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Discovering American Women's History Online

Discovering American Women's History Online

http://digital.mtsu.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/women

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Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States A spectacular historical atlas refashioned for the 21st century Here you will find one of the greatest historical atlases: Charles O. Paullin and John K. Wright's Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, first published in 1932. This digital edition reproduces all of the atlas's nearly 700 maps. Many of these beautiful maps are enhanced here in ways impossible in print, animated to show change over time or made clickable to view the underlying data—remarkable maps produced eight decades ago with the functionality of the twenty-first century.

Meet Jane, the 14-year-old eaten when the first British settlers in America turned to cannibalism: The macabre secrets of starving pioneers besieged by Red Indians Skull of a 14-year-old girl, named 'Jane of Jamestown', shows scratch marks Anthropologists from the Smith-sonian National Museum of Natural History analysed her skull and severed leg bones Dr Douglas Owsley said bones evidence of 'survival cannibalism' Human remains date back to the deadly winter of 1609-1610, known as the 'starving time' in Jamestown, when hundreds of colonists died By Annabel Venning for MailOnline Published: 22:35 GMT, 15 May 2013 | Updated: 22:35 GMT, 15 May 2013 She had arrived in America only a few months earlier. After a stormy 16-week voyage across the Atlantic, Jane, a 14-year-old girl from southern England, would have been relieved to reach land when she scrambled ashore at Jamestown, the first permanent English colony in America, in August 1609. But any sense of salvation was to be short-lived.

The Student as Historian: An Interactive TAH Webinar The life & age of woman. Stages of woman's life from the cradle to the grave [1848] I think that this was a great learning experience. 'Politics Ain’t the Same' — How the 19th Amendment Changed American Elections - BillMoyers.com A line of suffragists march with banners that read "Come to the White House Sunday at 3," in Washington DC in 1915. (Photo by Harris & Ewing/Buyenlarge/Getty Images) My mother was born in the United States of America without the right to vote. I just stopped to re-read that sentence because it seems so, you know, quaint.

In Canada, First Nation Community Declares State Of Emergency Over Suicide Attempts The isolated Cree community of Attawapiskat — shown several years ago, in a photo by the Toronto Star — struggled all winter with a high rate of suicide attempts. Spencer Wynn/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Spencer Wynn/Toronto Star via Getty Images The isolated Cree community of Attawapiskat — shown several years ago, in a photo by the Toronto Star — struggled all winter with a high rate of suicide attempts. Spencer Wynn/Toronto Star via Getty Images ‘Slam-dunk’ find puts hunter-gatherers in Florida 14,500 years ago Big game hunters of the Clovis culture may have just gotten the final blow to their reputation as North America’s earliest settlers. At least 1,000 years before Clovis people roamed the Great Plains, a group of hunter-gatherers either butchered a mastodon or scavenged its carcass on Florida’s Gulf Coast. Stone tools discovered in an underwater sinkhole in the Aucilla River show that people were present at the once-dry Page-Ladson site about 14,550 years ago, reports a team led by geoarchaeologists Jessi Halligan of Florida State University in Tallahassee and Michael Waters of Texas A&M University in College Station. The Clovis people appeared in North America around 13,000 years ago. Radiocarbon dating of twigs, seeds and plant fragments from submerged sediment layers provides a solid age estimate for six stone artifacts excavated by scuba divers, the team reports May 13 in Science Advances.

The War for Independence Through Seneca Eyes: Mary Jemison Views the Revolution, 1775-79 The American Revolution divided Indian communities as well as Euro-American ones. Captured at the age of fifteen along the Pennsylvania frontier and adopted and integrated into a Seneca community, Mary Jemison watched the war through the eyes of a wife and mother. The Iroquois attempted to remain neutral in the conflict, and Jemison watched tribal leaders return from a meeting with Patriot colonists at German Flats, secure in their belief that Indian neutrality would be respected. Instead, the British sought to attract Iroquois support and four of the six Iroquois nations declared their allegiance to the crown. Soon, Seneca lands became a battleground and their fields were laid waste by the colonists’ scorched earth tactics. Jemison described the ensuing destruction and disease in 1823 when she related her life story to James Seaver, a local doctor near her home among the Iroquois of western New York.

The Rise and Not-Quite-Fall of Religion in American Politics by Derek Beres Religion and politics are old bedfellows generally—for millennia the two were indistinguishable. But to understand how we've arrived at where we are today, we need only travel back to the last great economic crash: the Great Depression. As Americans were trying to piece together any semblance of identity, and as Roosevelt initiated the sweeping reforms of the New Deal, a grumbling was heard emanating from conservative America. And those grumblers decided religion was the missing piece in their evolving jigsaw. In America, the Right began embracing religion with capitalistic furor in the thirties, so argues Princeton history professor Kevin M Kruse.

The Real Reason America Used Nuclear Weapons Against Japan. It Was Not To End the War Or Save Lives. Like all Americans, I was taught that the U.S. dropped nuclear bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in order to end WWII and save both American and Japanese lives. But most of the top American military officials at the time said otherwise. The U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey group, assigned by President Truman to study the air attacks on Japan, produced a report in July of 1946 that concluded (52-56):

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