background preloader

Douglas Rushkoff - Home

Douglas Rushkoff - Home
Latest Projects Generation Like explores how the perennial teen quest for identity and connection has migrated to social media — and exposes the game of cat-and-mouse that corporations are playing with these young consumers. Premieres February 18 on PBS Present Shock: When Everything Happens Now Click Here to Buy "This is a wondrously thought-provoking book.

http://www.rushkoff.com/

Related:  Cultural ChangeMedia, social media and New media

Media Commentary — Callie Schweitzer How We Internet: Finding the right news among too many options: The days of waiting for the newspaper thud outside the front door are over, and it’s no longer up to the editors of the New York Times to decide the lead story of the day. The process of getting news involves more choice than ever. We have access to unlimited options and sources to fill what seems like ever more limited time. This paradox of choice can be incredibly overwhelming if it’s not streamlined or ritualized in some way — hence why we form news reading habits.

New Rules for the New Economy 1) Embrace the Swarm. As power flows away from the center, the competitive advantage belongs to those who learn how to embrace decentralized points of control. 2) Increasing Returns. Mitchel Resnick I'm the LEGO Papert Professor of Learning Research at the MIT Media Lab, where I lead the Lifelong Kindergarten research group. My group develops Scratch, the world's leading coding platform for kids. To learn more about my ideas and projects, please read my book Lifelong Kindergarten: Cultivating Creativity through Projects, Passions, Peers, and Play Disruptive versus Radical Innovations Clayton Christenson’s seminal The Innovator’s Dilemma is now 10 years old, and its central idea of “disruptive innovation” is now part of the everyday language of innovation. Recently, I finally read the book after having loosely tossed the term around for a few years.

About - Digital Media Research Centre Our vision The Digital Media Research Centre (DMRC) conducts world-leading research that helps society understand and adapt to the social, cultural and economic transformations associated with digital media technologies. Aims and objectives Digital media have become a near-ubiquitous part of our everyday lives. They are associated with widespread cultural and social change ranging from personal interactions through to industry and political debate, provoking both opportunity and anxiety. New technological developments like big data, locative media and wearable technologies challenge social science and humanities researchers to develop new approaches and methods, and to train upcoming researchers in how to apply them.

Developing Next-Gen Profiles: Collaboratory Mockup I’ve been having a lot of fun the past few weeks fleshing out our next-gen profiles for the Collaboratory. One of the things I think is critical for any sufficiently advanced social network is a way for us to actually express who we are as human beings – emotion, passion, intent, inherent gifts, and the like. The problem with Facebook and LinkedIn is they predefine the scope of what it means to be human. Computational Thinking Computing At School Computational Thinking Material on Computational Thinking and related topics Created by Peter Dickman last edited Feb 20 2018 by Simon Peyton Jones CAS resources Exiting The Anthropocene and Entering The Symbiocene. Exiting The Anthropocene It has been proposed that humans are now living within a period of the Earth’s history appropriately named ‘The Anthropocene’ (Crutzen and Stoermer 2000). The name is derived from the observed human influence and indeed dominance of all climatic, biophysical and evolutionary processes occurring at a planetary scale.

Joho the BlogJoho the Blog - Let's just see what happens The hosts of the BardCast podcast consider Cymbeline to probably be Shakespeare’s worst play. Not enough happens in the first two acts, the plot is kuh-razy, it’s a mishmash of styles and cultures, and it over-explains itself time and time again. That podcast is far from alone in thinking that it’s the Bard’s worst, although, as BardCast says, even the Bard’s worst is better than just about anything.

Superhero School: An Epicenter for Disruptive Innovation I put a short post up a few days ago in an online group I’m in, with the above image and this brief description: superhero school. center for disruptive innovation. continuous learning zone. collective intelligence. live/work startup incubator. community center. hackerspace. makerlab. autonomous zone. permaculture and sustainable food production. cooperatively owned communications infrastructure. resilience. r&d lab. a place for creative troublemakers. hudson valley. i want this to exist. It blew up to over 100 comments in less than 48 hours, with many people sharing their own thoughts and plans and existing initiatives to create similar things in their areas. I was inspired!

Panarchy Panarchy What is Panarchy? Panarchy is a conceptual framework to account for the dual, and seemingly contradictory, characteristics of all complex systems – stability and change. It is the study of how economic growth and human development depend on ecosystems and institutions, and how they interact. It is an integrative framework, bringing together ecological, economic and social models of change and stability, to account for the complex interactions among both these different areas, and different scale levels (see Scale Levels).

Related: