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Anatomical terms of motion

Anatomical terms of motion
In general, motion is classified according to the anatomical plane it occurs in. Flexion and extension are examples of angular motions, in which two axes of a joint are brought closer together or moved further apart. Rotational motion may occur at other joints, for example the shoulder, and are described as internal or external. Other terms, such as elevation and depression, refer to movement above or below the horizontal plane. Many anatomical terms derive from Latin terms with the same meaning. Classification[edit] Motions are classified after the anatomical planes they occur in, although movement is more often than not a combination of different motions occurring simultaneously in several planes. Apart from this motions can also be divided into: Linear motions (or translatory motions), which move in a line between two points. The study of movement is known as kinesiology. Abnormal motion[edit] General motion[edit] Flexion and extension[edit] Abduction and adduction[edit] Rotation[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anatomical_terms_of_motion

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Joint A joint or articulation (or articulate surface) is the location at which bones connect.[1][2] They are constructed to allow movement (except for skull, sacral, sternal, and pelvic bones) and provide mechanical support, and are classified structurally and functionally.[3][page needed] Classification[edit] Joints are mainly classified structurally and functionally. Structural classification is determined by how the bones connect to each other, while functional classification is determined by the degree of movement between the articulating bones. In practice, there is significant overlap between the two types of classifications. Anatomical terms of location Standard anatomical terms of location deal unambiguously with the anatomy of animals, including humans. Furthermore, the terms are not language-specific, so with little or no translation, they can be understood by all zoologists. While these terms are standardized within specific fields of biology, there are unavoidable, sometimes dramatic, differences between some disciplines. For example, differences in terminology remain a problem that, to some extent, still separates the terminology of human anatomy from that used in the study of various other zoological categories.

Anatomy Anatomy is the branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of animals and their parts; it is also referred to as zootomy to separate it from human anatomy. In some of its facets, anatomy is related to embryology and comparative anatomy, which itself is closely related to evolutionary biology and phylogeny.[1] Human anatomy is one of the basic essential sciences of medicine. Definition[edit] Human compared to elephant frame Anatomical chart by Vesalius, Epitome, 1543 The discipline of anatomy can be subdivided into a number of branches including gross or macroscopic anatomy and microscopic anatomy.[4] Gross anatomy is the study of structures large enough to be seen with the naked eye, and also includes superficial anatomy or surface anatomy, the study by sight of the external body features.

3000 Years Of Women’s Beauty Standards In A 3 Minute Video Beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder, but our idea of beauty over the past few decades has most definitely been programmed into us. Our youth are growing up with mass amounts of marketing around them, as they watch television and participate in life, they are constantly bombarded with a picture of “what is beautiful.” It’s a shame how our children grow up striving to achieve that particular look, and how they can be made to feel “ugly” if they do not fit the accepted model of what our corporations have defined as beautiful. As a result, our youth are not addressing their feelings and emotions, always being taught to look outside of themselves instead of within themselves for the answer. “If tomorrow, women woke up and decided they really liked their bodies, just think about how many industries would go out of business.” – Unknown

Kinesiology A series of images that represent research (left) and practice (right) in the field of kinesiology. Kinesiology, also known as human kinetics, is the scientific study of human movement. Kinesiology addresses physiological, mechanical, and psychological mechanisms. Applications of kinesiology to human health include biomechanics and orthopedics; strength and conditioning; sport psychology; methods of rehabilitation, such as physical and occupational therapy; and sport and exercise.[1] Individuals who have earned degrees in kinesiology can work in research, the fitness industry, clinical settings, and in industrial environments.[2] Studies of human and animal motion include measures from motion tracking systems, electrophysiology of muscle and brain activity, various methods for monitoring physiological function, and other behavioral and cognitive research techniques.[3][4] Basics[edit]

Nerve Structures of the Spine Nerves control the body’s functions including the vital organs, sensation, and movement. The nervous system receives information and initiates an appropriate response. It is affected by internal and external factors (ie, stimulus). Head and neck anatomy Head and neck anatomy focuses on the structures of the head and neck of the human body, including the brain, bones, muscles, blood vessels, nerves, glands, nose, mouth, teeth, tongue, and throat. It is an area frequently studied in depth by surgeons, dentists, dental technicians, and speech language pathologists. Musculoskeletal system[edit] (a) cranium (8 bones: frontal, 2-parietal, occipital, 2-temporal, sphenoid, ethmoid), and (b) facial bones (14 bones: 2-zygomatic, 2-maxillary, 2-palatine, 2-nasal, 2-lacrimal, vomer, 2-inferior conchae, mandible). As the fetus develops, the facial bones usually form into pairs, and then fuse together. As the cranium fuses, sutures are formed that resemble stitching between bone plates.

100 Very Cool Facts About The Human Body The Brain The human brain is the most complex and least understood part of the human anatomy. There may be a lot we don’t know, but here are a few interesting facts that we’ve got covered. Nerve impulses to and from the brain travel as fast as 170 miles per hour. Ever wonder how you can react so fast to things around you or why that stubbed toe hurts right away? Ligament In anatomy, a ligament is the fibrous tissue that connects bones to other bones and is also known as articular ligament, articular larua,[1] fibrous ligament, or true ligament. Ligament can also refer to: Peritoneal ligament: a fold of peritoneum or other membranes.Fetal remnant ligament: the remnants of a fetal tubular structure.Periodontal ligament: a group of fibers that attach the cementum of teeth to the surrounding alveolar bone. The study of ligaments is known as desmology (from Greek δεσμός, desmos, "bond"; and -λογία, -logia). Ligaments are similar to tendons and fasciae as they are all made of connective tissue.

How To See An Aura: Learn To See The Hunan Aura Auras are an energy field that is present around every living creature and some inanimate objects. The aura is generated by the 7 major chakras and the 114 minor chakras in the human body. What Color Is Your Aura And What Does It Mean? Find Out Here! Your thoughts, emotions, actions, and even dietary choices can impact the aura. The aura is something like a shield. Trunk (anatomy) Trunk or torso is an anatomical term for the central part of the many animal bodies (including that of the human) from which extend the neck and limbs.[1] The trunk includes the thorax and abdomen. The trunk also harbours many of the main groups of muscles in the body, including the: The organs and muscles etc. are innervated by various nerves, mainly originating from thoracic vertebrae segments. For instance, the cutaneous innervation is provided by:

Updated map of the human brain hailed as a scientific tour de force When the German neurologist Korbinian Brodmann first sliced and mapped the human brain more than a century ago he identified 50 distinct regions in the crinkly surface called the cerebral cortex that governs much of what makes us human. Now researchers have updated the 100-year-old map in a scientific tour de force which reveals that the human brain has at least 180 different regions that are important for language, perception, consciousness, thought, attention and sensation. The landmark achievement hands neuroscientists their most comprehensive map of the cortex so far, one that is expected to supersede Brodmann’s as the standard researchers use to talk about the various areas of the brain.

Circulatory system The circulatory system is often seen to be composed of both the cardiovascular system, which distributes blood, and the lymphatic system, which circulates lymph.[1]These are two separate systems. The passage of lymph for example takes a lot longer than that of blood.[2] Blood is a fluid consisting of plasma, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets that is circulated by the heart through the vertebrate vascular system, carrying oxygen and nutrients to and waste materials away from all body tissues. Lymph is essentially recycled excess blood plasma after it has been filtered from the interstitial fluid (between cells) and returned to the lymphatic system. The cardiovascular (from Latin words meaning 'heart'-'vessel') system comprises the blood, heart, and blood vessels.[3] The lymph, lymph nodes, and lymph vessels form the lymphatic system, which returns filtered blood plasma from the interstitial fluid (between cells) as lymph. Structure Cardiovascular system

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