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Human Evolution Timeline

Human Evolution Timeline
Related:  Unit 1

Introducing the Knowledge Graph: things, not strings Cross-posted on the Inside Search Blog Search is a lot about discovery—the basic human need to learn and broaden your horizons. But searching still requires a lot of hard work by you, the user. So today I’m really excited to launch the Knowledge Graph, which will help you discover new information quickly and easily. Take a query like [taj mahal]. But we all know that [taj mahal] has a much richer meaning. The Knowledge Graph enables you to search for things, people or places that Google knows about—landmarks, celebrities, cities, sports teams, buildings, geographical features, movies, celestial objects, works of art and more—and instantly get information that’s relevant to your query. Google’s Knowledge Graph isn’t just rooted in public sources such as Freebase, Wikipedia and the CIA World Factbook. The Knowledge Graph enhances Google Search in three main ways to start: 1. 2. How do we know which facts are most likely to be needed for each item? 3.

Blue Planet Biomes - World Biomes What is a Biome? A biome is a large geographical area of distinctive plant and animal groups, which are adapted to that particular environment. The climate and geography of a region determines what type of biome can exist in that region. Major biomes include deserts, forests, grasslands, tundra, and several types of aquatic environments. Each biome consists of many ecosystems whose communities have adapted to the small differences in climate and the environment inside the biome. All living things are closely related to their environment. The earth includes a huge variety of living things, from complex plants and animals to very simple, one-celled organisms.

Why Are Europeans White? The Puzzle: Northern Europeans are Uniquely Depigmented “White,” of course, is a a social designation. The question really is, “Why are northern Europeans depigmented?” Here is a map of human skin tone. The natives of northern Europe are oddly light-skinned. Most people know that it has something to do with sunlight, UV, latitude, and vitamin D. The closer you are to the equator, the darker your skin. It Has Something to do With Solar UV and Oceans UV rays produce vitamin D and reduce folate when they hit naked skin. Too much UV penetrating the skin (too pale-skinned under intense sunlight) increases Vitamin D but reduces folate. On the other hand, too little UV penetrating the skin (too dark-skinned under dim sunlight) increases folate but reduces vitamin D. And so, humans adapt very quickly to solar UV. But this explanation fails for Europe. Clearly, there once was a factor at work in Europe other than dim sunlight. Here is another map of skin tone. Skin, Hair, and Eyes: Neoteny

5 Mind-Blowing Projects by College Kids College graduates may still have a tough time finding a decent job in this economy, but some students are trying to make the best use of their time in the classroom. We've rounded up five mind-blowing projects by college kids for your viewing enjoyment. Continue reading to see more. 5. Arcade Game Washing Machine File this under: top 10 student inventions. 4. Called the JediBot, this innovative Kinect-controlled robot, developed by Stanford University students, "can wield a foam sword (light saber, if you will) and duel a human combatant for command of the empire." 3. Students from Dartmouth College and the University of Bologna have developed WalkSafe, an innovative app that's designed to alert smartphone users when a car is near. 2. Believe it or not, particle engineer Paul Luckham and fashion designer Manel Torres from Imperial College London combined cotton fibers, polymers and a solvent to form a liquid that becomes a fabric when sprayed. 1.

The Omnivorous Mind — John S. Allen In this gustatory tour of human history, John S. Allen demonstrates that the everyday activity of eating offers deep insights into human beings’ biological and cultural heritage. We humans eat a wide array of plants and animals, but unlike other omnivores we eat with our minds as much as our stomachs. This thoughtful relationship with food is part of what makes us a unique species, and makes culinary cultures diverse. Drawing on the work of food historians and chefs, anthropologists and neuroscientists, Allen starts out with the diets of our earliest ancestors, explores cooking’s role in our evolving brain, and moves on to the preoccupations of contemporary foodies. To explain, for example, the worldwide popularity of crispy foods, Allen considers first the food habits of our insect-eating relatives.

Boy finds 10,000-year-old arrowhead on New Jersey beach Noah Cordle, 10, found a 10,000-year-old Paleoindian arrow point on a New Jersey beach.Kelly-Jane Cotter/ Asbury Park Press BEACH HAVEN, N.J. – A boy playing on a New Jersey beach has unearthed a 10,000-year-old arrowhead possibly used by ancient Native Americans to spear fish or hunt mastodon. Noah Cordle, 10, and his family were vacationing on the Long Beach Island last week when he found it at the edge of the surf in the community of Beach Haven. It was sharp enough that it hurt as it hit his leg. He thought it was a crab until he picked up the object. The Springfield, Virginia family contacted the Archaeological Society of New Jersey to check it out. The president, Greg Lattanzi, who is also a curator at the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton, tells the Asbury Park Press that the arrow point probably dates back 8,000 to 11,000 years. "I was basically blown away," he said. Only one other in the collection washed up on a beach. "Jasper is a yellow-brown stone," Lattanzi told the paper.

