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6 Expert Tips for Flipping the Classroom

6 Expert Tips for Flipping the Classroom
Tech-Enabled Learning | Feature 6 Expert Tips for Flipping the Classroom Three leaders in flipped classroom instruction share their best practices for creating a classroom experience guaranteed to inspire lifelong learning. By Jennifer Demski01/23/13 "If you were to step into one of my classrooms, you'd think I was teaching a kindergarten class, not a physics class," laughs Harvard University (MA) professor Eric Mazur. "Not because the students are children, but because of the chaos and how oblivious the students are to my presence." Such pandemonium is a good thing, insists Mazur, an early adopter of the flipped classroom model that has become all the rage at colleges and universities across the country. In a flipped classroom, professors assign pre-class homework consisting of brief, recorded lectures and presentations, digital readings with collaborative annotation capabilities, and discussion board participation. 2) Be up front with your expectations.

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Mark Frydenberg: The Flipped Classroom: It's Got to Be Done Right As screen-savvy, digital-native Millenials reach college, a dynamic new teaching method is rising across America: the flipped classroom. The premise of a flipped classroom is simple: Instead of lecturing in class and giving homework at home, flip it: give the lectures at home, and do the homework in class. Lectures have been recorded for years, of course. But in 2007, high school teachers Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams pioneered a new movement when they recorded their PowerPoint presentations for students who missed class to watch on their portable music players. With help from the Internet, word grew of the flipped classroom. Teachers tried it.

The Flipped Classroom Guide for Teachers As technology becomes increasingly common in instruction at all levels of education from kindergarten to college, the modern classroom is changing. The traditional teacher-centered classroom is falling away to give students a student-centered classroom where collaborative learning is stressed. One way educators are effectively utilizing online learning and changing the way they teach is by flipping their classrooms. What is a Flipped Classroom? High school teachers Aaron Sanns and Jonathan Bergman were the first to flip their classrooms. The Flip started when these teachers began supplying absent students with an online lecture they could watch from home or from wherever they had access to a computer and the Internet, including school or the local library.

The flipped classroom: What to do and not to do The original concept of flipped classroom found teachers turning their lectures into online videos for viewing outside of class. (Shutterstock photo) Teachers all over the country are flipping out over a new progressive education model: The flipped classroom. In a nutshell, the idea of the flipped classroom is based around the question: What’s the best use of class time? The original concept found teachers turning their lectures into online videos for viewing outside of class, while classroom time was dedicated to homework. The reasoning was students traditionally do homework outside of the class but if they have trouble with it they may either not do it or even copy off a classmate.

8 Great Videos About the Flipped Classroom Following is a selection of eight videos that discuss the flipped classroom and why it makes so much sense. Learn how the flip enables teachers to truly personalize the classroom and differentiate learning. Discover how flipping the classroom can go hand in hand with mastery learning. Take a deeper dive into flipped instruction and questions that many teachers raise when they first learn about it, in a flipped class panel discussion. Pros and Cons of The Flipped Classroom The flipped classroom has been gathering steam for a few years now. The premise: watch videos of instruction or lecture at home, and do the “homework” with the teacher in class. The Flipped Class: What it is and What it is Not In reality, there isn’t a whole lot of philosophical or theoretical information that I believe I can personally share that will be cutting edge, or not met with a new debate. I’ll let you access the flood of stories on Khan Academy if you wish to engage in that conversation. The Flipped Class: What Does a Good One Look Like?

Three Great iPad Apps for Recording Tutorials and Screen Sharing February 21, 2014 iPad is a great versatile device that can be utilized for a wide range of educational purposes in our classrooms. One of the best uses is to turn it into a whiteboard canvass to record and create tutorials and step by step guides to share with your students. The Flipped Class as a Way TO the Answers One common criticism of the the Flipped Class is that it really isn’t that big of a change. A recorded lecture is still just a lecture. Instead of students sitting in a room and hearing a “boring” lecture we bore them at home. There really isn’t anything revolutionary about a video lecture.

Do Video Lessons Reinforce Learning, or Simply Reinforce Incorrect Information? Have you ever shown a video to a classroom of students and heard one or more of them say, “I already know this stuff”? While the video plays, these students are likely to daydream, surf their phones, doodle, or otherwise fail to pay attention and learn. Worse yet, if they have a certain perception of how something works and this is corrected in the video, not only are they not too likely to pick up on it, but they may actually come away from the experience thinking their perception was validated. The same thing can happen when they watch videos on their own as part of assigned work outside of class.

Five Best Practices for the Flipped Classroom Ok, I'll be honest. I get very nervous when I hear education reformists and politicians tout how "incredible" the flipped-classroom model, or how it will "solve" many of the problems of education. It doesn't solve anything. It is a great first step in reframing the role of the teacher in the classroom. It fosters the "guide on the side" mentality and role, rather than that of the "sage of the stage." My Flipped Classroom – I Will Never Teach Another Way Again I saw Tom Mennella present on his flipped Genetics course at NERCOMP14 in March and was impressed with the clearly defined structure of his approach. I asked him to consider writing it up for EmergingEdTech, and I’m delighted that he did! Here’s Tom’s thorough overview of how he has successfully flipped BIO210 at Bay Path University. – K. Walsh In March of 2014, the Flipped Learning Network (www.flippedlearning.org) adopted and released a formal definition for flipped learning: “Flipped Learning is a pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space, and the resulting group space is transformed into a dynamic, interactive learning environment where the educator guides students as they apply concepts and engage creatively in the subject matter.”

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