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Design reference

Design reference

http://www.thetreehouseguide.com/

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Reduce tree damage If a treehouse is designed poorly it is easy to cause damage to the tree, but by following some simple guidelines you can minimise damage as much as possible. It is impossible to cause no damage at all, but trees have evolved several techniques to tolerate damage and remain healthy. As trees are living organisms, they differ from familiar building materials in the following four ways. They can be infected by bacteria and viruses, causing loss of branches or death to the whole tree They slowly grow larger over time, increasing the diameter of their trunk every year They use a process called compartmentalisation to isolate damaged or infected areas They will compensate for a changed weight distribution

So you want to install a Garnier limb? Author’s note: This post was originally published in late 2008, and for those of you about to try your hand at treehouse construction and setting Garnier limbs, I hope this gives you a good start. My treehouse business has since suspended operation, but I leave this post here because it still seems to help people find the knowledge and the courage to build a dream or two. For allowing me to be of that service, I thank you all. And remember, when doing any project, enjoy and stay safe.

Tree Houses - Fasteners & Bolts for Tree Houses - Construction of Treehouses Professional fasteners for tree houses are the key to building safe and long lasting tree houses. The most important part of constructing tree houses is how the tree houses are attached to the tree. While different builders have preferences on attachment methods, there are definitely dangerous and wrong ways to attach tree houses. You are well advised to make sure that you understand how your tree house will be attached to the tree before you hire anyone to build your tree house. Quality fasteners for tree houses are created to meet two needs: 1) so strong that they will never fail until long after the wood of the tree fails under the load, if ever, and 2) they perch the tree houses main beams several inches from the trunk, which gives trees years or decades of space to increase in girth (growth rate is species dependent) before the interface of the treehouse and the tree needs to be altered.

Fantasy Forest Tree House 8:57pm | Aug 21st, 2010 If this looks large to you, imagine how big it would seem to someone half your size or smaller. Like some childrens picture-book come to life, this ‘Enchanted Forest‘ wooden tree house may look a bit kitsch to us as adults from a design perspective – but for kids it is one very cool combination of fairy tale magic and real-life adventure. Held up by a combination of wooden beams and actual tree trunks, a spiral staircase connects this series of interdependent levels to effectively create a single (narrative) structure out of a number of semi-autonomous rooms and floors along the way. Each platform affords places to play as well as increasingly interesting views of the surrounding treescapes.

How to 2 Steps Part 1 Preparing to Build Your Treehouse <img alt="Image titled Build a Treehouse Step 1" src=" width="728" height="546" class="whcdn" onload="WH.performance.clearMarks('image1_rendered'); WH.performance.mark('image1_rendered');">1Choose the right tree. The health of the tree you select is absolutely crucial for building a foundation for your treehouse. This Self-Healing House uses plants, moss, and birds to create a living facade Some might think metropolitan living means you can’t commune with nature, but designer Edwin Indera Waskita’s Self-Healing House shatters that misconception. Waskita’s project transforms barrier-like walls into a scaffolding for plants, mosses, and birds to mingle with the human residents inside. By encouraging the growth of plant life, birds are lured to the spot and deposit seeds for more greenery to grow. The result is a space that perfectly unifies nature and modern living. Waskita’s proposal would create a balanced symbiosis with the surrounding natural world while providing housing for those in the world’s busiest cities.

How to build a treehouse There are definite advantages in using more than one tree for your treehouse - the treehouse can be bigger, and you have to use less bracing. The tree(s) you see here (behind the magnolia!) are a very tightly grown group of three trunks - they all touch at the base, and splay out somewhat as they grow upwards. At the height of the treehouse - about 9 ft (2.7 m) off the ground - one pair of trunks are still almost touching, and the other one is about 4 ft (1.2 m) away. This means the design has been based on one for a close-spaced pair of trees, rather than for a group of three. The trees are Garry oaks, and they don't grow much further north than this (southern Vancouver Island), so they grow pretty slow here.

Fantasy Forest Tree House Straight out of a Kids Story Book If this looks large to you, imagine how big it would seem to someone half your size or smaller. Like some childrens picture-book come to life, this ‘Enchanted Forest‘ wooden tree house may look a bit kitsch to us as adults from a design perspective – but for kids it is one very cool combination of fairy tale magic and real-life adventure. Held up by a combination of wooden beams and actual tree trunks, a spiral staircase connects this series of interdependent levels to effectively create a single (narrative) structure out of a number of semi-autonomous rooms and floors along the way. Each platform affords places to play as well as increasingly interesting views of the surrounding treescapes. Part of a larger theme park in the rural old-growth forests of British Columbia, this is part of a sizable fantasy-themed environment that blends natural wonders, wild animals and folklore classics both old and new in a kid-friendly resort setting.

A field guide We finished Irena's version 2.0 tree house this weekend. The kids and I have been working on it for 3 weekends, and this is as far as it's going to go this round. Along the way I came across several tree house videos that I would like to share (and store here) in case we ever go to version 3.0. Which is doubtful, because the "next level" in tree house architecture seems to get a lot more expensive and probably requires permits. Here is one amazing tree house from Wisconsin: A multi-level, multi-tree tree house with rope bridge and zip line: Take a peek inside this magical 1969 hippie tree house village in Hawaii At the edge of a long winding beach road, on the shaded jungle island of Kauai, sat a tiny village paradise where clothing was optional, weed was smoked openly, and where love and freedom were the only law. Taylor Camp provided home to the restless young minds who hungered to escape the turbulence of their generation. From the distress of the Vietnam War, young transplants of surfers, hippies, families, and veterans from around the country flocked to live in makeshift tree house made of bamboo and tin. Here, they found an inner peace and independence that had alluded them in their previous lives, though some came to escape the draft or the stronghold of law, what they found were friends, lovers, brothers, and some of the best memories of their lives. When photographer John Wehrheim arrived in Kauai in 1971 he was only twenty-three years old, carrying all his worldly possessions: a bong, a surfboard, and a camera in a single bag. Sources: slate.com, blogspot.com, featureshoot.com

The Treehouse Guide - Types of tree house support Construction tutorial - Supports You need to decide on the right way to fit your floor into the tree. First of all, you must know a few simple facts about trees: Trees move This is the No. 1 problem most people get stuck on.

20 Tree House Pictures: Play-Club Plans to Big-Kid Houses Treehouses are more popular than ever, as play spaces for children but also as luxury hotel (and even house) designs for adults. Some of the most fantastic plans and ideas can be traced to specialist designers and builders – and pictures of their work can provide some of the best inspiration (as well as an informal visual guide) for do-it-yourself recreational, residential and commercial tree buildings. Blue Forest is one such company, but far from the only one. Their specialty seems to lie somewhere between playful little fantasy structures and big educational spaces for children engaged in wildlife observation, forest ecology and related nature-oriented pursuits. The trick is to find a balance between safe and fun – railings are a must, as are sturdy supports, but whimsy and asymmetry help make these places feel more organic and engaging for younger visitors in particular. Some are like mansions, fortresses or castles – just set up on stilts instead of sitting on the ground.

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