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EWICON bladeless wind turbine generates electricity using charged water droplets

EWICON bladeless wind turbine generates electricity using charged water droplets
Dutch researchers have developed the EWICON, a bladeless windmill with no moving parts that produces electricity by pushing charged water droplets into the wind Image Gallery (2 images) Wind energy may be one of the more sustainable sources of power available, but the spinning blades of conventional wind turbines require regular maintenance and have attracted criticism from bird lovers. That might explain why we've seen wind turbine prototypes that enclose the blades in a chamber or replace them entirely with a disc-like system. But researchers in the Netherlands set out to eliminate the need for a mechanical component entirely and created the EWICON, a bladeless wind turbine with no moving parts that produces electricity using charged water droplets. Where most wind turbines generate electricity through mechanical energy, the EWICON (short for Electrostatic WInd energy CONvertor) creates potential energy with charged particles – in this case, water droplets. About the Author

http://www.gizmag.com/ewicon-bladeless-wind-turbine/26907/

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UGE replaces 4K wind turbine with mysterious mid-range VisionAIR - (Private Browsing) Urban Green Energy (UGE) recently unveiled its newest vertical-axis wind turbine, the VisionAIR, as part of an installation at the Beijing International Garden Expo. The company confirmed to Gizmag that the VisionAIR is replacing its former 4K turbine, last seen adorning the top of an EV charging station, as its standard mid-sized option for customers. Compared with the previous model, the new turbine's design aims for better efficiency at moderate wind speeds, which UGE plans to integrate with its hybrid energy projects.

How it Works Watch this: Watch 3 actual turbines in action! SheerWind’s INVELOX Wind Delivery is simply a better way to harvest wind energy. Wind is captured at the top of the funnel shaped INVELOX system. The omnidirectional intake area allows wind collection from any directionWind is funneled through the systemWind is concentrated and further accelerated in the Venturi Effect* section of the INVELOX system. *The Venturi effect is the phenomenon that occurs when a fluid that is flowing through a pipe is forced through a narrow section, resulting in a pressure decrease and a velocity increase.Wind is delivered to the turbine/generators to convert the accelerated wind to electrical power.

New technology turns manure into clean water Imagine something that can turn cow manure into clean water, extract nutrients from that water to serve as fertilizer and help solve the ever-present agricultural problem of manure management. Technology that has its roots firmly planted at Michigan State University is under development and near commercialization that can do all of that. And then some. WWII veteran creates bird-friendly wind turbine Military veteran Raymond Green created the Catching Wind Power prototype at an estimated cost of US$550 Image Gallery (17 images) World War II veteran Raymond Green, an 89 year old resident of Jackson, California, has created a working prototype of a "bladeless" wind turbine which is bird and bat-friendly, and very quiet in operation. Though still in development at present, Green intends his design to be produced in various sizes, from smaller personal versions to much larger turbines which could be implemented in wind farms.

World-first wooden wind turbine starts spinning in Germany The prototype TimberTower constructed in Hannover, Germany Image Gallery (6 images) Getting a wind turbine to a decent height to allow it to reach stronger winds than those found closer to the ground generally means sitting them atop a tower. Newly Invented Off-Grid Solar Grill Can Store Energy and Cook at Night Without Electricity It will store the heat energy for up to 25 hours released as a convective heat at temperatures of 450 degrees F. Barbecuing is one of the greatest pastimes for many, but it certainly isn’t one of our most environmentally friendly. Whether you prefer charcoal, wood chips or propane, grilling releases emissions and contributes to poor air quality. Up until now, solar powered grilling has required, as you might expect, the sun, which means traditional fuel-fired grills are required after sunset. But new solar technology developed by MIT professor David Wilson could bring a nighttime solar-powered grill to the market very soon; an invention also of great benefit to those in developing nations who rely on wood to cook all their food. In the future, these could be commonly used for backyard cooking at home:

Quantum dot breakthrough could lead to cheap spray-on solar cells Researchers at the University of Toronto have manufactured and tested a new type of colloidal quantum dots (CQD), that, unlike previous attempts, doesn't lose performance as they keep in contact with oxygen. The development could lead to much cheaper or even spray-on solar cells, as well as better LEDs, lasers and weather satellites. Quantum dot solar cells The Sky Is the Limit for Wind Power Wind turbines on land and offshore could readily provide more than four times the power that the world as a whole currently uses. Throw in kites or robot aircraft generating electricity from sky-high winds and the world could physically extract roughly 100 times more power than presently employed—and the climatic consequences remain minimal. Two new computer-model analyses suggest there are few limits to the wind's potential. Although "there are physical limits to the amount of power that can be harvested from winds, these limits are well above total global energy demand," explains climate-modeler Kate Marvel of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, who led the analysis published September 9 in Nature Climate Change.

Saphonian bladeless turbine boasts impressive efficiency, low cost The Saphonian bladeless wind turbine draws inspiration from the design of a ship's sails Image Gallery (2 images) Tunisian green energy startup Saphon Energy has created a new bladeless wind turbine which draws inspiration from the design of a ship’s sails, and promises to convert the kinetic energy of the wind into electricity at up to double the efficiency – and half the cost – of a typical wind turbine. Dubbed the “Saphonian,” in honor of an ancient wind divinity worshiped by the Carthaginian Mediterranean culture which predated modern Tunisia, the current iteration of bladeless wind turbine is the second prototype developed by the company thus far. As illustrated by the development of the Solar Aero and Catching Wind Power bladeless turbines, there is a perceived need for wind turbines which can offer renewable energy while also avoiding the use of rotating blades, which can cause noise pollution and be harmful to birds. Source: Saphon Energy via Environmental News Network

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