background preloader

Tools - WikiViz

Tools - WikiViz
Related:  Data Visualising

d3.js Concept map - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - Iceweasel An Electricity Concept Map, an example of a concept map A concept map or conceptual diagram is a diagram that depicts suggested relationships between concepts.[1] It is a graphical tool that designers, engineers, technical writers, and others use to organize and structure knowledge. A concept map typically represents ideas and information as boxes or circles, which it connects with labeled arrows in a downward-branching hierarchical structure. The relationship between concepts can be articulated in linking phrases such as causes, requires, or contributes to.[2] Overview[edit] A concept map is a way of representing relationships between ideas, images, or words in the same way that a sentence diagram represents the grammar of a sentence, a road map represents the locations of highways and towns, and a circuit diagram represents the workings of an electrical appliance. Concept maps were developed to enhance meaningful learning in the sciences. Differences from other visualizations[edit]

Knoodl The 37 best tools for data visualization It's often said that data is the new world currency, and the web is the exchange bureau through which it's traded. As consumers, we're positively swimming in data; it's everywhere from labels on food packaging design to World Health Organisation reports. As a result, for the designer it's becoming increasingly difficult to present data in a way that stands out from the mass of competing data streams. Get Adobe Creative Cloud One of the best ways to get your message across is to use a visualization to quickly draw attention to the key messages, and by presenting data visually it's also possible to uncover surprising patterns and observations that wouldn't be apparent from looking at stats alone. And nowadays, there's plenty of free graphic design software to help you do just that. As author, data journalist and information designer David McCandless said in his TED talk: "By visualizing information, we turn it into a landscape that you can explore with your eyes, a sort of information map.

7 Amazing Interactive Infographics Created With HTML, CSS and Javascript Infographics (Information graphics) are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge. These graphics able to let us absorb the information in an effective way. In real life, we can easily find some in our surrounding, for example, maps, train route, signs and so on. On the internet, we can find heaps of well-designed and educational infographics, on Queness, we also featured a few and including a post about how to make one: However, in this post, we are not going to feature the common static and image based infographics. Is the Internet Awake? Visualization Taxonomies - The Extreme Presentation(tm) Method With the explosion of interest in information visualization, I find taxonomies of visualization approaches to be very useful in organizing knowledge and facilitating use of different visualization approaches. The Periodic Table of Visualization Methods, hosted by the impressive Swiss Visual Literacy project, is the most comprehensive visualization taxonomy I have seen. It divides visualizations into Data, Information, Concept, Strategy, Metaphor, and Compound Visualizations. Each of these is then classified as a process or structure visualization, and further subdivided into whether they show detail, overview, or detail and overview, and whether they support convergent or divergent thinking. Dan Roam's Visual Thinking Codex, from his delightful book The Back of the Napkin, strikes an excellent balance between simplicity and comprehensiveness. Dan RoamTHE BACK OF THE NAPKINCopyright 2008 PortfolioAvailable at www.Amazon.com

The Ultimate Guide to Mind Maps and Mind Mapping Tools What Are Mind Maps? Mind Maps are a way of visually organizing information that help you identify and understand the structure of a subject at a glance. They allow you to create logical connections between concepts that show how pieces of information fit together, providing you with a “map” of your ideas, processes, and concepts. You can use mind maps for many things such as outlining presentations, ebooks, and content plans, engaging in logical problem solving, and mapping out user experiences online and in the real world. Popularized by British psychologist Tony Buzan, mind maps differ from conventional note taking or planning by presenting a non-linear form, which is moe akin to brain storming and the way the mind creates. Buzan also argues that the mind map uses the full range of left and right human cortical skills, balances the brain, taps into the alleged “99% of your unused mental potential”, as well as intuition (which he calls “superlogic”). Mind Mapping Best Practices

Piggy Bank Piggy Bank Contributing Piggy Bank is an open source software and built around the spirit of open participation and collaboration. There are several ways you can help: Blog about Piggy Bank Subscribe to our mailing lists to show your interest and give us feedback Report problems and ask for new features through our issue tracking system (but take a look at our todo list first) Send us patches or fixes to the code Publish Semantic Web data on your web site (how-to) for Piggy Bank’s consumption Write and submit new screen scrapers for others to use Research Publications on Piggy Bank: David Huynh, Stefano Mazzocchi, and David Karger. Related research: History Licensing & Legal Issues Piggy Bank is open source software and is licensed under the BSD license. Note, however, that this software ships with libraries that are not released under the same license; that we interpret their licensing terms to be compatible with ours and that we are redistributing them unmodified. Disclaimer Credits

The science behind data visualisation | Design Over the last couple of centuries, data visualisation has developed to the point where it is in everyday use across all walks of life. Many recognise it as an effective tool for both storytelling and analysis, overcoming most language and educational barriers. But why is this? How are abstract shapes and colours often able to communicate large amounts of data more effectively than a table of numbers or paragraphs of text? In order to understand how we are able to interpret data visualisations so effectively, we must start by examining the basics of how we perceive and process information, in particular visual information. System 1 vs System 2 Daniel Kahnemann, in Thinking, Fast and Slow, introduces the terms System 1 and System 2 to differentiate between the information processing that occurs in our sub-conscious and conscious minds respectively. To better understand the differences between System 1 and System 2, consider Figure 1. Why visualisation? How we see Perceiving values Conclusion

50 Great Examples of Data Visualization Wrapping your brain around data online can be challenging, especially when dealing with huge volumes of information. And trying to find related content can also be difficult, depending on what data you’re looking for. But data visualizations can make all of that much easier, allowing you to see the concepts that you’re learning about in a more interesting, and often more useful manner. Below are 50 of the best data visualizations and tools for creating your own visualizations out there, covering everything from Digg activity to network connectivity to what’s currently happening on Twitter. Music, Movies and Other Media Narratives 2.0 visualizes music. Liveplasma is a music and movie visualization app that aims to help you discover other musicians or movies you might enjoy. Tuneglue is another music visualization service. MusicMap is similar to TuneGlue in its interface, but seems slightly more intuitive. Digg, Twitter, Delicious, and Flickr Internet Visualizations

Related: