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Historic Shepherds Huts - on the move

Historic Shepherds Huts - on the move
A quick note to say that the excellent site dedicated to shepherds' huts - Historic Shepherds Hut ("a web based archive dedicated to record survivors and the forgotten part they once played in our country's rich agricultural past") - is heading to a new location at www.shepherdhuts.co.uk because of hosting problems. They're still in the process of moving everything across but it's worth changing your bookmarks now as they are also planning to expand the site to deal with lots of new huts which have come their way as a result of recent media coverage. Incidentally, if you have a shepherd's hut for sale, please do contact Shedworking - there were many, many disappointed readers who were very interested in the last one we advertised (including the editor of a wellknown national magazine) that I'm sure you'd find a buyer quickly. Our Monday posts are sponsored by garden2office, the Swedish garden officespecialists.Click here for more details.

http://www.shedworking.co.uk/2008/09/historic-shepherds-huts-on-move.html

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