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How To Make Students Better Online Researchers

I recently came across an article in Wired Magazine called “ Why Kids Can’t Search “. I’m always interested in this particular topic, because it’s something I struggle with in my middle and high school classes constantly, and I know I’m not alone in my frustrations. Getting kids to really focus on what exactly they are searching for, and then be able to further distill idea into a few key specific search terms is a skill that we must teach students, and we have to do it over and over again. We never question the vital importance of teaching literacy, but we have to be mindful that there are many kinds of “literacies”. An ever more important one that ALL teachers need to be aware of is digital literacy. I could go off in many directions on this, but for the purpose of this post I’m focusing strictly on the digital literacy of searching. As they get older, kids often employ the tactic of typing a question into the search bar – “How do I find out about mummies in Egypt?” The real answer? 1.

http://edudemic.com/2012/09/students-online-researchers/

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21st Century Fluencies The Essential Fluencies The Essential Fluencies of innovative learning are structured processes for developing the skills that your students need to succeed, today and in the future. Get Started Now Five-Minute Film Festival: Teaching Digital Citizenship "Digital citizenship" is an umbrella term that covers a whole host of important issues. Broadly, it's the guidelines for responsible, appropriate behavior when one is using technology. But specifically, it can cover anything from "netiquette" to cyberbullying; technology access and the digital divide; online safety and privacy; copyright, plagiarism, and digital law, and more. In fact, some programs that teach digital citizenship have outlined no less than nine elements that intersect to inform a well-equipped digital citizen. It's an overwhelming array of skills to be taught and topics to explore. But while there is much talk about the importance of teaching digital citizenship in this information society, not many are sure what that really looks like.

Plagiarism You have something in common with the smartest people in the world. You see, everyone has ideas. We use our minds to create something original, whether it’s a poem, a drawing, a song, or a scientific paper. Some of the most important ideas are published and make it into books, journals, newspapers and trustworthy websites that become the building blocks for things we all learn. But ideas are also very personal, and we need dependable ways to keep track of the people behind the ideas we use because they deserve credit for their contribution, just as you do if someone uses your idea. Passing off another person’s ideas or words as your own, without credit, is called plagiarism.

A Broader View of Digital Literacy « JISC PADDLE Project October 4, 2012 at 9:33 am Pete At the project meeting this week we discussed the need for a broader view of digital literacy.Project members will refine the following ideas before looking again at the frameworks for specific staff and student cohorts (more to follow on these). Looking again at Digital Literacy definitions, Futurelab provides a compact statement: To be digitally literate is to have access to a broad range of practices and cultural resources that you are able to apply to digital tools. Infographics for Educators We live in a world of quick consumption, bite-size morsels of information, and visualizations of just about everything. All of this has become boiled down into the uber-popular infographic. They pop up from time to time on Edudemic and I often have a tough time determining if I should actually run versus another. I’ve been saving up all of my favorite infographics for a post just like this one. An all-in-one no-extra-clicking-necessary post where you can scroll for miles and have a never-ending stream of visualized goodness.

How To Get Rid Of Facebook Notifications & Other Annoying Things You Don’t Want To See [Weekly Facebook Tips] It’s funny how sometimes you can use an online service all the time, getting annoyed at little things without realising there’s an easy way to do something about it. Several of my friends who use Facebook almost every day recently told me how they hate always getting Facebook notifications for dumb games people want them to play, or updates about these games in their home feed. Obviously, if these people can be avid Facebook users without knowing there’s a fix, then there’s bound to be a few more of you out there too. As I can’t even begin to imagine the horrors of using Facebook with all those annoyances in my face, I feel I should go back to basics here and make sure everyone knows how to get rid of them. If the post doesn’t apply to you, you no doubt know a friend or two who might be able to make use of the knowledge. Getting Rid Of Unwanted Notifications

Writing "Original” Papers § Harvard Guide to Using Sources Some writing assignments you receive at Harvard will explicitly ask you to present an "original" thesis, claim, or idea. But even when the word "original" isn't mentioned, you should assume that your professor expects you to develop a thesis that is the product of your own thinking and not something drawn directly from a source and planted in your paper. Occasionally an assignment will require only a summary of your reading, particularly if the instructor wants to make sure you have understood a particularly complex concept; however, some assignments may be worded in a way that leaves expectations ambiguous (you may be asked, for example, to "discuss" or "consider" a source), and you may think you are only expected to summarize when, in fact, you are expected to make an argument. When in doubt about whether you are supposed to make an argument in your paper, always check with your instructor to make sure you understand what you're expected to do.

Resources for Data Literacy The single most important tool I’ve found for improving Digital Literacy is Wolfram Alpha. At your fingertips, whether on your phone, tablet, or laptop, you have access to all the world’s readily available data. All you have to do is ask. The best thing I can do to improve data literacy is to teach students (and other adults I know) to question the facts they are being quoted as gospel. Here are a bunch of searches I’ve done recently to verify or refute data someone has told me in conversation. While my top choice for digital literacy is Wolfram Alpha, there are some other resources that are great for understanding, interpreting, and visualizing data.

Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? “Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu last week.

Information Literacy - Home What is Information Literacy? Information Literacy is the ability to identify what information is needed, understand how the information is organized, identify the best sources of information for a given need, locate those sources, evaluate the sources critically, and share that information. It is the knowledge of commonly used research techniques. Information literacy is critically important because we are surrounded by a growing ocean of information in all formats. Not all information is created equal: some is authoritative, current, reliable, but some is biased, out of date, misleading, false. The amount of information available is going to keep increasing.

Plagiarism detection in PowerPoint presentations Googling the phrase "bullets imply no significant order" yields many jackpot matches with the Harvard-Florida work. These slides listed below may have, however, made an appropriate attribution of the original source, something that can be verified by examining the relevant slides. [PDF] Guidelines for Effective Visuals File Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML Bullets imply no significant order. *. Use numbers only to show rank or sequence. ?? 2002 Institute for Healthcare Improvement. Information Skills for a 21st Century Scotland - Discussion Board - Meeting on 30th August Information Literacy Community of Practice meeting held at the Scottish Government Offices, Victoria Quay on Thursday 30th August 2012, 11.30 am – Notes on the meeting Present: John Crawford (CILIP Trustee), Abigail Mawhirt (Dundee College), Morag Higgison (Scottish Government), Cleo Jones (City of Edinburgh Council), Ian McCracken (Retired School Librarian), Alice Heywood (substituting for Veronica Denholm Education Officer National Library of Scotland (NLS), Lindsay McKrell (Stirling Council), Ruth Gould (Aberdeen Council), Gillian Hanlon (SLIC), Linda Sutherland (Glasgow Life), Laura Hogg (Glasgow Life), Christine Irving (Independent Information Professional), Marion Kelt (Senior Librarian, Digital Development and Information Literacy, Glasgow Caledonian University) Jenny Foreman (Scottish Government), 2 Individual introductions- Attendees introduced themselves and described their particular areas of interest.

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