background preloader

Sustainable Design - Buildipedia.com™

Sustainable Design - Buildipedia.com™
Upgrade your home’s insulation and air-seal gaps and cracks sooner rather than later. This is one home improvement that will pay for itself relatively quickly and then continue to generate savings for as long as you live in your home. Even if a full upgrade is not in your budget this year, you can tackle several low- or no-cost improvements right now. 1. If you have a sunroom or enclosed porch with a southern exposure, it can collect a great deal of heat. 2. In winter, a surprising amount of cold air can leak into your house around window and door openings, due largely to the fact that the framed (or rough) opening of a window or door is bigger than actual size of the window or door. 3. Baseboard and crown moldings that run along exterior walls are also sources of cold air infiltration. 4. Vent fans, recessed lights, and electric receptacles and switches on exterior walls can be significant sources of uncomfortable drafts and energy loss. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Related:  Resources

Permaculture Principles | Resources | Free Downloads | Permaculture Ethics and Design Principles Poster Permaculture Flower Poster See how permaculture can be applied with this free poster for you to print out. The Permacuture Flower poster is a great teaching tool to present to students, or as a reference. The flower illustrates how the permaculture journey, begining with the ethics and design principles, moves through the key domains required to create a sustainable culture. Examples of specific fields, design systems and solutions are listed to help understand the concept. Suggested size A3 and above, but can be printed at any size without loss of quality. Usage: This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works. Available as a PDF in ENGLISH, DUTCH, SPANISH, PORTUGUESE, HEBREW, FRENCH and HUNGARIAN Permaculture Principle Song Lyrics & Chords Learn the 12 principle songs from the album Permaculture: A Rhymer’s Manual

Institute of Sustainable Building Solar Oval Cob Plan Small Cob Series No permit required - passive solar - small cob buildings SOLAR OVAL ONE is a compact passive solar design with a loft which can be an outbuilding for many possible uses. It has many valuable and green/sustainable features: Building with cob allows the use of local sustainable materials. In many areas the earth at your site can be used and only water, sand and straw will need to be brought to your site to make your cob. The cob is mixed right where you are building and stacked up on an impervious foundation. Floor Plan THE SMALL COB SERIES is a set of small cob structures designed to not require building permits. Solar Oval One is a 120 interior sf. cob design intended to not require a building permit. Section looking North The introduction of irregular, non rectilinear and curved walls into your building creates a link between you, your building and the natural world. The materials needed to make a cob structure are generally very simple and there are many options:

Solar Site Survey Search The Renewable Energy site for Do-It-Yourselfers Path of Sun Across the Sky Note: If you never liked "Science Time", you may want to skip the next few paragraphs, and go right to "Obstacle Survey". The path of the sun across the sky changes with the time of year. At the two equinoxes, the sun rises due east and sets due west. The winter solstice is the shortest day of the year and occurs on Dec 21 in the northern hemisphere. The summer solstice is the longest day of the year and occurs on June 21 in the northern hemisphere. The 23.5 degrees referred to above is the tilt of the earth axis of rotation relative to the plane of the earths orbit. In planning a solar collector location, it is important to make sure that the sun will shine on the collector during all the parts of the year that you want it to. Diagrams showing sunrise/sunset positions for the summer and winter solstices, and the suns altitude at the solstices and equinoxes. Obstacle Survey You will need the following

Bees and Permaculture Article and Film- Brigit Strawbridge We are very proud to have a guest post this week by Brigit Strawbridge on Bees and Permaculture…. First up we have a film of a great talk that Brigit did about bees at the Sunrise Off Grid festival in 2011, followed by a article by Brigit on Bees and Permaculture, a great resource for all bee lovers out there. A quick note, Brigit contacted me to say that at the start of the film she says, there are 200,000 types of bees, but actually it’s 20,000, but it would be great if there was 200,000 Bees and permaculture: I have to admit to being just a little obsessed with bees. They have fascinated and enchanted me since my childhood, but it is only since the decline of the honeybee began to make headlines a few years ago that I fully realised the magnitude of their importance as pollinators – and how much I had always taken them for granted. Pollinators: Brief overview of the bee population: Bees within a permaculture design: Keeping honeybees: Biobees –

Sustainable Building Article Directory This directory links to hundreds of free sustainable building articles on the Internet. In many cases these links point directly to the article, saving time and effort searching through entire websites. Websites with lots of articles are listed under Major Sites. Enjoy! Search these articles: Adobe Adobe Adobe Builder.com Newsletter Archives Adobe and Super Block Technology Some Thoughts on Adobe Codes Agricultural Fibers Agricultural Fibers Agricultural Fibers For Use in Building Components Agricultural Residues: A Promising Alternative to Virgin Wood Fiber Arundo Donax Biobased Structural Composite Materials for Housing and Infrastructure Applications Biocomposites from Engineered Natural Fibers for Housing Panel Applications Fiber Futures Leftover Straw Gets New Life Cellulose Insulation Blown-in Cellulose Insulation Cellulose Facts Cellulose Insulation Winning Market Share in Colorado Earthbag Building With Earthbags Earthbag Earthbag Dome Building The Honey House

