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Olia lialina cv

Olia lialina cv
On the 22nd of April 2013 Olia Lialinabacked her first ever cake, for somebody very special. Still fun to be a GIF But when retired I want to be a JPEG Tiled In the background of your profile Olia Lialina is a frequent Internet Cafe visitor bio: Born in Moscow. Net Artist, one of net.art pioneers. Writes on New Media, Digital Folklore and Vernacular Web.

http://art.teleportacia.org/olia.html

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Olia Lialina Olia Lialina (born in Moscow) is a pioneer Internet artist and theorist as well as an experimental film and video critic and curator. Lialina studied film criticism and journalism at Moscow State University, then followed with art residencies at C3 (Budapest,) and Villa Walderta (Munich,).[1] She founded Art Teleportacia, a web gallery of her work, which also features links to remakes of her most famous work "My boyfriend came back from the war" [2] and was one of the organizers and later, director of Cine Fantom, an experimental cinema club in Moscow co-founded in 1995 by Lialina with Gleb Aleinikov, Andrej Silvestrov, Boris Ukhananov, Inna Kolosova and others. Aram Bartholl - datenform.de Map at 'Hello World!' Kasseler Kunstverein, Fridericianum 2013 'Map' at Rencontre Arles 'From Here On' pics by Anne Foures, 2011

What Killed The Infographic? A few years ago, the Internet was awash in groundbreaking data visualizations. There was Aaron Koblin's deeply influential map of flight patterns around the U.S. Periscopic's exhaustive, haunting portrait of gun violence in the United States. Jer Thorp and John Underkoffler's Minority Report-like interface for exploring the galaxy. The Opte Project Here you will find static and dynamic 2D JPG/PNG images and 3D VRML maps of the Internet. These maps are built off of our database using two different graphing engines: Large Graph Layout (LGL) by Alex Adai and Graphviz by Peter North at AT&T Labs Research. Each graphing engine produces wonderful displays, but they are only as good as the data and graphing language we provide. You can find our test images and some well produced full Internet maps below. Soon we will release the tools to create these maps on your own.

Olia Lialina, 'Summer' (2013) Summer (2013). Olia Lialina. Screenshot of animation comprising individual GIF images displayed across multiple websites. Gallery · mbostock/d3 Wiki Wiki ▸ Gallery Welcome to the D3 gallery! More examples are available on bl.ocks.org/mbostock.

Jon Ippolito Welcome to Jon Ippolito's home page. Browse topics at upper left or choose themes from the cloud above. Built with Sometimes a GIF Is All You Need Today and yesterday were glorious days in New York: August had come, the sun was shining, the weather was just right. They were the type of days that make you want to frolic, or skip or swing. And so it happened, when I clicked on a link in a tweet by pioneering net artist and critic Olia Lialina, that I saw her swinging joyfully towards me in my browser. This, I thought, is the perfect expression of summer. Lialina’s piece “Summer” is a GIF, and at first glance, a fairly simple one: it features an image of the artist swinging to and fro against a blank background that bleeds from bright blue to white. She wears a summery outfit, with her loose hair puffing out as she moves and a slight smile on her face.

Everything Science Knows About Reading On Screens Thanks to technology, we’re reading more than ever—our brains process thousands of words via text messages, email, games, social media, and web stories. According to one report, the amount people that read tripled from 1980 to the late 2000s, and it’s probably safe to say that trend continues today. But as we jam more and more words into our heads, how we read those words has changed in a fundamental way: we’ve moved from paper to screens. It’s left many wondering what we’ve lost (or gained) in the shift, and a handful of scientists are trying to figure out the answer.

WYSOCKA, E. Agatha Re-Appears, net art resoration project, 2008 Restoration Project: Olia Lialina’s early net.art piece “Agatha Appears” from the Collection of C³ Center for Culture & Communication Foundation Author: Olia Lialina (C3 Residency Program); Márton Fernezelyi (Programmer) Title: Agatha Appears Created: 1997 Type: Interactive resource, net based art

Foundation Mediamatic Foundation is a cultural institution. We are interested in cultural developments that go hand in hand with new technologies, and in new technologies that cause cultural development. We organize exhibitions, salons, lectures, workshops and screenings. We develop software and art projects, and are an on-again, off-again publishing house. Mediamatic Lab our affiliate organization has stopped developing web sites. This service has been moved to Driebit.nl. UFC Fighter Ronda Rousey Has Physics-Based Superpowers On August 1, Ronda Rousey defeated Bethe Corriea in a UFC bantamweight match in a scathing, fleeting 34 seconds. But how awesome is Rousey, really? Was 34 Seconds Too Short? If you watched the Rousey-Corriea fight on pay per view, then you might think 34 seconds was too short.

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