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WW2 Tweets from 1940 (RealTimeWWII)

http://twitter.com/RealTimeWWII

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42 Interactive History Lessons From Google If you’re looking for a free and useful tool to help bring history to life, Google has you covered. The search giant has been making big strides into education lately and classrooms around the world are benefiting. The Google Cultural Institute is an elegantly designed but elaborate resource that offers a glimpse into key happenings from years past. The website uses a horizontal-scrolling timeline view to help create a sense of time passing. There’s multimedia, interaction, and a lot to learn. Here’s a few more details from Google : Retelling history, 140 characters at a time - CNET Spoiler alert: The Cuban Missile Crisis ended without the United States and the Soviet Union launching even a single nuclear weapon, and the Allies won World War II. You're no doubt well aware of those ultimate outcomes, but what if you don't remember, or never knew, the myriad individual moments, big and small, that led to those famous conclusions? There are plenty of thick history books you could pick up, but maybe you're someone who wants a more dramatic sense of what happened -- even, perhaps, to feel like you're right in the thick of the drama. To be sure, there's no time machine that can take you back to London during The Blitz, or to the White House Situation Room as JFK stood firm against belligerent military leaders wanting to engage the Soviets over surreptitiously putting nukes in Cuba. But these days, in little 140-character snippets, many of those moments are being played out for the whole world to see. And if you close your eyes, you can almost imagine you're there.

Today in History: Surrender at Yorktown Featured Image: Winged Time April 3, 2014 By Barat PSN Leave a Comment Curator’s note from the Library of Congress online exhibition: The Dream of Flight On these pages, the English poet and illustrator, William Blake, depicts the personification of “Time” as having wings.

mashable We're constantly amazed by how the communication of news has changed over the past decade alone. A top NATO commander announced the end of the Libyan mission on Facebook, news of Osama Bin Laden's death set a Twitter record, and news, photos and video of the Occupy Wall Street movement has spread like wildfire over social media. SEE ALSO: We Hold These Tweets To Be Self-Evident [COMIC] The Great War Archive Dec 25. The Christmas Truce Sergeant Bernard Brookes was a signaller who spent ten months in Flanders in the beginning of the War before he suffered shellshock and was invalided out of active service. During his convalescence he wrote up the notes he had made during his service, giving a personal, unsentimental account of the appalling conditions in the trenches as well as humorous exploits on and off duty.Here are two short extracts relating to the famous Christmas Truce 1914: 24 December 1914: "An officer went out (after we had stood at our posts with rifles loaded in case of treachery) and arrangements were made that between 10.00am and noon, and from 2.00pm to 4.00pm tomorrow, intercourse between the Germs [sic] and ourselves should take place. It was a beautiful night and a sharp frost set in, and when we awoke in the morning the ground was covered with a white raiment.

Teaching Twitter: The History of the Present "140 characters is a novel when you’re being shot at."—Anonymous tweet during the Iranian Green Revolution One of the chief historical skills taught in all classrooms is source analysis. Internet History Sourcebooks Project Internet History Sourcebooks Project Paul Halsall, Editor Last Modified: Dec 11 | linked pages may have been updated more recently The Internet History Sourcebooks Project is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted historical texts presented cleanly (without advertising or excessive layout) for educational use. 1. This project is both very large and fairly old in Internet terms. The Reaction GIF: Moving Image as Gesture Organized by Jason Eppink, Associate Curator of Digital Media Computer-mediated communication increasingly informs the way we interact with friends and peers. Email, text message, chat, and any number of social websites and mobile apps focus conversation primarily into text, supplanting the many nonverbal cues like rhythm, intonation, volume, and gesture that humans have used to communicate for many millennia. But over the last few years, the reaction GIF has emerged as a form for communicating with short moving images in response to, and often in lieu of, text in online forums and comment threads. These animated GIFs consist of brief loops of bodies in motion, primarily excerpted from recognizable pop culture moments, and are used to express common ideas and emotions. Understood as gestures, they can communicate more nuance and concision than their verbal translations.

54 Teaching and Lesson Plan Ideas for History Teachers #sschat Since I've recently given a set of my curated plans for math teachers, English teachers and general common core standards (see end of this post), I thought I'd share some lessons for history teachers. If you're a history teacher and not following #sschat on Twitter, you should. This is a set of 12 lessons about what it was like for children to live in the second world war. I love this set of lessons because it builds empathy and helps teach the story of world war 2 from a child's perspective. September 11 is coming up. While it is still very hard for many of us to even talk about this day, we have a whole 11+ years of our students who have no memory of this event.

Spatial Montage and Multimedia Ethnography: Using Computers to Visualise Aspects of Migration and Social Division Among a Displaced Community Volume 11, No. 2, Art. 36 – May 2010 Spatial Montage and Multimedia Ethnography: Using Computers to Visualise Aspects of Migration and Social Division Among a Displaced Community Judith Aston Abstract: This paper discusses how computer-based techniques of spatial montage can be used to visualise aspects of migration and social division among a displaced community. It is based on an ongoing collaboration between the author and the anthropologist, Wendy JAMES.

13 Good Resources for Social Studies Teachers I recently met an old colleague of mine for breakfast. Steve and I team taught a course together for a couple of years before he retired a few years ago. During our conversation he said to me, "Richard, what I knew you were good at was finding things our students liked." Coming from Steve, whose opinions I hold in high regards, took that as a compliment and as a reminder that I haven't published a good list for fellow social studies teachers in quite a while. Therefore, this evening I sat down and combed through my archives to pick what I think are some off the better free resources for social studies teachers and students.

A user chooses when and where to exit a database narrative; where a user enters, as with most narratives, is usually through a designed portal. Certain types of networked, distributed or transmedia narratives do have multiple entry points, where an encounter with a narrative segment leads to a maze of other segments. But the opening interface to a database is a staged entry and may offer a broad, restricted or randomly generated set of files and paths. Entry points can establish narrative frames, metaphors for navigation , genre motifs, present views of data sets, describe elements of plot, character, setting or theme – or withhold any and all of these. However the interface is designed, the entry point prepares the user for interaction and most importantly the desire for interaction. In Jonathan Harris’ interactive photo essay The Whale Hunt, the entry point is a grid of small indecipherable images.

13 Good Resources for Social Studies Teachers I recently met an old colleague of mine for breakfast. Steve and I team taught a course together for a couple of years before he retired a few years ago. During our conversation he said to me, "Richard, what I knew you were good at was finding things our students liked." Coming from Steve, whose opinions I hold in high regards, took that as a compliment and as a reminder that I haven't published a good list for fellow social studies teachers in quite a while. Therefore, this evening I sat down and combed through my archives to pick what I think are some off the better free resources for social studies teachers and students.

What is Database (DB)? Webopedia Definition Main » TERM » D » By Vangie Beal (1) Often abbreviated DB, a database is basically a collection of information organized in such a way that a computer program can quickly select desired pieces of data. You can think of a database as an electronic filing system. Traditional databases are organized by fields, records, and files. A field is a single piece of information; a record is one complete set of fields; and a file is a collection of records.

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