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What To Do Inside the ‘Flipped Class’

What To Do Inside the ‘Flipped Class’
‘Flipping Activities’ The basic premise – students watch video lesson at home and work through problems in class. This allows the educator to advise and challenge the students inside the classroom safe in the knowledge content is delivered elsewhere. Of course, this is not a new concept, students have always been asked to prepare for the next class. So what to do in the classroom? My personal view – anything that can enhance learning. There is nothing wrong with the delivery of content with stimulating development tasks and thought provoking plenary and those educators are very successful and students learn a great deal. So what to do in the ‘flipped class’? There are some great examples of learning opportunities on the Flipped Class Network and the ideas below are just a taster of generic activities. I am well aware that techniques, like these, have been used for many years by educators across the land. Test results are up and the students are anecdotally favourable. Like this: Related:  FlendingInglés

Thoughts of a Maths Teacher Using Tech for Learning Flipped MFL lessons | My occasional ramblings 12 Jan Having read quite a few tweets and blogs (and even this ebook) about flipped learning and having had a short training session on the concept by a colleague (@twentspin) at school I became convinced that this was a more effective way of teaching and set about creating my own flipped learning lessons. With every new thing that I try in the classroom I chose to use it with one class to start off with so that I didn’t become overwhelmed and I could make errors without it affecting too many pupils. The aim, of course, will be to roll this out to other classes when I’m more confident with the technology and how the lessons should be presented. At a recent training course looking at using iPads in the classroom by @joedale I was told about the Explain Everything app by @njdixpin who assured me that it was well worth the £1.99 fee. So with the technology ready I set about producing my first flipped video. The pupils all engaged really well with the video. Like this: Like Loading...

The Flipped Classroom Guide for Teachers As technology becomes increasingly common in instruction at all levels of education from kindergarten to college, the modern classroom is changing. The traditional teacher-centered classroom is falling away to give students a student-centered classroom where collaborative learning is stressed. One way educators are effectively utilizing online learning and changing the way they teach is by flipping their classrooms. What is a Flipped Classroom? High school teachers Aaron Sanns and Jonathan Bergman were the first to flip their classrooms. While a traditional classroom is teacher-centered, a Fipped Classroom is student-centered. The Flipped Classroom model might sound like new-age mumbo jumbo to you, but it has been proven to be effective even in the most difficult classrooms. Unlike the traditional classroom model, a Flipped Classroom puts students in charge of their own learning. This means all students are not working on the same area at the same time in and out of the classroom.

The Flipped Classroom: Pro and Con In 2012, I attended the ISTE conference in San Diego, CA. While I was only there for about 36 hours, it was easy for me to pick up on one of the hottest topics for the three-day event. The "flipped classroom" was being discussed in social lounges, in conference sessions, on the exhibit floor, on the hashtag and even at dinner. People wanted to know what it was, what it wasn't, how it's done and why it works. Others wanted to sing its praises and often included a vignette about how it works in their classroom and how it transformed learning for their students. What It Is According to the description on ASCD's page for the newly released book, Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day, by flipped-classroom pioneers Aaron Sams and Jonathan Bergmann, "In this model of instruction, students watch recorded lectures for homework and complete their assignments, labs, and tests in class." What It Isn't Why It Works Why It Doesn't Work Why It's Nothing New Why It Matters

Classroom Management and the Flipped Class | Edutopia Editor's Note:This post was co-authored by Aaron Sams, CEO of Sams Learning Designs, LLC and founding member of the Flipped Learning Network. Let's face it. We teachers spend far too much time and energy trying to keep students quiet so that they can listen to us. We have taken countless courses and workshops on classroom management in our careers, and it seems that the underpinning goal of classroom management is for teachers to keep kids quiet so that they can learn. What if the goal of class was for the students to actively engage in the content and participate in tangible ways in the learning process? Noise Is Good As we pioneered the flipped class, we got away from the front of the room and got a whole different perspective on what classroom management could look like. As we did this, the dynamics of the classroom dramatically changed. But, as with any change, we found some new challenges. 4 New Management Issues Who Gets My Time? Redirecting Off-Task Kids Becomes More Important

