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Magazine

Magazine

http://learnenglishteens.britishcouncil.org/magazine

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Mock Reading Paper - Culture Shock This reading test contains 10 questions. You should spend about 20 minutes on this task. To make it more authentic, download the test and do it with pen and paper. Read the passage below and answer questions 1-10. Seen At 11: Real Life ‘Superheroes’ Take Matters Into Their Own Hands Donning Homemade Protective Gear, Costumes They Work To Protect Gotham May 9, 2013 11:40 PM From our newsroom to your inbox weekday mornings at 9AM. Sign Up Behind the News Weekdays: 20/02/2017 watch What's your question? Have you seen or heard something in the news you'd like explained? WHAT’S GOING ON IN THIS PICTURE - The Learning Network Blog Photo Students 1. After looking closely at the image above (or at the full-size image), think about these three questions: What is going on in this picture?

Cohesion: linking words and phrases 1.33 Cohesion: linking words and phrases You can use words or short phrases which help to guide your reader through your writing, and to link sentences, paragraphs and sections both forwards and backwards. Good use will make what you have written easy to follow; bad use might mean your style is disjointed, probably with too many short sentences, and consequently difficult to follow. Your mark could be affected either way. The best way to "get a feel" for these words is through your reading.

Extreme Photo of the Week Photograph by Mike Schirf “I love the skiing down the best, but I don't love the skinning up,” says 11-year-old Lilliana Libecki, seen here with her dad, Mike, on their recent sailing-skiing expedition to the Antarctic Peninsula in front of Paradise Bay and a colony of Gentoo penguins. It was Lilliana’s very first expedition with her dad, a National Geographic Adventurer of the Year, Expeditions Council grantee, and veteran of 50-some remote expeditions. “I will never ever forget the skiing and icebergs and how curious and unafraid the penguins were,” Liliana says. Sounds Familiar? What you can hear You can listen to 71 sound recordings and over 600 short audio clips chosen from two collections of the British Library Sound Archive: the Survey of English Dialects and the Millennium Memory Bank. You’ll hear Londoners discussing marriage and working life, Welsh teenagers talking with pride about being bilingual and the Aristocracy chatting about country houses. You can explore the links between present-day Geordie and our Anglo-Saxon and Viking past or discover why Northern Irish accents are a rich blend of seventeenth century English and Scots. You can study changes in pronunciation among the middle classes or find out how British Asians express their linguistic identity.

English exercises - grammar exercises - learn English online ENGLISH EXERCISES. Hundreds of free exercises to learn English online: grammar exercises, verbs exercises,songs, vocabulary activities, listening, reading, videos. Phonetics, movies, grammar worksheets, flashcards, dictionary, learning.. Custom Search Immigrant earnings ‘a failure’ - Göteborg Daily Refugees and other immigrant groups are finding it hard to establish themselves in the labour market, even after 10 years in Sweden, suggests a report from daily newspaper Dagens Nyheter. The newspaper followed the progress of nearly 15,500 immigrants of working age who received permanent residency in 2004 and are still registered in Sweden. After ten years, those who came here as refugees earned a median wage of only 11,100 kronor per month - less than half the figure for the entire population. Around three out of ten receive welfare benefits from the municipality. Another group who had problems establishing themselves were those who came here to be with relatives.

IELTS Skills Testing and English coaching INSTRUCTIONS: In this exercise you will get an opportunity to practise typing in numbers as you hear them dictated during a recorded lecture. Start the recording below and fill in the spaces with the numbers as they are spoken in the gaps provided below. Only use numbers and common numbered formats. For example, "2nd" would be marked as correct, but not "second". And don't forget to employ standard written usage and correct punctuation when formatting numbers large numbers.

Related:  British Council, BBCNews