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Jean-Luc Godard

Jean-Luc Godard
Jean-Luc Godard (French: [ʒɑ̃lyk ɡɔdaʁ]; born 3 December 1930) is a French-Swiss film director, screenwriter and film critic. He is often identified with the 1960s French film movement La Nouvelle Vague, or "New Wave". Like his New Wave contemporaries, Godard criticized mainstream French cinema's "Tradition of Quality", which "emphasized craft over innovation, privileged established directors over new directors, and preferred the great works of the past to experimentation." To challenge this tradition, he and like-minded critics started to make their own films. Many of Godard's films challenge the conventions of traditional Hollywood in addition to French cinema.[3] He is often considered the most radical French filmmaker of the 1960s and 1970s. Several of his films expressed his political views. Early life[edit] Early career (1950–59)[edit] Film criticism[edit] In Paris, in the Latin Quarter just prior to 1950, ciné-clubs (film societies) were gaining prominence. Filmmaking[edit]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Luc_Godard

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Generation War When the series first aired in Germany, each episode garnered around 7 million viewers. The Economist stated that hardly any German TV drama ever caused that much public debate.[1] Generation War has generated much controversy. The film's portrayal of Nazis as "Others" separate from and different from most Germans provoked disbelief, and was criticized as historically inaccurate. Some critics have commended the series as well-crafted, and praised it for showing aspects of the war not shown in other World War II pictures. Other critics were outraged by alleged characteristics of the story, including the portrayal of the Polish anti-Nazi resistance as fanatical anti-semites, the trivialization of the persecution of Jews by Nazi Germany, the hiding of the German role in the Holocaust,[2] and the whitewashing of the difference between non-German victims and German perpetrators.[3][4][5]

Wim Wenders Alongside filmmaking, Wenders works with the medium of photography, emphasizing images of desolate landscapes.[1][2] Early life[edit] Wenders was born in Düsseldorf into a traditional Catholic family. Michael Haneke In 2013 Haneke won the Prince of Asturias Award for the arts. Life and career[edit] Haneke was born in Munich, Germany, the son of the German actor and director Fritz Haneke and the Austrian actress Beatrix von Degenschild. His stepfather, the composer Alexander Steinbrecher (de), had later married the mother of actor Christoph Waltz.[6] Haneke was raised in the city of Wiener Neustadt, Austria, and later attended the University of Vienna to study philosophy, psychology and drama after failing to achieve success in his early attempts in acting and music.

Quentin Tarantino Early life[edit] Tarantino was born in Knoxville, Tennessee in 1963.[6] He is the son of actor and amateur musician Tony Tarantino and nurse Connie McHugh.[7][8] He has a younger half-brother named Ron. Tarantino grew bored with the James Best Acting School and left after two years, although he kept in touch with all of his acting friends. He then landed a job which threatened to interfere with his long-term acting ambitions.[17] As an employee of Video Archives, a now-defunct video rental store in Manhattan Beach, he and fellow movie enthusiasts (including Roger Avary) discussed cinema and customer video recommendations at length. He paid close attention to the types of films people liked to rent and has cited that experience as inspiration for his directorial career.[18] Tarantino has been quoted as saying: "When people ask me if I went to film school I tell them 'no, I went to films.

Werner Herzog Werner Herzog Stipetić (German: [ˈʋɛɐ̯nɐ ˈhɛɐ̯tsoːk ˈstɪpɛtɪt͡ʃ]; born 5 September 1942), known as Werner Herzog, is a German film director, producer, screenwriter, author, actor and opera director. Herzog is considered one of the greatest figures of the New German Cinema, along with Rainer Werner Fassbinder, Margarethe von Trotta, Volker Schlöndorff, Werner Schröter, and Wim Wenders. Herzog's films often feature heroes with impossible dreams,[1] people with unique talents in obscure fields, or individuals who are in conflict with nature.[2] French filmmaker François Truffaut once called Herzog "the most important film director alive."[3] American film critic Roger Ebert said that Herzog "has never created a single film that is compromised, shameful, made for pragmatic reasons or uninteresting. Even his failures are spectacular

Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 Tips on How to Write a Great Story By Maria Popova The year of reading more and writing better is well underway with writing advice the likes of David Ogilvy’s 10 no-bullshit tips, Henry Miller’s 11 commandments, Jack Kerouac’s 30 beliefs and techniques, John Steinbeck’s 6 pointers, and various invaluable insight from other great writers. Now comes Kurt Vonnegut (November 11, 1922–April 11, 2007) — anarchist, Second Life dweller, imaginary interviewer of the dead, sad soul — with eight tips on how to write a good short story, narrated by the author himself.

Ann Hui Ann Hui On-Wah, MBE (traditional Chinese: 許鞍華; simplified Chinese: 许鞍华; pinyin: Xǔ Ānhuá; Hepburn: Kyo Anka; born 23 May 1947 to a Chinese father and a Japanese mother[1][2]) is a Hong Kong actress, film director, film producer and occasional screenwriter, one of the most critically acclaimed amongst the Hong Kong New Wave. She is best known for her controversial films surrounding the topics of social issues in Hong Kong. Early Life and education[edit] On 23 May 1947, Ann Hui was born in Anshan, Liaoning province, Manchuria to a Chinese father and a Japanese mother. In 1952, she moved to Macau, then Hong Kong at the age of five and attended St.

30 Amazing Stanley Kubrick Cinemagraphs Stanley Kubrick was devoted to images, telling his stories as visually as possible. His images have an arresting power that few if any other directors can match. Dublin-based film critic Paul Lynch may have summed it up best speaking on A Clockwork Orange: With colour, Kubrick found an alacrity and an arrest in his images that began to transcend the subject material of his stories…Those widescreen shots seem to push the natural boundaries of the screen, to absorb every photon of light. ESSENTIAL IRANIAN FILMS - Listes The White Balloon (Panahi) Jafar Panahi’s charming film starring Aida Mohammadkhani as a small girl with her heart set on a beautiful goldfish who has to overcome a series of obstacles and misadventures in a quite suspenseful race against time before the shop shuts for New Year. ~~

The Hunger Games, explained The beginning of the end of the Hunger Games movie franchise arrives today. Mockingjay Part-1, the first installment in the series' two-part finale, hurtles into theaters like one of Katniss Everdeen's arrows. It's been six years since readers — and then viewers — were first introduced to the "Girl on Fire," and in that time, Katniss and the franchise have become household names. But maybe you're just getting into The Hunger Games.

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