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CSS: Responsive Navigation Menu

CSS: Responsive Navigation Menu
Previously I wrote a tutorial on how to make a mobile navigation for responsive design, now I've discovered a new technique to produce a responsive menu without having to use Javascript. It uses clean and semantic HTML5 markup. The menu can be aligned left, center or right. Unlike the previous tutorial where it is clicked to toggle, this menu toggles on hover which is more user friendly. It also has an indicator to show the active/current menu item. It works on all mobile and desktop browsers including Internet Explorer! View Demo Responsive Menu The Purpose The purpose of this tutorial is to show you how turn a regular list menu into a dropdown menu on smaller display. This trick is more useful on navigation with a lot of links like the screenshot below. Nav HTML Markup Here is the markup for the navigation. The CSS for the navigation (desktop view) is pretty straight forward, so I'm not going to get into the details. Center and Right Alignment Internet Explorer Support Responsive

http://webdesignerwall.com/tutorials/css-responsive-navigation-menu

Related:  TUTORIELSresponsive designresponsive navigation

Creating 3D worlds with HTML and CSS by Keith Clark Last year I created a demo showing how CSS 3D transforms could be used to create 3D environments. The demo was a technical showcase of what could be achieved with CSS at the time but I wanted to see how far I could push things, so over the past few months I’ve been working on a new version with more complex models, realistic lighting, shadows and collision detection. This post documents how I did it and the techniques I used. View the demo(best experienced in Safari) Creating 3D objects

Responsive Column Layouts Typically, to create a column layout, you would need to add the first or last classes to reset the margin space and clear the float. Today I’m going to share a very simple CSS trick to create a responsive column layout using nth-of-type pseudo class. I use this trick to code the WordPress themes at Themify. It doesn’t require any first or last class and the number of columns can be adjusted base on the viewport.

Responsive, Fluid-Width, Variable-Item Navigation with CSS Around six months ago I was asked to develop a single row navigation bar that could contain a variable number of menu items while filling the entire width of the container. The amount of navigational items was dictated elsewhere and likely to change in future. Thinking ahead, it would have been impractical to change the CSS every time a menu item was added or removed.

Responsive Web Design Guidelines and Tutorials In this overview you will find the most useful and popular articles we have published on Smashing Magazine on Responsive Web Design. Design Process In The Responsive Age You cannot plan for and design a responsive, content-focused, mobile-first 1 website the same way you’ve been creating websites for years—you just can’t. How To Create A Responsive Navigation Menu Using Only CSS In this tutorial we will be creating a basic responsive navigation menu with dropdown using only HTML and CSS. Many navigation menus (especially responsive ones) are created using a combination of HTML, CSS and Javascript. This simple CSS only method will demonstrate that Javascript isn't always necessary!

40 CSS jQuery Charts and Graphs Data visualization is the modern equivalent of visual communication and involves the creation and study of the visual representation of data. It transforms information in an abstract, schematic and visual form. Data visualization’s goal is to communicate information clearly and efficiently, and this is done via charts, graphs, plots etc. These use dots, lines, or bars, to visually communicate a message. Learn how to create simple, clean and engaging HTML5 based, CSS jQuery charts. By analyzing, using and following the tutorials and scripts in the list below, you will learn how to create meaningful charts from any data, in a way that provides the appropriate amount of details while still keeping an eye on the big picture and making the information appear in a user-friendly way.

Build a Responsive, Mobile-Friendly Website From Scratch: CSS stylesheet In the last article of this series, I’ve shown how to start building a website from scratch with a particular focus on the HTML code and its main elements. Now it’s time to introduce the first CSS rules in order to have a general idea of the graphic style that the homepage of our website will display, especially for the pc-desktop version. First of all, before having a look on the rules we have to apply in order to create a particular design for our homepage, let’s see how it will appear in our browser window (my default browser is Chrome but, with the application of some specific rules, you’ll be able to obtain the same result for all modern web-browsers). The homepage of our totally customizable website should look more or less as following:

Should You Use Inline-Blocks As A Substitute For Floats? When it comes to developing a site layout with css, floats do most of the heavy lifting. We use them for the big blocks like our main content and sidebar and we use them for the smaller blocks inside these big ones. Are floats always the answer? They generally work well, but sometimes they can be hard to work with. Windows mobile media queries When I met up with Malarkey right before An Event Apart in Seattle he told me about a quick bit of guerrilla testing he had been doing. He popped into a store selling Windows Phone 7 devices and started surfing the web. Specifically, he started looking at sites using responsive design like Jon’s and Colly’s. Most of the sites he looked at displayed the desktop layout instead of adapting to the smaller dimensions of the screen. That’s because the rendering engine for Windows Phone 7—some bastard hybrid of IE7 and IE6—doesn’t support media queries.

A Flexible Approach to Responsive Navigation Many responsive websites provide a horizontal navigation bar on large screens and drop-down navigation for smaller viewports. It's a perfectly decent approach, but it's not without its issues. Firstly, devices don't just come in large and small; they come in every size imaginable.

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