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NZ History Online - The Gallipoli campaign

NZ History Online - The Gallipoli campaign
Each year on Anzac Day, New Zealanders (and Australians) mark the anniversary of the Gallipoli landings of 25 April 1915. On that day, thousands of young men, far from their homes, stormed the beaches on the Gallipoli Peninsula in what is now Turkey. For eight long months, New Zealand troops, alongside those from Australia, Great Britain and Ireland, France, India, and Newfoundland battled harsh conditions and Ottoman forces desperately fighting to protect their homeland. By the time the campaign ended, more than 130,000 men had died: at least 87,000 Ottoman soldiers and 44,000 Allied soldiers, including more than 8700 Australians. Among the dead were 2779 New Zealanders, about a fifth of all those who had landed on the peninsula. In the wider story of the First World War, the Gallipoli campaign made no large mark.

http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/war/the-gallipoli-campaign/introduction

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National Library resources: Gallipoli Campaign Image: Anzac Cove, Gallipoli by State Library of South Australia on Flickr This year, 2015, is the 100 year anniversary since the landing of ANZAC troops on the beaches of Gallipoli, Turkey. Discover the history and what happened with the landing of the New Zealand and Australian troops. These resources have been selected to support this popular topic – Gallipoli SCIS 1674365 Battle of Gallipoli - World War I With World War I stalled on the Western Front by 1915, the Allied Powers were debating going on the offensive in another region of the conflict, rather than continuing with attacks in Belgium and France. Early that year, Russia’s Grand Duke Nicholas appealed to Britain for aid in confronting a Turkish invasion in the Caucasus. (The Ottoman Empire had entered World War I on the side of the Central Powers, Germany and Austria-Hungary, by November 1914.) In response, the Allies decided to launch a naval expedition to seize the Dardanelles Straits, a narrow passage connecting the Aegean Sea to the Sea of Marmara in northwestern Turkey. If successful, capture of the straits would allow the Allies to link up with the Russians in the Black Sea, where they could work together to knock Turkey out of the war.

BBC Schools - Life in the trenches 31 October 2014Last updated at 15:07 Two British soldiers standing in a flooded communication trench during World War One On the Western Front, the war was fought in trenches. Significance of Anzac Day - Anzac Day Guide On 25 April 1915, eight months into the First World War, Allied soldiers landed on the shores of the Gallipoli peninsula. This was Turkish territory that formed part of Germany's ally, the Ottoman Empire. The troops were there as part of a plan to open the Dardanelles Strait to the Allied fleets, allowing them to threaten the Ottoman capital Constantinople (now Istanbul) and, it was hoped, force a Turkish surrender.

Stretcher Bearers Advancing troops were not allowed to stop and care for wounded soldiers. All men carried an emergency field-dressing and if possible attempted to treat their own wounds. The wounded soldier then had to wait until the stretcher-bearers arrived. There were only four stretcher-bearers per company and so it was often sometime before they received medical help. Some dragged themselves into a shell-hole for protection, but this was dangerous as many sank into the mud and drowned.

NZ on Screen - Gallipoli search results The World War I Collection Curated by NZ On Screen Team 2014 marks the centennial of the start of World War I. Over 100,000 New Zealanders served overseas in the 'Great War'. WW100 New Zealand A selection of sites and sources for learning about the history of the First World War from a New Zealand perspective, and the role your family members might have played in it. Soldiers inside the YMCA library in Beauvois, France. Ref: 1/2-013635-G. Courtesy of Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. Starting Places Use these websites to start your learning journey. Traditions and Rituals - Anzac Day Guide The Anzac Day ceremony is rich in tradition and ritual. It is, essentially, a military funeral, with all the solemnity and symbolism such an event entails: uniformed service personnel standing motionless around a memorial, with heads bowed and weapons reversed; a bier of wreaths laid by the mourners; the chaplain reading the words from the military burial service; the firing of three volleys; and the playing of the Last Post, followed by a prayer, hymn, and benediction. The secular ceremony Many Anzac Day ceremonies occur at war memorials. There are nearly 500 civic First World War memorials in New Zealand, most of which were erected in the 1920s. Until that time, the ceremonies took place in public buildings or churches, and sometimes had a strong religious focus.

The New Zealanders at Gallipoli Victoria University of Wellington Library [advanced search] Title: The New Zealanders at Gallipoli Author: Fred Waite Open School BC History 12 Course Resource General Modern World History: Great matirial on Fascism in Italy, the Rise of Hitler, and Nazi Germany. The League of Nations (Keywords: League, Nations, Abyssinia, Manchuria, Nanking) Introduction: Good introductory sites on the League can be found at: Appeal to the League of Nations: For the text of Emperor Haile Selassie's appeal to the League of Nations to save his country from the Italian invastion go to: Papers Past - search newspaper articles from 1915 through to 1945 Skip to content English | Māori Masthead of the Taranaki Herald 01 July 1865

Recreating Gallipoli in Minecraft As part of our centenary education programme, Auckland Museum is making use of the popular Minecraft® game to engage students with the events that occurred at Gallipoli in 1915. Minecraft® is an award-winning game that encourages creativity and adventure. It allows game players to break and place blocks working together to create virtual structures, landscapes, and worlds. 2014 saw Auckland Museum team up with Media Design School, Alfriston College and some select Minecraft builders to recreate Gallipoli as it was during the First World War. They have been creating a reusable learning resource so that Kiwis of all ages can learn more about this important part of our history.

Anzac Day - Anzac Day Anzac Day occurs on 25 April. It commemorates all New Zealanders killed in war and also honours returned servicemen and women. The date itself marks the anniversary of the landing of New Zealand and Australian soldiers – the Anzacs – on the Gallipoli Peninsula in 1915. The aim was to capture the Dardanelles, the gateway to the Bosphorus and the Black Sea. At the end of the campaign, Gallipoli was still held by its Turkish defenders. Build your First World War school programme - Education - Auckland War Memorial Museum One Hundred years on from the First World War: 2014 – 2018 We provide a wide range of educational opportunities to help engage students with the events of the First World War. These include onsite educator led programmes, onsite independent programmes and gallery links, competitions and more. Education programmes (educator led) Years 1 - 8 Examine the events and experiences of the First World War with our educator-led programmes for primary and intermediate students.

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