background preloader

The Shape of Life

The Shape of Life
Related:  Sci-e-nceZoology

Cell Models For life all cells have basic needs. Cells have diverged in their structure and function to accommodate these survival requirements. Here are some KEY TERMS to help you think, explore and search for similarities and significant differences that have become the characteristics of eukaryote (animal, plant) and prokaryotic (bacteria) cells. Examples might be searching: eukaryote prokaryote reproduction or animal plant cell energy. Reproduction / cell division Energy trapping, storage and consumption Form / shape / structure Cell specialization Compartmentalization of cell functions Communication within and beyond the cell Cell / organism survival The Shape of Life This relatively obscure series (2002) is a real find. 7 hour long episodes tell the story of primarily invertebrates of the sea (sponges, anemones, flatworms, molluscs, arthropods, jellyfish, sea stars, etc...) over the course of time and how we relate and in some cases depend on these seemingly lowly creatures. Amazing video footage and computer graphics clearly explain everything. The scope of the video is worldwide. This is documentary film-making at its best. It's a shame it's not more widely known because it is easily as good as (better than, IMHO) PBS/BBC documentaries on the same subject. It covers the evolution of life on earth by explaining the gradual changes in anatomy (invertebrates to vertebrates, etc). Fascinating information, first-class photography and graphics, and some of the weirdest-looking creatures you have ever seen! After seeing this, you will probably have a renewed and more profound understanding of what the animal kingdom represents.

Education Resources STEM and Osteology Information Education is the number one priority of SKELETONS: Museum of Osteology. Here you will find useful information to enhance your visit. Feel free to download the complete guide to reading animal skulls. How to "Read" a Skull: Teeth Mammals, as well as some reptiles, amphibians and fish, have teeth. How to "Read" a Skull: Beaks The beak of a bird is an extension of its skull and is designed for feeding. How to "Read" a Skull: Eye Placement and Size What do the eye sockets of a skull tell you about an animal? How to "Read" a Skull: Horns and Antlers Horns or antlers found on a skull bear evidence of how an animal communicated, defended its self and possibly the animals sex. How to "Read" a Skull: Pathology The pathology of a skull can tell you what may have caused an animals death. How to Identify a Skull When using skulls in education, the first question usually asked is "What kind of skull is that"?

Interactive Ear tool showing how the ear works by Amplifon The ear is the organ which controls hearing and balance, allowing us to understand our surroundings and position ourselves correctly. It is split into three parts: outer, middle and inner. This guide will take you through each part of the ear in turn, answering those essential questions – what are the parts, what do they do, and how? Pinna Helix Antihelix Concha Antitragus Lobe Cartilage Temporal Muscle (Temporalis) Temporal Bone Semicircular Canals Ganglia of the Vestibular Nerve Facial Nerve Ear Canal (External acoustic meatus) Mastoid Process Internal Jugular Vein Styloid Process Internal Cartoid Artery Eardrum (Tympanic Membrane) Auditory Tube (Eustachian Tube) Outer Ear – Welcome to the Interactive Ear! This is the part of the ear that people can see, and funnels sound into your ear canal. The rim of the pinna. A curved panel of cartridge. Bowl-shaped part of pinna. The small, hard bump above your ear lobe. The earlobe contains a large blood supply, helping to keep the ears warm.

Big History Project Join us! The Big History Project is not a for-profit program. Your engagement will exclusively benefit teachers and students around the world. Teaching the course It's easy to teach Big History — all you have to do is register, set up a class, and go! Start a pilot Schools that want to work with us have the option of joining a small group committed to delivering Big History. Create a movement Districts and networks that want to explore how to bring Big History to life should reach out to discuss partnering with us. Teach the course All of our courseware is free, online, and available to any teacher. Not an educator? Check out our public course — a four-to-six hour tour of Big History. Questions about the Big History Project?

the Shape of Life | The Story of the Animal Kingdom DNA from the Beginning - An animated primer of 75 experiments that made modern genetics. Interaktív irodalomkönyv Science Underground | How Animals Gossip Dogs bark. Cats meow. Ducks quack. These noises might not seem like much to us, but animals are communicating. We’ve been intrigued with communicating with animals since the classic movie Dr. But the fascinating part about animal language is time. All this is to say it that the chirps or barks you hear are full of compressed information. Find out more about animal language here: Chasing Dr. explore 3d cell structures

Related: