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Black Death ("Hollaback Girl" by Gwen Stefani)

Black Death ("Hollaback Girl" by Gwen Stefani)
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How the Black Death Changed the World Each Monday, this column turns a page in history to explore the discoveries, events and people that continue to affect the history being made today. Seven thousand people died per day in Cairo. Three-quarters of Florence's residents were buried in makeshift graves in just one macabre year. By the time the tornado-like destruction of the 14th-century bubonic plague finally dissipated, nearly half the people in each of the regions it touched had succumbed to a gruesome, painful death. The Black Death – as it is commonly called – especially ravaged Europe, which was halfway through a century already marked by war, famine and scandal in the church, which had moved its headquarters from Rome to Avignon, France, to escape infighting among the cardinals. In the end, some 75 million people succumbed, it is estimated. Quick killer The disease existed in two varieties, one contracted by insect bite and another airborne. New landscape

Peter Doolittle: How your "working memory" makes sense of the world Close Help with subtitles Desktop / laptop users: please make sure you have the most updated versions of your browser and Flash player, and that Flash is enabled when you visit TED.com. iOS users: to access subtitles, start playing the video, then tap the speech bubble icon that appears in the bottom row of video controls. Android users: although Android devices do not support subtitles, you can download the TED app from the Google Play store.

BBC Two - Nazis: A Warning from History, Helped into Power Teacher Resource-The Black Death HowStuffWorks Videos The Black Death The Depopulation of Europe.flv First Test For College Hopefuls? Decoding Financial Aid Letters Colleges send each prospective student a letter detailing a financial aid award package — but many families say the letters are difficult to understand. iStockphoto hide caption itoggle caption iStockphoto Colleges send each prospective student a letter detailing a financial aid award package — but many families say the letters are difficult to understand. iStockphoto Around the country, millions of parents of prospective college freshmen are puzzling over one big question: How will we pay for college? The first step for many families is reviewing the financial aid award letters they receive from each school. Chris Reeves, a guidance counselor at Beechwood High School in Fort Mitchell, Ky., tells NPR's David Greene that he fields lots of questions from families trying to decipher their award letters. But loans "don't really reduce your costs," explains Mark Kantrowitz, founder of the financial aid website FinAid.org and publisher of Edvisors Network.

Making the History of 1989 The Fall of Communism in Eastern Europe IntroductoryEssay Sets the scene for the events of 1989 and explains their significance in world history. PrimarySources Over 300 primary sources, including government documents, images, videos, and artifacts with introductory notes. ScholarInterviews Four scholars focus on the history & events surrounding 1989 through primary sources. TeachingModules Modules provide historical context, strategies, and resources for teaching the history of 1989 with primary sources. CaseStudies Teaching case studies provide historical context and strategies for teaching the history of 1989 with primary sources. Advanced Search About this Site © 2007–2018 Roy Rosenzweig Center for History & New Media Powered by Omeka

History Channel - The Plague part 14 Depression What Is Depression? Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness. Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. There are several forms of depressive disorders. Major depression,—severe symptoms that interfere with your ability to work, sleep, study, eat, and enjoy life. Persistent depressive disorder—depressed mood that lasts for at least 2 years. Some forms of depression are slightly different, or they may develop under unique circumstances. Bipolar disorder, also called manic-depressive illness, is not as common as major depression or persistent depressive disorder. Causes Most likely, depression is caused by a combination of genetic, biological, environmental, and psychological factors. Depressive illnesses are disorders of the brain. Diagnosis

Annenberg Learner Select a program below, and click on the VoD icon to view it. If you cannot find the resource you are looking for in this list, check our discontinued series list for distributor contact information. Against All Odds: Inside Statistics Shows students the relevance of statistics in real-world settings. Video series for college and high school classrooms and adult learners. Shows students the relevance of statistics in real-world settings. Algebra: In Simplest Terms A step-by-step look at algebra concepts. America's History in the Making Explore American history from the Pre-Columbian era through Reconstruction in this course for middle and high school teachers. American Cinema Over 150 Hollywood insiders document American culture through film. American Passages: A Literary Survey American literary movements and authors in the context of history and culture. The Art of Teaching the Arts: A Workshop for High School Teachers Art of the Western World Art Through Time: A Global View Calculating Change

Consequences of the Black Death Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411) The consequences of the Black Death included a series of religious, social and economic upheavals, which had profound effects on the course of European history. The Black Death was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, peaking in Europe between 1347 and 1350 with 30–60 percent of Europe's population killed.[1] It reduced world population from an estimated 450 million to between 350 and 375 million in the 14th century. It took 150 and in some areas more than 250 years for Europe's population to recover. Death toll[edit] Figures for the death toll vary widely by area and from source to source as new research and discoveries come to light. The trend of recent research is pointing to a figure more like 45% to 50% of the European population dying during a four-year period. Europe[edit] In Italy, Florence's population was reduced from 110,000 or 120,000 inhabitants in 1338 to 50,000 in 1351. Middle east[edit]

Why Chaucer Said 'Ax' Instead Of 'Ask,' And Why Some Still Do : Code Switch Zach Galifianakis makes an Ax joke. YouTube The most common stereotype of black vernacular is the pronunciation of the word "ask" as "ax." "Ax" has gotten a bad rap for years. Pronounce "ask" as "ax," and immediately many will assume that you're poor, black and uneducated. Garrard McClendon, a professor at Chicago State University, is the author of Ax or Ask? "When you're with your little friends, you can speak any way you want to speak, all right? Sketch comedy duo Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele joke that because they're half-white, they're constantly switching back and forth. Talking over each other, they add: "But when a cop comes up to you, you definitely use a lot of 'asks.' "Ask away, officer, ask away!" Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele talk Ax vs. itoggle caption Sonari Glinton/NPR Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele talk Ax vs. Sonari Glinton/NPR "Anything you want to ask me, I'll be happy to answer, officer." Sheidlower says you can trace "ax" back to the eighth century.

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