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Flipped Classroom 2.0: Competency Learning With Videos

Flipped Classroom 2.0: Competency Learning With Videos
The flipped classroom model generated a lot of excitement initially, but more recently some educators — even those who were initial advocates — have expressed disillusionment with the idea of assigning students to watch instructional videos at home and work on problem solving and practice in class. Biggest criticisms: watching videos of lectures wasn’t all that revolutionary, that it perpetuated bad teaching and raised questions about equal access to digital technology. Now flipped classroom may have reached equilibrium, neither loved nor hated, just another potential tool for teachers — if done well. “You never want to get stuck in a rut and keep doing the same thing over and over,” said Aaron Sams, a former high school chemistry teacher turned consultant who helped pioneer flipped classroom learning in an edWeb webinar. “The flipped classroom is not about the video,” said Jonathan Bergmann, Sams’ fellow teacher who helped fine tune and improve a flipped classroom strategy.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/05/flipped-classroom-2-0-mastery-levelcomptenecy-learning-with-videos/

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Outsourced Lectures Raise Concerns About Academic Freedom - Technology By Steve Kolowich S tudents at Massachusetts Bay Community College this year got a rare opportunity to take a computer-science course designed and taught online by some of the top professors in the field. The 17 students in a programming course at MassBay's Wellesley Hills campus watched recorded lectures and completed online homework assignments created by professors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and offered as a massive open online course through edX, a nonprofit MOOC vendor co-founded by MIT. The MassBay students met for regular class sessions with Harold Riggs, a professor of computer science at the community college.

The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. Creating Homework Tutorials (flipped classroom light) on youtube A month ago the renowned educational technology guru, Alan November, came to speak at my school in Tokyo. Though he was only visiting Seisen for a day, he pitched several ideas and encouraged us to choose a few that resonated and experiment with them. One big idea was to let students “own the learning,” and Alan not only promoted the flipped classroom idea but wanted students to be publishing to the world. He highlighted a high school math class in America that has a website full of tutorial videos to teach other students math concepts. As a third grade teacher, math seemed the simplest way to get started with this approach. At Seisen we try to embed math into our units of inquiry as much as possible, but we still use “Everyday Math” as a skills supplement.

Center for Teaching and Learning A flipped class (view image) is one that inverts the typical cycle of content acquisition and application so that students gain necessary knowledge before class, and instructors guide students to actively and interactively clarify and apply that knowledge during class. Like the best classes have always done, this approach supports instructors playing their most important role of guiding their students to deeper thinking and higher levels of application. A flipped class keeps student learning at the center of teaching. Flipped Classroom – The Year in Review So this is the first year that I implemented the Flipped Classroom model with my students. And before I go into the details, let me just say that I am never going back to the Stand and Deliver model that so many teachers are reluctant to alter in any way. When I decided to flip my classroom, I knew it would be a lot of planning and work ahead of time. I am still aware that I will always have to be ahead of the students now that I am making changes for next year, including video editing and changing scope and sequence. This has helped me this year because, otherwise, I would have walked in each day with a general sense of what the topic was and just winged it.

Social Development Theory (Vygotsky) Summary: Social Development Theory argues that social interaction precedes development; consciousness and cognition are the end product of socialization and social behavior. Originator: Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934). Key terms: Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), More Knowledgeable Other (MKO) The flipped classroom: in elementary school, too? - DreamBox Learning By @DreamBox_Learn on March 3rd, 2014 High school chemistry teachers, Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams have been given credit for inventing the flipped classroom, but they don’t make that claim. The teachers credit Maureen Lage, Glenn Platt, and Michael Treglia (2000) for their research article “Inverting the Classroom” A Gateway to Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment.” No matter who began it, classroom flipping is rising in popularity. According to the Flipped Learning Network membership on its social media site rose from 2,500 teachers in 2011 to 9,000 teachers in 2012.

Before and After the Flipped Class This is the first in a short series of guest posts. Each guest will be sharing their story of transformation. Each illustrates how one teacher transformed their classroom and their teaching practice. These illustrate how I see the flipped class as a way TO the "answers" facing educators. The 5 Minute Lesson Plan *Updated* 28th October 2014 The 5 Minute Lesson Plan is now available in digital format! This means you can now create quick lesson plans online. Read my blog announcement here or go straight to test the software out here now! Center for Teaching and Learning What is “flipping”? Flipping the classroom is a “pedagogy-first” approach to teaching. In this approach in-class time is “re-purposed” for inquiry, application and assessment in order to better meet the needs of the individual learners. Students gain control of the learning process through studying course material outside of class, using readings, pre-recorded video lectures (using technology such as Panopto), or research assignments. During class time, instructors facilitate the learning process by helping students work through course material individually and in groups.

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