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Five simple steps to better typographyMark Boulton

Five simple steps to better typographyMark Boulton
– April 13th, 2005 – Typography, I find, is still a bit of mystery to a lot of designers. The kind of typography I’m talking about is not your typical “What font should I use” typography but rather your “knowing your hanging punctuation from your em-dash” typography. Call me a little bit purist but this bothers me. So, in an attempt to spread the word here’s the first of five simple steps to better typography. To kick it off, part one is about the Measure. Measure the Measure. The Measure is the name given to the width of a body of type. One point = 1/72 of an inchOne pica = 12 pointsOne em = The distance horizontally equal to the type size, in points, you are using. But, with the advent of DTP packages and the website design the following are also now used: MillimetresPixels There is an optimum width for a Measure and that is defined by the amount of characters are in the line. CSS and fluid? What is interesting here is fluid designs on the web. The Measure and leading. Reversing out? Tracking

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Five simple steps to better typography – Part 3Mark Boulton – April 25th, 2005 – I’m pleased this series is turning out to be so popular and it’s somewhat confirmed what I suspected. A bit of a thirst for simple typographic design theory. As I’ve been writing this series i’ve deluged by email and comments from people agreeing, disagreeing, asking for more information etc. What’s great is designers are thinking and talking about typography again. Download the 75 best free fonts This list represents the 100 best free fonts we've found in a variety of styles. We have many other articles covering specialist font types including handwriting fonts, graffiti fonts, web fonts and more, but we have sectioned our main list under these styles: Most of the typeface collections listed here can be used in your projects, but please be sure to check the terms. Now join us as we present you with 100 of the best free fonts, which you can download and use today. Body fonts 01.

A List Apart: Topics: Design: Typography Visual communication, art direction. Web layouts and typography. Graphic design, interface design, user experience design, illustration, photography, artwork. Creative, strategic, and technical approaches to crafting great interfaces. Visual styles, influences, and trends. Edward Tufte’s “Slopegraphs” After you read this post, you’ll probably want to check out the follow-up, A Slopegraph Update. Back in 2004, Edward Tufte defined and developed the concept of a “sparkline”. Odds are good that — if you’re reading this — you’re familiar with them and how popular they’ve become. A history and some revival fonts < The Fell Types The Fell Types took their name from John Fell, a Bishop of Oxford in the seventeenth-century. Not only he created an unique collection of printing types but he started one of the most important adventures in the history of typography. You will find here a non-exhaustive history and a modern digitization of some of them.

Fonts - Type topics: Glossary This section provides a small glossary of terms frequently used in the type world. alignment The positioning of text within the page margins. Alignment can be flush left, flush right, justified, or centered. Flush left and flush right are sometimes referred to as left justified and right justified. - 1229x994 [1215x835] Sometimes the toughest step in building a new website or redesign can be the conceptual ones. Selecting a color palette is one of them that can be tough if you don’t have the right tools. So where do you start? It all comes down to basic color theory and the color wheel. That same tool that teachers used in school really is the basis for how designers plan and use color in almost every project from the simplest web page to expansive brands with multiple sites and campaigns. Basic Color Theory

The Big Book of Font Combinations What is this book not? It is not intended as a showcase of typography. It is a tool. A workbook. Vox-ATypI classification In typography, the Vox-ATypI classification makes it possible to classify typefaces in eleven general classes. Devised by Maximilien Vox in 1954, it was adopted in 1962 by the Association Typographique Internationale (ATypI) and in 1967 as a British Standard, as British Standards Classification of Typefaces (BS 2961:1967), which is a very basic interpretation of the earlier Vox-ATypI classification. Originally a ten-part classification, Vox revised his original proposal within months to a more compact nine-part scheme. Periodic Table of Typefaces on the Behance Network Large original English version HERESpanish version HEREPortuguese version HERE PRINTS, SOURCE FILES, and other Periodic Table of Typeface related goodies are available HERE The Periodic Table of Typefaces is obviously in the style of all the thousands of over-sized Periodic Table of Elements posters hanging in schools and homes around the world. This particular table lists 100 of the most popular, influential and notorious typefaces today. As with traditional periodic tables, this table presents the subject matter grouped categorically.

Five simple steps to better typography ? Part 5Mark Boulton – May 18th, 2005 – The final part in this series, I’m glad to say is a little more cut and dry than the last in the series. It’s more about historical typographic theory but with a simple, practical guide to ensuring a balanced use of typeface weights. Typeface weight, and the choice of weight, is perhaps one area of typography that to most designers is simply a matter of choice. That choice is dictated by answering a design problem which is aesthetically, or content, motivated. What many designers do not realise is that there are rules which should govern the choice of weight - a typographic pecking order - which when followed, aids the designer’s typesetting and can produce stunning results.

The Future Of CSS Typography Advertisement There has been an increasing and sincere interest in typography on the web over the last few years. Most websites rely on text to convey their messages, so it’s not a surprise that text is treated with utmost care. In this article, we’ll look at some useful techniques and clever effects that use the power of style sheets and some features of the upcoming CSS Text Level 3 specification, which should give Web designers finer control over text. Keep in mind that these new properties and techniques are either new or still in the works, and some of the most popular browsers do not yet support them.

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