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Noam Chomsky on Where Artificial Intelligence Went Wrong - Yarden Katz

Noam Chomsky on Where Artificial Intelligence Went Wrong - Yarden Katz
An extended conversation with the legendary linguist Graham Gordon Ramsay If one were to rank a list of civilization's greatest and most elusive intellectual challenges, the problem of "decoding" ourselves -- understanding the inner workings of our minds and our brains, and how the architecture of these elements is encoded in our genome -- would surely be at the top. Yet the diverse fields that took on this challenge, from philosophy and psychology to computer science and neuroscience, have been fraught with disagreement about the right approach. In 1956, the computer scientist John McCarthy coined the term "Artificial Intelligence" (AI) to describe the study of intelligence by implementing its essential features on a computer. Instantiating an intelligent system using man-made hardware, rather than our own "biological hardware" of cells and tissues, would show ultimate understanding, and have obvious practical applications in the creation of intelligent devices or even robots. Yarden Katz

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/11/noam-chomsky-on-where-artificial-intelligence-went-wrong/261637/

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Interview with Nick Hornby (Author of High Fidelity) February, 2015 English author and screenwriter Nick Hornby, perhaps best known for his autobiography Fever Pitch and his novels High Fidelity and About a Boy, returns to bookstores this month with Funny Girl, his first novel in over five years. Set in London in the mid-1960s, featuring a female protagonist who rejects a beauty queen title to instead pursue a career as a comedic television actor, Hornby's newest book captures a brief window of time in 20th century popular culture when over half of the U.K. would watch a hit TV show and the Beatles and Rolling Stones had yet to fully assert their dominance. With his usual humor, pop culture references, and enviable empathy, Hornby has created another cast of instantly memorable characters. Just before departing on his book tour, Hornby spoke with Goodreads Author J. Error rating book.

The Myth Of AI That mythology, in turn, has spurred a reactionary, perpetual spasm from people who are horrified by what they hear. You'll have a figure say, "The computers will take over the Earth, but that's a good thing, because people had their chance and now we should give it to the machines." Then you'll have other people say, "Oh, that's horrible, we must stop these computers." Most recently, some of the most beloved and respected figures in the tech and science world, including Stephen Hawking and Elon Musk, have taken that position of: "Oh my God, these things are an existential threat.

The Next Big Thing in Email is You On Monday mornings, my personal inbox is a hailstorm. 25%-off sales, blog posts from every industry site I subscribed to, spam from 3 sites I once used to look at house paint, and 400 emails from J. Crew (I exaggerate, but it’s a lot). I’m sure you can relate. And beneath all of those layers, there are 10 emails I want to read: 2 blog posts, a message from my aunt, a bunch of imgur links from friends, and 3 solid gold personal email newsletters. Category:Artificial intelligence From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Subcategories This category has the following 32 subcategories, out of 32 total. Pages in category "Artificial intelligence" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 256 total.

AI designs its own video game - tech - 07 March 2012 Video games designed almost entirely by a computer program herald a new wave of AI creativity Read more: "Better living through video gaming" Have a go at the game designed especially for New Scientist by the AI Angelina: "Space Station Invaders" IT IS never going to compete with the latest iteration of Call of Duty, but then Space Station Invaders is not your typical blockbuster video game. Like a Swarm of Lethal Bugs: The Most Terrifying Drone Video Yet - Conor Friedersdorf An Air Force simulation says researchers are at work on killer robots so tiny that a group of them could blend into a cityscape. Science writer John Horgan's feature on the many ways drones will be used in coming years is interesting throughout, and terrifying in the passage where he describes an effort to build micro-drones that are, as the U.S. Air Force describes them, "Unobtrusive, pervasive, and lethal." Air Force officials declined a request to observe flight tests at a "micro-aviary" they've built, he reported, but they did let him see a video dramatization "starring micro-UAVs that resemble winged, multi-legged bugs.

What are Social Skills? Social skills are the skills we use to communicate and interact with each other, both verbally and non-verbally, through gestures, body language and our personal appearance. Human beings are sociable creatures and we have developed many ways to communicate our messages, thoughts and feelings with others. What is said is influenced by both verbal language and the way we use it - tone of voice, volume of speech and the words we choose - as well as by more subtle messages such as body language, gestures and other non-verbal communication methods. The fact that some people are better 'social interactors' than others has led to detailed investigations into the nature and function of interpersonal interaction. Developing social skills is about being aware of how we communicate with others, the messages we send and how methods of communication can be improved to make the way we communicate more efficient and effective.

Artificial General Intelligence in Second Life  Virtual worlds are the golden path to achieving Artificial General Intelligence and positive Singularity, Dr Ben Goertzel’s, CEO of Novamente LLC and author of “The Hidden Pattern: A Patternist Philosophy of Mind” explained in his presentation “Artificial General Intelligence in Virtual Worlds” given at the Singularity Summit 2007 earlier this month. According to Goertzel, Singularity is no longer a far future idea. About a year ago Goertzel gave a talk “Ten Years to a Positive Singularity — If We Really, Really Try.” Humanoid Robot Learns Language Like a Baby With the help of human instructors, a robot has learned to talk like a human infant, learning the names of simple shapes and colors. “Our work focuses on early stages analogous to some characteristics of a human child of about 6 to 14 months, the transition from babbling to first word forms,” wrote computer scientists led by Caroline Lyon of the University of Hertfordshire in a June 13 Public Library of Science One study. Named DeeChee, the robot is an iCub, a three-foot-tall open source humanoid machine designed to resemble a baby.

Chapter 3: Neotechnological conditioning Chapter 3 Neotechnological Conditioning – Jean-Marc Mandosio “Reaction against machine-culture. The machine, itself a product of the highest intellectual energies, sets in motion in those who serve it almost nothing but the lower, non-intellectual energies. Patenting Life - MichaelCrichton.com Human beings share mostly the same genes. The same genes are found in other animals as well. Our genetic makeup represents the common heritage of all life on earth. Artificial Intelligence After decades of start-and-stop, artificial intelligence is being advanced by major computing firms from Facebook and Google to IBM. In the left-... The James Martin 21st Century School at the University of Oxford in Oxford, England, founded in 2005, is more commonly known as the Oxford Martin... Social networks are capturing a phenomenal amount of data on their users. But the vast majority of that information is unstructured and can't easily...

One Per Cent: Bot with boyish personality wins biggest Turing test Celeste Biever, deputy news editor Eugene Goostman, a chatbot with the personality of a 13-year-old boy, won the biggest Turing test ever staged, on 23 June, the 100th anniversary of the birth of Alan Turing. Held at Bletchley Park near Milton Keynes, UK, where Turing cracked the Nazi Enigma code during the second world war, the test involved over 150 separate conversations, 30 judges (including myself), 25 hidden humans and five elite, chattering software programs. By contrast, the most famous Turing test - the annual Loebner prize, also held at Bletchley Park this year to honour Turing - typically involves just four human judges and four machines. "With 150 Turing tests conducted, this is the biggest Turing test contest ever," says Huma Shah, a researcher at the University of Reading, UK, who organised the mammoth test. That makes the result more statistically significant than any other previous Turing test, says Eugene's creator Vladimir Veselov based in Raritan, New Jersey.

How to Understand Everything (and why) — Metamodern Too much to know, lots to know about In science and technology, there is a broad and integrative kind of knowledge that can be learned, but isn’t taught. It’s important, though, because it makes creative work more productive and makes costly blunders less likely.

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