Green Roofs Are Changing Architecture: Kowloon Rail Terminus © Aedas It used to be that roofs were up top where nobody could see them, covered in gravel and full of mechanical equipment. Architectural renderings were pretty much all shot from eye level. Not anymore; green roof technology is making roofs into habitable architecture, and changing the way architects think of buildings. The Express Rail Link - West Kowloon Terminus by Aedas will connect Hong Kong to the National High Speed Rail Network. The architects tell Designboom: Flowing ribbon pathways spread to the roof plane, morphing into a highly sculpted garden. atop the 25 to 45 meter tall volume, an observation platform along the south elevation directs views towards the skyline, Victoria Peak and encompassing landscape. The have green walls inside the terminal, too. More images at Aedas and designboom

Housebuilders go back to basics by using traditional methods and materials | The Independent Families unable to afford their own homes are turning their backs on the housing market and winding the clock back, building their own shelters using traditional methods and materials including mud, straw and wood. The trend for designing homes using natural local materials is a reaction to spiralling housing costs, according to the people who train “have-a-go” builders in historic construction techniques. The movement is even influencing major developers, who are investigating ways to use natural products to meet modern building standards. Charlotte Eve, the co-founder of Edwards and Eve Cob Building, says she and her partner have trained thousands of people to build modern, liveable homes using earth dug straight from the ground. In pictures: Traditional construction materials Ms Eve said interest in cob and natural building has grown since the economic downturn of 2008. Cob is a mixture of clay earth, sand and straw, and homes using this material can be built freestyle by hand. Cob Hemp

The Seemingly Simple GO Home is a LEED Platinum House That Packs a Green Energy Punch Photo credit: Trent Bell The bright red GO Home in Belfast, Maine was recently selected as the LEED for Homes Project of the Year for 2011. Completed by GO Logic, the seemingly simple house packs an impressive renewable energy punch and is a LEED Platinum and Passive House certified residence. Because it is a passive house, the home’s owners will see a 90% reduction in their heating bill, resulting in a cool $300 dollars per year for space heating, while enjoying all the comforts of the super insulated building shell during the winter months. + GO Logic Homes

Sustainable Community Living Simple, Modern & Green: Desert Dream House Design Designing and building a home in the high desert is challenging enough thanks to extreme temperature shifts, but all the more so for those who do not want to simply shut themselves off from their surroundings and live in an air-conditioned box – like the engaged clients who hired architect Lloyd Russell to design their sustainable desert residence. A humble rusted metal canopy covers the house itself, providing essential shade to the entire structure as well as all exterior porches and patios. Combined with full-height sliding walls and windows, this plan enables the home to be cooled passively but also lends it a rustic aesthetic shell that blends it with the surrounding landscape and historical desert industrial and farm buildings. The home is populated with all kinds of quirky recycled materials and fixtures, a strange blend of modern and traditional in its look as well as its structure and other physical components.

Traditional building materials and design | ClimateTechWiki Earth-related building materials. In many non-urbanised areas in India, East Africa and South America, raw earth is abundant resource, which has popularly been used as building material. Over times, modern technologies have renovated the use of raw earth materials to improve their performance. For example, raw earth materials are converted into compressed earth blocks, made of a semi-dry mix of clay and sand and produced using a mechanised hydraulically compressed block machine. These blocks are reported to have a load-bearing strength two-thirds that of concrete masonry blocks (Mehta and Bridwell, 2004). A further improvement is achieved by mixing earth with a small percentage of cement during the production process to create compressed stabilised earth blocks. Stabilised rammed earth foundation is an innovative application of earth-related building materials. Innovative implementations of this principle include the installation of water sprayers on the roof, or roofpond systems.

This Amazing Invention Is Saving Countless Lives After Typhoon Haiyan When natural disaster strikes, one of the first and most significant casualties is clean water: Humans can only go so long without liquids; as days pass without functioning infrastructure, bacteria spread and multiply, as does the threat of disease. Large aid organizations’ answer has often been to send 747s stocked with cases of bottled water to the affected areas. But drop-offs like that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars and leave behind a stream of plastic waste. Enter WaterStep, a Kentucky-based aid organization that says it’s come up with a clever solution: the M-100 Chlorine Generator, a football-size water filter that allows survivors to produce up to 10,000 gallons of potable water per day. Sixty of the devices are being used in the Philippines, says WaterStep CEO Mark Hogg. The generator’s byproducts—chlorine and sodium hydroxide—are valuable resources for locals, says Hogg.

AirDrop House: Sustainable Housing Solution For Flood-hit Areas - Green Diary Conceived by architect Andrew Maynard and his team, the AirDrop House is a sustainable housing solution for flood-hit areas. The tiny houses made from dried sponge-like material could be dropped onto the affected areas by standard military aircrafts. The instant floating abodes expand up to a seven meters diameter from original one-meter diameter as soon as it contacts water. It slowly soaks up water and swells into a self-sustaining temporary house. Via: Inhabitat

Related: