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Globe Theater Documentary

Globe Theater Documentary

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVmOric9nUo

Related:  engelskaRomeo and Juliet

London This EFL lesson plan is designed around a short film by Simon Smith who recaptured the shots of London taken by Claude Friese-Greene in 1927. Students talk about what they know about London, compare London in 1927 and now, do a dictation and discuss their home towns. Language level: Intermediate (B1) – Upper Intermediate (B2) Learner type: Teens and adults Shakespeare's Globe Globe Theatre Links | Home (picture credit: Utrecht University Library) The sketch at left is perhaps one of the most important in theatrical history. In 1596, a Dutch student by the name of Johannes de Witt attended a play in London at the Swan Theatre. While there, de Witt made a drawing of the theatre's interior. A friend, Arend van Buchell, copied this drawing—van Buchell's copy is the sketch rendered here—and in doing so contributed greatly to posterity.

Shakespeare Resource Biographical Links | Home Shakespeare's Last Will and Testament For all his fame and celebration, William Shakespeare remains a mysterious figure with regards to personal history. There are just two primary sources for information on the Bard: his works, and various legal and church documents that have survived from Elizabethan times. Naturally, there are many gaps in this body of information, which tells us little about Shakespeare the man. Sanjay Dastoor: A skateboard, with a boost (Teens) “Next time you think about a vehicle, I hope, like us, you’re thinking about something new.” Imagine an electric vehicle that can get you to work — or anywhere in a six-mile radius — quickly, without traffic frustrations or gasoline. Now imagine you can pick it up and carry it with you. Yes, this skateboard could change the face of morning commutes. Do you think that skateboarding is a good form of transport?

Romeo and Juliet Comic [Grammarman Home] [Romeo and Juliet Menu] [Next Page] Jump to page: [1] [2] [3] [4][5] [6] [7] [8] Shakespeare's Globe Theater - Introduction, History, and Images I. History Although Shakespeare's plays were performed at other venues during the playwright's career, the Globe Theatre in the Southwark district of London was the venue at which the Bard's best known stage works (including his four great tragedies) were first produced. The Globe was built during Shakespeare's early period in 1599 by one of his long-standing associates, Cuthbert Burbage, the brother of the most famous Shakespearean actor of the Elizabethan Age, Richard Burbage.

10 More Homophones that will make you laugh The last time I posted an infographic showing 10 funny homophones, it was viewed over 11,000 times in one day alone!!!! The wonderful illustration by Kaplan clearly captured your imagination. So I thought I would share with you 10 more hilarious homophones beautifully illustrated in the infographic below. Homophones are those confusing words in the English language that sound the same but have different meanings and spelling.

Elizabethan Theater - Shakespeare Fun Facts Acting was not a highly paid or highly respected profession. Actors were seen as vagrant troublemakers who promoted hard living and sin. In the 16th century, actors traveled from town to town on a cart, looking for audiences to pay to watch them perform. Playhouses were not constructed in London until 1576. Because acting was not a respected profession, women were not allowed to act until after 1660. Teenage boys who hadn't gone through puberty would play the roles of women, How the English Language is Shakespeare's Language ... Almost all students of English, native and non-native speakers alike, have to study the works of William Shakespeare. Most do so begrudgingly. Part of this reaction is because, despite reassurances from teachers that Shakespeare was one of the most influential writers in the English language (and in the world), many students don’t understand exactly how profound Shakespeare’s influence was on the development of the English language.

Talk about yourself Examiner: Hi. What’s your name? Kelvin: My name is Kelvin. Examiner: Kelvin, OK. So, Kelvin, I’m going to ask you a few questions. I’d like to ask you about your school.

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