background preloader

Tropical Storm Risk (TSR) for long-range forecasts of hurricane, typhoon and cyclone worldwide

Tropical Storm Risk (TSR) for long-range forecasts of hurricane, typhoon and cyclone worldwide

http://www.tropicalstormrisk.com/

Related:  Country and Geopolitical RiskHurricane

Business Cycle Indicators Global Business Cycle Indicators The Conference Board publishes leading, coincident, and lagging indexes designed to signal peaks and troughs in the business cycle for major economies around the world. Click here for timely insights on the business cycle from our economists. Leading Economic Indicators Purchase Options *Prices are subject to change annually Hurricanes - FSU COAPS On May 30, 2013, COAPS scientists released their fifth annual Atlantic hurricane season forecast. Hurricane season begins June 1 and runs through Nov. 30. The 2013 forecast called for a 70 percent probability of 12 to 17 named storms, including 5 to 10 hurricanes. The mean forecast was for 15 named storms, including 8 hurricanes, and an average accumulated cyclone energy (a measure of the strength and duration of storms accumulated during the season) of 135. The forecast numbers were based on 50 individual seasonal atmospheric forecasts using sea surface temperatures predicted by a recently upgraded National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)climate model. The forecast mean numbers are identical to the observed 1995-2010 average named storms and hurricanes and reflect the ongoing period of heightened tropical activity in the North Atlantic.

Human Development Index (HDI) The HDI was created to emphasize that people and their capabilities should be the ultimate criteria for assessing the development of a country, not economic growth alone. The HDI can also be used to question national policy choices, asking how two countries with the same level of GNI per capita can end up with different human development outcomes. These contrasts can stimulate debate about government policy priorities. The Human Development Index (HDI) is a summary measure of average achievement in key dimensions of human development: a long and healthy life, being knowledgeable and have a decent standard of living.

Hurricanes - FSU COAPS On May 30, 2013, COAPS scientists released their fifth annual Atlantic hurricane season forecast. Hurricane season begins June 1 and runs through Nov. 30. The 2013 forecast called for a 70 percent probability of 12 to 17 named storms, including 5 to 10 hurricanes. The mean forecast was for 15 named storms, including 8 hurricanes, and an average accumulated cyclone energy (a measure of the strength and duration of storms accumulated during the season) of 135. The forecast numbers were based on 50 individual seasonal atmospheric forecasts using sea surface temperatures predicted by a recently upgraded National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)climate model. The forecast mean numbers are identical to the observed 1995-2010 average named storms and hurricanes and reflect the ongoing period of heightened tropical activity in the North Atlantic.

Energy Trilemma Index The Energy Sustainability Index ranks countries in terms of their likely ability to provide sustainable energy policies through the 3 dimensions of the energy trilemma: Energy security: the effective management of primary energy supply from domestic and external sources, the reliability of energy infrastructure, and the ability of participating energy companies to meet current and future demand.Energy equity: the accessibility and affordability of energy supply across the population.Environmental sustainability: the achievement of supply and demand-side energy efficiencies and the development of energy supply from renewable and other low-carbon sources. The Index rank measures overall performance and the balance score highlights how well a country manages the trade-offs between the three competing dimensions: energy security, energy equity, and environmental sustainability. The best score ‘A’ is given for a very high performance. Download CSV Download chart

Global Tropical Hazards Assessment Recent observations of tropical convective anomalies have been more consistent with MJO activity. Both the RMM-based MJO index and the CPC velocity potential MJO index indicate an eastward propagating signal, with enhanced convection over the eastern Indian Ocean and western Maritime Continent. The spatial pattern of velocity potential anomalies is also increasingly suggestive of a coherent MJO, with a Wave-1 pattern supporting large scale upper-level divergence (convergence) over the eastern Indian Ocean, Maritime Continent, and West Pacific (Western Hemisphere and western Indian Ocean).

CIPS Risk Index - The Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply How do the colours on the Country Heatmap correspond to the Country Reports? The colour coding relates to D&B country scores which are divided into seven bands ranging from DB1 (lowest risk) to DB7 (highest risk). Each band is subdivided into quartiles (a-d) with an ‘a’ designation representing slightly less risk than a ‘b’ and so on. Tropical cyclone ‘maximum intensity’ is shifting toward the poles Over the past 30 years, the location where tropical cyclones reach maximum intensity has been shifting toward the poles in both the northern and southern hemispheres at a rate of about 35 miles, or one-half a degree of latitude, per decade according to a new study, The Poleward Migration of the Location of Tropical Cyclone Maximum Intensity, published tomorrow in Nature. As tropical cyclones move into higher latitudes, some regions closer to the equator may experience reduced risk, while coastal populations and infrastructure poleward of the tropics may experience increased risk. With their devastating winds and flooding, tropical cyclones can especially endanger coastal cities not adequately prepared for them. Additionally, regions in the tropics that depend on cyclones’ rainfall to help replenish water resources may be at risk for lower water availability as the storms migrate away from them. The amount of poleward migration varies by region.

Export credits Last Updated: 21 August 2014 The country risk classifications of the Participants to the Arrangement on Officially Supported Export Credits (the "Arrangement") are one of the most fundamental building blocks of the Arrangement rules on minimum premium rates for credit risk. They are produced solely for the purpose of setting minimum premium rates for transactions supported according to the Arrangement and they are made public so that any country that is not an OECD Member or a Participant to the Arrangement may observe the rules of the Arrangement if they so choose. Neither the Participants to the Arrangement or the OECD Secretariat endorse nor encourage their use for any other purpose. The country risk classifications are meant to reflect country risk. The country risk classifications are not sovereign risk classifications and should not, therefore, be compared with the sovereign risk classifications of private credit rating agencies (CRAs).

That Hurricane Guy's Storm Composite NOAA Doppler Radar Weather Channel Oceanweather Inc. NOAA Geostationary Satellite NOAA Tropical Analysis and Forecast Branch

Related: