background preloader

Everything You Know About Composting is Wrong: Mike McGrath at TEDxPhoenixville

Everything You Know About Composting is Wrong: Mike McGrath at TEDxPhoenixville
Related:  Short View

Six Famous Thought Experiments, Animated in 60 Seconds Each By Maria Popova From the fine folks at the Open University comes 60-Second Adventures in Thought, a fascinating and delightfully animated series exploring six famous thought experiments. The Paradox of the Tortoise and Achilles comes from Ancient Greece and explores motion as an illusion: The Grandfather Paradox grapples with time travel: Chinese Room comes from the work of John Searle, originally published in 1980, and deals with artificial intelligence: Hilbert’s paradox of the Grand Hotel, proposed by German mathematician David Hilbert, tackles the gargantuan issue of infinity: The Twin Paradox, first explained by Paul Langevin in 1911, examines special relativity: Schrödinger’s Cat, devised by Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger in 1935, is a quantum mechanics mind-bender: For more such fascination and cognitive calisthenics, you won’t go wrong with Peg Tittle’s What If….Collected Thought Experiments in Philosophy . via Open Culture

Managing soil carbon: Data available on Soil organic Carbon 5 Mind-Blowing Projects by College Kids College graduates may still have a tough time finding a decent job in this economy, but some students are trying to make the best use of their time in the classroom. We've rounded up five mind-blowing projects by college kids for your viewing enjoyment. Continue reading to see more. 5. Arcade Game Washing Machine File this under: top 10 student inventions. 4. Called the JediBot, this innovative Kinect-controlled robot, developed by Stanford University students, "can wield a foam sword (light saber, if you will) and duel a human combatant for command of the empire." 3. Students from Dartmouth College and the University of Bologna have developed WalkSafe, an innovative app that's designed to alert smartphone users when a car is near. 2. Believe it or not, particle engineer Paul Luckham and fashion designer Manel Torres from Imperial College London combined cotton fibers, polymers and a solvent to form a liquid that becomes a fabric when sprayed. 1.

Soil health Soil health is a state of a soil meeting its range of ecosystem functions as appropriate to its environment. Soil health testing is an assessment of this status.[1] Soil health depends on soil biodiversity (with a robust soil biota), and it can be improved via soil conditioning (soil amendment). Aspects[edit] The term soil health is used to describe the state of a soil in: Sustaining plant and animal productivity and biodiversity (Soil biodiversity);Maintaining or enhance water and air quality;Supporting human health and habitation.[2] Soil Health has partly if not largely replaced the expression "Soil Quality" that was extant in the 1990s. The underlying principle in the use of the term “soil health” is that soil is not just an inert, lifeless growing medium, which modern farming tends to represent, rather it is a living, dynamic and ever-so-subtly changing whole environment. Using the human health analogy, a healthy soil can be categorized as one: Conceptualisation[edit] Measurement[edit]

Top 10 Student Inventions You don't have to be a famous researcher or engineer to come up with the next big invention. These ten student projects prove just that. They range from a homemade nuclear reactor to a 300mph electric vehicle. Continue reading to see them all. 10. Spokesless Bicycle Engineering students at Yale University wanted to build a bicycle unlike any other, so what did they do? [Source] 9. Making a mimosa (champagne and orange juice) just got easier, with this nifty wireless automatic drink mixer, built by University of Washington students. 8. Two students from India have developed an innovative cell phone-controlled tractor. 7. Built by MIT student Nathan Linder, the LuminAIR is a robotic lamp that essentially "combines a Pico-projector, camera, and wireless computer in a compact form factor." [Source] 6. This awesome semi-automatic NERF Longshot gun was built by engineering student -- and TechEBlog reader -- Philip H. specifically for his university's Humans Vs. [Source] 5. [Source] 4. [Source] 3.

Soil Carbon: Forest soils Rare Color Footage of Depression-Era New York In the same year that The Wizard of Oz hurtled Dorothy from a black-and-white Kansas into a Technicolor Oz, Jean Vivier, a French tourist, was filming the streets of New York in all of their own glorious color. A rare 16-mm Kodachrome film from the summer of 1939 that was recently released by the Italian Romano Archives shows swinging signs advertising 5¢ piña coladas, elevated trains whizzing overhead, and boys playing in the fountain of a public park. Archivist Vincente Romano says the clips of Rockefeller Center, Chinatown, and other areas are only a portion of the film Vivier took over the course of his trip from Marseilles to the Big Apple at the close of the Great Depression. Due to its excellent longevity in dark storage, Kodachrome is a favorite of archivists, and much of even the old stuff survives today in everything from home movies to award-winning National Geographic photos. A lot has changed in New York since Jean Vivier first stepped off the S.S. Via the Huffington Post .

Soil Carbon: Overview

coffee ground + shredded leaves and earth worms by halimtakieddine Oct 1

Related: