background preloader

American Geographical Society Library Digital Map Collection

American Geographical Society Library Digital Map Collection

http://collections.lib.uwm.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/agdm

Related:  Tech and online toolsMaps And Mapping

7 Tools for Adding Questions and Notes to Videos Short videos from YouTube and other sources can be quite helpful in introducing topics to students and or reinforcing concepts that you have taught. Watching the video can be enough for some students, it's better if we can call students' attention to specific sections of videos while they are watching them. The following tools allow you to add comments and questions to videos that you share with your students. Vibby is a service for breaking YouTube videos into segments and inserting comments into those segments.

Inside The Most Amazing Map Library That You've Never Heard Of The American Geographical Society Library at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. (Photo: Luke Spencer.) Within the campus of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee is a geographer’s treasure trove: over a million artifacts from the American Geographical Society, one of the most incredible collections of maps, atlases and globes to be found in America. But, ironically, the library is practically unexplored territory. When I asked for directions on campus many students themselves didn’t know it was there. History Map Archive Browse the Map Archive The art and history of cartography, aka mapmaking, goes back to ancient times. Or at least what they thought it could look like. The Etymology Dictionary informs us that our English word map derives from the Latin word mappa, meaning napkin or cloth on which maps were drawn.

9 Free Tools For Digital Storytelling Stories are important. Whether one tells a story to evoke emotion or to gain a new client, there’s a certain simplicity in it that speaks to a lot of people, as everyone has a story to tell. Now with technology, there’s digital strorytelling too. USGS Historical Topographic Maps Accessing historical topographic maps has never been easier TopoView highlights one of the USGS's most important and useful products, the topographic map. In 1879, the USGS began to map the Nation's topography. This mapping was done at different levels of detail, in order to support various land use and other purposes. As the years passed, the USGS produced new map versions of each area.

Library of Congress - Map Collections The Library of Congress Search by Keyword | Browse by Geographic Location Index | Subject Index | Creator Index | Title Index The Geography and Map Division of the Library of Congress holds more than 4.5 million items, of which Map Collections represents only a small fraction, those that have been converted to digital form. The focus of Map Collections is Americana and Cartographic Treasures of the Library of Congress. These images were created from maps and atlases and, in general, are restricted to items that are not covered by copyright protection. Wagner & Debes Cartographers English: The Leipzig Geographical Institute of Wagner & Debes was important German cartographic printer and publisher of cartographic work in the 19th- and early 20th century. Established in 1835 as a lithographic press by Eduard Wagner, who worked with cartography publisher Karl Baedeker. In 1872 Heinrich Wagner, son of Eduard Wagner, took over, moved the presses to Leipzig, and established his own publishing firm in collaboration with Ernst Debes. Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total.

Anglo-Saxon London Map The full map in overview. A high-resolution version can be found by clicking below. Central London was once largely marshland. The first major Anglo Saxon settlement was Lundenwic (now Covent Garden/Aldwych). 20 maps that never happened Maps are a powerful way of illustrating not only the world that is, but worlds that never have been. What follow are not fictional maps — there's no Westeros or Middle Earth — but plans and hypotheticals that never came to pass. You'll see military plans for invasions that didn't happen or conquests that were hoped-for and never achieved. You'll also find daring infrastructure schemes that would have remapped cities and even whole continents. There are proposals for political reform — some serious and some more fanciful — as well as deeply serious plans for entire independent nation-states that have never been brought to life. Welcome to maps of worlds that don't exist — but might.

Related: