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Flipped Classroom 2.0: Competency Learning With Videos

Flipped Classroom 2.0: Competency Learning With Videos
The flipped classroom model generated a lot of excitement initially, but more recently some educators — even those who were initial advocates — have expressed disillusionment with the idea of assigning students to watch instructional videos at home and work on problem solving and practice in class. Biggest criticisms: watching videos of lectures wasn’t all that revolutionary, that it perpetuated bad teaching and raised questions about equal access to digital technology. Now flipped classroom may have reached equilibrium, neither loved nor hated, just another potential tool for teachers — if done well. “You never want to get stuck in a rut and keep doing the same thing over and over,” said Aaron Sams, a former high school chemistry teacher turned consultant who helped pioneer flipped classroom learning in an edWeb webinar. “The flipped classroom is not about the video,” said Jonathan Bergmann, Sams’ fellow teacher who helped fine tune and improve a flipped classroom strategy.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/05/flipped-classroom-2-0-mastery-levelcomptenecy-learning-with-videos/

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Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped-classroom model, or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. It is a great first step in reframing the role of the teacher in the classroom. It fosters the "guide on the side" mentality and role, rather than that of the "sage of the stage." It helps move a classroom culture towards student construction of knowledge rather than the teacher having to tell the knowledge to students. Beyond the Basics of the Flipped Classroom E-Learning | Feature Beyond the Basics of the Flipped Classroom Flipped learning has been around long enough now for teachers to figure out their own variations. Here are seven tweaks to the flip worth trying in your classroom.

The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. - 30 Online Multimedia Resources for PBL and Flipped Classrooms by Michael Gorman 1 Comment May 28, 2012 By: Michael Gorman May 28 Written by: 5/28/2012 12:30 AM ShareThis

To Flip Or Not Flip? To flip or not to flip? That is not the essential question. In assessing the optimal classroom dynamics, I would argue that we need to take a good look at what our classrooms look like right now, what activities our students gain the most from, what we wished we had more time for, and what things about our class we wish we could eliminate. Do I flip: yes. Would I recommend it: enthusiastically. But let’s start by rewinding for a minute, to my 2009 AP Calculus class.

The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos. Social Development Theory (Vygotsky) Summary: Social Development Theory argues that social interaction precedes development; consciousness and cognition are the end product of socialization and social behavior. Originator: Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934). Key terms: Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), More Knowledgeable Other (MKO)

Flip your classroom with Voicethread In this webinar, community college instructor, Michelle Pacansky-Brock, will demonstrate how she used VoiceThread to flip her lecture-based art history class. The foundation of the “flipped classroom” model is a series of mobile lectures paired with formative assessments that students complete prior to coming to class. VoiceThread is a single, easy to use tool that masterfully delivers mobile content with voice, visuals, and video and invites students to participate in engaging assessment activities. This model empowers an instructor use class time on the topics that matter to students. With passive listening taking place outside of class, students become active participants and engage in discussion, debate, and critique to foster higher order thinking skills. The mobile lectures provide the flexibility to pause, rewind, and learn in a way that meets individual needs.

7 Fabulous iPad Apps to Create Short Animated Lessons for Your Flipped Classroom Today, however, I am sharing with you a set of some wonderful apps that you can use to create short video lessons and tutorials to share with your students. You can also use them to : Easily explain a range of topics from math to chemistry to music theory to basket weaving.Attach a personal message to any travel photos you want to shareDiagram offensive and defensive strategies for sportsGrade student work with commentary explaining the reasoning behind their performanceImplement a “flipped classroom” Showcase your tutorials online and share your knowledge with your students, friends, family, or the world! I have meticulously handpicked the apps mentioned below and only included what I personally see as the best available out there. 1- Educreations

9 Video Tips for a Better Flipped Classroom Flipped Classroom | November 2013 Digital Edition 9 Video Tips for a Better Flipped Classroom Early adopters share how schools can find success with teachers and students alike--even when the technology seems as topsy-turvy as the lessons. In 2007, when Colorado high school teachers Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams began experimenting with recording their lectures in order to spend class time on deeper face-to-face learning with students, they probably didn't foresee the major movement that would grow up around what came to be called the flipped classroom. But six years later, the growth in interest remains exponential, suggesting this is far more than a fad. Just since January 2012, the number of active members on the Flipped Learning Network's Ning site has grown from 2,500 to more than 15,000.

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