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Black Death ("Hollaback Girl" by Gwen Stefani)

Black Death ("Hollaback Girl" by Gwen Stefani)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZy6XilXDZQ

Related:  AP European Historyeirinikouzoukas

Flashcards about Renaissance1 incorrect cards (0) correct cards (0) remaining cards (43) Question click to flip Peter Doolittle: How your "working memory" makes sense of the world Close Help with subtitles Desktop / laptop users: please make sure you have the most updated versions of your browser and Flash player, and that Flash is enabled when you visit TED.com. The Black Death (Bubonic Plague) - Middle Ages for Kids! During the Hundred Years' War, a lot of people in Europe were very poor and hungry because the soldiers fighting the war had wrecked their farms. Then people began to catch a terrible sickness that was spreading along Mongol trade routes from China through Central Asia to Europe beginning in 1328 AD. This sickness was the bubonic plague.

How the Black Death Changed the World Each Monday, this column turns a page in history to explore the discoveries, events and people that continue to affect the history being made today. Seven thousand people died per day in Cairo. Three-quarters of Florence's residents were buried in makeshift graves in just one macabre year. AP European History Quizzes Advanced Placement European History The Renaissance The Renaissance - Multiple Choice More Multiple Choice on the Renaissance Even More Multiple Choice on the Renaissance Flashcards on Early Modern Europe First Test For College Hopefuls? Decoding Financial Aid Letters Colleges send each prospective student a letter detailing a financial aid award package — but many families say the letters are difficult to understand. iStockphoto hide caption itoggle caption iStockphoto

The Plague! Have you ever heard the nursery rhyme called ring around the rosie? "Ring around the Rosie. Pocket full of poesy. Consequences of the Black Death Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411) The consequences of the Black Death included a series of religious, social and economic upheavals, which had profound effects on the course of European history. The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking in Europe between 1347 and 1350 with 30–60 percent of Europe's population killed.[1] It reduced world population from an estimated 450 million to between 350 and 375 million in the 14th century. It took 150 and in some areas more than 250 years for Europe's population to recover. Death toll[edit] Figures for the death toll vary widely by area and from source to source as new research and discoveries come to light.

Making the History of 1989 The Fall of Communism in Eastern Europe IntroductoryEssay Sets the scene for the events of 1989 and explains their significance in world history. PrimarySources Over 300 primary sources, including government documents, images, videos, and artifacts with introductory notes. Depression What Is Depression? Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness. Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment.

Black Death — History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts Today, scientists understand that the Black Death, now known as the plague, is spread by a bacillus called Yersina pestis. (The French biologist Alexandre Yersin discovered this germ at the end of the 19th century.) They know that the bacillus travels from person to person pneumonically, or through the air, as well as through the bite of infected fleas and rats. Both of these pests could be found almost everywhere in medieval Europe, but they were particularly at home aboard ships of all kinds–which is how the deadly plague made its way through one European port city after another. Not long after it struck Messina, the Black Death spread to the port of Marseilles in France and the port of Tunis in North Africa. Then it reached Rome and Florence, two cities at the center of an elaborate web of trade routes.

Effects of the Black Death" The Black Death reared its head sporadically in Europe over the next few centuries. But by 1352, it had essentially loosened its grip. Europe's population had been hard hit, which had an economic impact. The workforce had been destroyed -- farms were abandoned and buildings crumbled. The price of labor skyrocketed in the face of worker shortage, and the cost of goods rose. The price of food, though, didn't go up, perhaps because the population had declined so much.

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