Y-Chromosomal Adam Lived 208,300 Years Ago, Says New Study According to new research reported in the European Journal of Human Genetics, our most recent common ancestor – the so-called Y-chromosomal Adam – lived on the Earth 208,300 years ago. Creation of Adam, detail. By Michelangelo Buonarroti, 1510. Dr Eran Elhaik from the University of Sheffield and his co-authors used conventional biological models to show that Y-chromosomal Adam is 8,300 years older than scientists originally believed. “We can say with some certainty that modern humans emerged in Africa a little over 200,000 years ago,” Dr Elhaik said. The findings contradict a recent study – published in the American Journal of Human Genetics in February 2013 – which had claimed the human Y chromosome originated in a different species through interbreeding which dates Adam to be twice as old. “In fact, their hypothesis creates a sort of space-time paradox whereby the most ancient individual belonging to Homo sapiens species has not yet been born. Eran Elhaik et al. 2014.

The future of UI Synopsis It's 10 years since Minority Report hit our screens. The film's science adviser and inventor John Underkoffler demos g-speak – the real-life version of the eye-popping, tai chi-meets-cyberspace computer interface that Tom Cruise used to whoosh through video clips of future crimes. About the Speaker Remember the data interface from Minority Report? untitled Source: Jouni A. Smed Introduction Much of the discussion of out-of-body experiences has centered around the recounting of experiences and speculation on the nature of those experiences. Some articles have questioned whether the experiences are of an hallucinatory nature or purely a function of biochemical processes that occur in the brain, and, at the other extreme, some have linked them with notions of the existence of an immortal soul and other ideas generally associated with religious interpretations of human existence. Most readers are intrigued by the thought of being able to have and control OBEs, and see them as a potentially interesting experience, though some smaller number of people taking part in discussions are interested in trying to figure out their nature and function and their possible implications for the understanding of what it means to be fully human. What is an out-of-the-body experience? Not all OBEs occur spontaneously. What are ESP, PK and psi? What is animism? G.

Before Civilization - Ancient Civilizations for Kids Early humans showed another major sign of intelligence about 35,000 years ago. Humans began to draw on the walls of caves—probably other places too, but it has been preserved in caves. Cave paintings often depict hunting scenes. This is some of the first artwork and also an early attempt at written communication. Development of Agriculture The most important development in human history is the development agriculture, which is another word for farming. Corn is a good example of domestication. Humans have lived in Africa longer than anywhere else, but many African societies adopted farming much later than other parts of the world. The soil near rivers is very fertile—or full of plant food and good for growing. Agriculture Brings Changes Farming had other effects on lifestyle and society. The society that farming created forced people to interact in new ways. The world was rapidly changing and people finally had time to settle down and think about the world around them. A New Way of Life

Top 10 Student Inventions You don't have to be a famous researcher or engineer to come up with the next big invention. These ten student projects prove just that. They range from a homemade nuclear reactor to a 300mph electric vehicle. Continue reading to see them all. 10. Spokesless Bicycle Engineering students at Yale University wanted to build a bicycle unlike any other, so what did they do? [Source] 9. Making a mimosa (champagne and orange juice) just got easier, with this nifty wireless automatic drink mixer, built by University of Washington students. 8. Two students from India have developed an innovative cell phone-controlled tractor. 7. Built by MIT student Nathan Linder, the LuminAIR is a robotic lamp that essentially "combines a Pico-projector, camera, and wireless computer in a compact form factor." [Source] 6. This awesome semi-automatic NERF Longshot gun was built by engineering student -- and TechEBlog reader -- Philip H. specifically for his university's Humans Vs. [Source] 5. [Source] 4. [Source] 3.

Six Famous Thought Experiments, Animated in 60 Seconds Each By Maria Popova From the fine folks at the Open University comes 60-Second Adventures in Thought, a fascinating and delightfully animated series exploring six famous thought experiments. The Paradox of the Tortoise and Achilles comes from Ancient Greece and explores motion as an illusion: The Grandfather Paradox grapples with time travel: Chinese Room comes from the work of John Searle, originally published in 1980, and deals with artificial intelligence: Hilbert’s paradox of the Grand Hotel, proposed by German mathematician David Hilbert, tackles the gargantuan issue of infinity: The Twin Paradox, first explained by Paul Langevin in 1911, examines special relativity: Schrödinger’s Cat, devised by Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger in 1935, is a quantum mechanics mind-bender: For more such fascination and cognitive calisthenics, you won’t go wrong with Peg Tittle’s What If….Collected Thought Experiments in Philosophy . via Open Culture

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