10 Common Misconceptions About The Flipped Classroom 10 Common Misconceptions About The Flipped Classroom by Kelly Walsh, emergingedtech.com What have you heard about the flipped classroom? That it’s just the latest education fad? That it only works for certain academic subjects? It’s not uncommon to come across references in the web media to poorly informed and misconstrued ideas like these. Following are 10 of the most common erroneous ideas about flipped teaching and learning that you may come across, and a brief explanation of why each of them is misinformed. 1. Flipped instruction, a.k.a. the flipped classroom, is an evolution of the phrase “reverse instruction”, which first appeared in print in 20001. 2. As attested to above, the concept of was formally birthed about a decade and a half ago and has been gaining steam ever since. 3. One of the main things I try to clear up right away when I introduce flipped instruction to teachers is that they have to flip all or most of their content. 4. This just doesn’t make sense. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Jamie’s Flipped: (almost) a year with a flipped classroom There are lots of different ideas about Flipping your classroom, see this TED talk for more. But essentially you provide your learners with resources and videos to allow them to ‘learn’ the material as homework and then build on this with skills in your classroom. Starting in September 2013, and as part of my MSc research, I have implemented my own interpretation of a flipped classroom with really interesting results. Flipped learning? Flipped learning is “…a form of blended learning that encompasses any use of technology to leverage the learning in a classroom, so a teacher can spend more time interacting with students instead of lecturing” where the instructor provides “an opportunity for academics to provide more personal feedback and assistance to students, but also to receive feedback from their students about the activities that they are undertaking and what they don’t yet understand.” The Power of Blogging Jamie’s Flipped… Flipping great! Let me know how you get on

7 Essential Tools for a Flipped Classroom - Getting Smart by Guest Author - classrooms, EdTech, flipped classroom By: Erin Palmer The flipped classroom uses technology to allow students more time to apply knowledge and teachers more time for hands-on education. It’s a continually changing strategy that evolves with technology. Innovative educators are usually on the lookout for the latest technology breakthroughs that will help them better organize and conduct flipped classrooms. The following tools are listed from most basic to most sophisticated and can be used alone or in tandem to make flipped classrooms more engaging. Google Docs Google Docs have many advantages over traditional word processing programs, including real-time automatic updates visible to all users, a feature that enables robust discussion and sharing. YouTube Ideal for first-time flippers, YouTube offers a user-friendly, universally understood platform for taped lectures and other educational videos. Teachem The Flipped Learning Network Camtasia Studio Edmodo or Schoology This guest post was provided by Erin Palmer.

A Radical Approach to Teaching Canadian Students in the Digital Age This fall, Graham Johnson gave up lecturing to his students. YouTube, he figured, could handle that. So he had his math classes at Okanagan Mission Secondary School in Kelowna, B.C., watch prerecorded video lessons from home – freeing up school time for one-on-one work. Turns out pixelated teaching works well: His students’ grades are up about 5 per cent. But that may not be enough. How can we compete with countries like South Korea, which is arming every child with an iPad in a push for a paperless education system by 2015? The problem is that technology doesn’t have a proven payoff. What’s needed isn’t simply technology, but a radical shift in education for the digital age – the courage to address uncomfortable questions. For example, when students can access information online, what’s the value of a teacher at the front of a class? Take Mr. It not only re-imagines how to teach kids – but when they learn and from whom. The flipped classroom isn’t without skeptics. Mr. Mr. Mr.

Video For My Classroom: The Flipped Classroom How to flip the classroom | Flipped Institute Flipping is easy – and with a little thought and planning, teachers can use the flipped model to create engaging learning experiences for their students. This section covers the nuts and bolts of flipping – from creating videos, to introducing the flipped concept, to practical ideas for using class time differently. What are teachers saying? As an English teacher, I have several teaching concepts going at once, so flipping works well for me. I may have kids watch a lesson at home to learn about literary devices in a book we are reading in class. The flipped classroom is about making sure that the "voice" most often heard in the classroom is that of the student, not the teacher.

Flipped Education Video in the Class Keeps Savvy Students Engaged Zara Cruickshank’s Grade 8 science class is a little different from those of yesteryear. Students regularly make mini films or podcasts for class projects, reams of notes are a thing of the past and video is an important part of learning. As the new school year begins a number of Canadian classrooms are increasingly implementing video as an educational tool to keep their digitally savvy students engaged and interested. “It’s just easy to focus when it’s visual,” says Ms. The 13-year-old at Regina’s Ecole Wilfrid Walker is talking specifically about Joanna Sanders Bobiash’s classroom. Ms. “Everyone has different learning styles, they learn best in different ways,” she says. The days of classroom video consisting of a TV and VCR rolled in for a lengthy film students could zone out on are over. “Before they could only express themselves in the written form, but now they can express themselves in different ways,” said the 35-year-old teacher. Ms. Shelly Wright knows what Ms. For Ms.

Top 10 Do’s and Don’ts When Flipping Your Classroom #edchat Produce material for YOUR students to engage them outside the classroom. Generic content works as a starting point but students have greater faith in their own teacher’s input.Decide on a workflow solution and stick to it. I use Edmodo to set assignments and annotate responses. Students are happy with this solution as it is cross platform and supports learning with library and backpack resources.Set specific deadlines for your students. If they are given a date then unfortunately that can be construed as midnight!! The old hand-in mantra of next lesson doesn’t fit the ‘flipped‘ class idea and as such can present a problem.Provide access for students who aren’t connected to the internet at home. Expect students to watch/read your material just because you tell them to. This post is in response to the success we have had with workflow and assessment for learning this academic year. Please contact me if you would like to discuss the ‘flipped’ class as I am very keen to hear any new ideas.

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