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Famous Speeches in History — Audio Online - History.com

Famous Speeches in History — Audio Online - History.com

http://www.history.com/speeches

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Lessons From McGraw Hill: The Eurocentric Influence on History Textbooks and Classrooms Earlier this month, McGraw Hill found itself at the center of some rather embarrassing press after a photo showing a page from one of its high-school world-geography textbooks was disseminated on social media. The page features a seemingly innocuous polychromatic map of the United States, broken up into thousands of counties, as part of a lesson on the country’s immigration patterns: Different colors correspond with various ancestral groups, and the color assigned to each county indicates its largest ethnic representation. The page is scarce on words aside from an introductory summary and three text bubbles explaining specific trends—for example, that Mexico accounts for the largest share of U.S. immigrants today. The recent blunder has to do with one bubble in particular. Pointing to a patch of purple grids extending throughout the country’s Southeast corridor, the one-sentence caption reads:

A Call to Conscience: The Landmark Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr. New York: IPM/Warner Books Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., is known for being one of the greatest orators of the twentieth century, and perhaps in all of American history. In the 1950s and 1960s, his words led the Civil Rights Movement and helped change society. Who's Who in Medieval History and the Renaissance The "Who's Who in Medieval History" project is intended to help you find information about significant individuals from the Middle Ages and Renaissance, when available, on the web and in print. Each page will offer a brief explanation of who the individual was and why he or she is important or interesting in medieval and Renaissance studies. For more information, be sure to investigate the websites or books provided. Browse one of these directories for the individual you seek:

History as Science, not only Art. (History for dummies, 2) In my previous post I cited Leopold von Ranke’s famous explanation for history being an art. (I turned to von Ranke because a biblical scholar quoted von Ranke to me without knowing the source of his quotation, nor its meaning.) Now von Ranke’s philosophy of history and views on the nature of historical facts have been superseded throughout the twentieth century. 1922: The discovery of Tutankhamun's tomb — in color In 1907, Egyptologist and archaeologist Howard Carter was hired by George Herbert, the 5th Earl of Carnarvon to oversee excavations in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings. Carter had built a reputation for scrupulously recording and preserving discoveries. Carter searched the valley for years with little to show for it, which drew the ire of his employer. In 1922, Lord Carnarvon told Carter that he had only one more season of digging before his funding would be ended. Revisiting a previously abandoned dig site at a group of huts, Carter started digging again, desperate for a breakthrough.

Video Nobel Lectures from Nobel Laureates in Literature Lists of Nobel Prizes and Laureates Video Lectures from Nobel Laureates in Literature According to the Nobel Foundation statutes, the Nobel Laureates are required "to give a lecture on a subject connected with the work for which the prize has been awarded". The lecture should be given before, or no later than six months after, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony, which takes place in Stockholm or, in the case of the Peace Prize, in Oslo on 10 December. Click on the names of the Nobel Laureates in Literature below to see their Nobel Lectures. Video Nobel Lectures in: | Physics | Chemistry | Physiology or Medicine | Literature | Peace | Economic Sciences |

What Vikings really looked like The fine decoration of the Oseberg ship in Norway, which was buried in the year 834, provides clues to what Vikings looked like. Inside the ship were two women and the archaeologists believe the ship has served as a sarcophagus. (Photo: Annie Dalbéra)

SoJust.net: Social Justice and Civil Rights Speeches Bella AbzugPlenary Address, Fourth World Congress on Women (1995) John AdamsInaugural Address (1797) Jane AddamsThe Subjective Necessity for Social Settlements (1892)The Modern Lear (1896) Susan B. AnthonyOn Women's Right to Vote (1872) John BrownFinal Address to the Court (1859) How Islam Created Europe Europe was essentially defined by Islam. And Islam is redefining it now. For centuries in early and middle antiquity, Europe meant the world surrounding the Mediterranean, or Mare Nostrum (“Our Sea”), as the Romans famously called it. 10 Forgotten Nations That Once Ruled The Land History Rome annihilated Carthage to ensure it would never again rise as a major threat. The Ottomans forever ended Byzantium’s glory. The vast armies of Persia were repeatedly beaten back by the Greeks, subjugated by the might of Alexander, and destroyed by the rise of Islam. The fates of once great and proud nations fill the pages of history books—and then there are those forgotten powers even the history books seldom mention. 10BurgundyWestern Europe

11 Things You May Not Know About Ancient Egypt — HISTORY Lists Ancient Egypt stood as one of the world’s most advanced civilizations for nearly 3,000 years and created a culture so rich that it has spawned its own field of study. But while Egyptian art, architecture and burial methods have become enduring objects of fascination, there is still a lot you probably don’t know about these famed builders of the pyramids. From the earliest recorded peace treaty to ancient board games, find out 11 surprising facts about the Gift of the Nile.

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