently, and many are specific to your state.

My butterfly: the sentence escalator This week’s post is my response to two excellent blog posts I read last week: Alex Quigley’s – here – and Tom Sherrington’s – here. Both posts discussed Ron Berger’s ‘ethic of excellence‘, pointing out the incredible potential of Berger’s approach to redrafting, feedback and resilience. Both posts also urged readers to watch the ‘Austin’s Butterfly’ video which exemplifies Berger’s approach: ‘Austin’s Butterfly’ was a revelation to me, the equivalent of a teaching epiphany. The gauntlet had been thrown down – I knew I had to respond right away in my own classroom. So this week I have invented and developed what I am going to dub ‘The Sentence Escalator’, a way of transforming unstructured verbal feedback into lovingly and diligently crafted sentences. The initial verbal comment is moulded into shape, extended-upon – or both – in a way that involves the whole class. Here is how my year 9s ‘escalated’ a sentence when writing from the perspective of a WW2 soldier: 1. 1. So, there you go.

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